Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-17-06, 10:18 PM   #1
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Motor or Engine-assisted bikes... Heresy?

Double post removed by Moderators after merging two threads
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-06, 10:28 PM   #2
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Motor or Engine-assisted bikes... Heresy?

What's everyone's opinion on this? Do you consider petroleum-powered or electric powered (which get charged from a wall-outlet that likely draws from a Coal plant) bicycles as viable "car free" alternatives, for use when you need more speed, more torque (for heavier loads), or longer range than you could get without assistance?

For instance, I could easily make my whole commute (60 miles RT) WITHOUT leaving at 5am and getting home at 8pm, with a kit like this:

http://cleverchimp.com/products/stokemonkey/

And to top it off, the increased speed and capacity would make things like fast-food runs, trips to home depot, and scavenging the curbside for things I can use, possible on a bike. Matter of fact, if santa got me that setup for Christmas, I probably wouldn't need my car or the city bus for anything more than long-distance (hundreds of miles per day) trips with the wife.

I know there are dozens, if not 100+ different kits out there for adding electric or gasoline power to a bike. Does this kind of go against the "car free" lifestyle?
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-06, 10:55 PM   #3
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Bikes: several
Posts: 4,269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
They pollute, and they're noisy. I have come across a couple of them being operated illegally on my local MUP on old beater x-mart bikes with virtually no braking ability by riders with the attitude that they have some sort of right of way. If you do get one at least keep it on the road where it belongs.

BTW I have commuted over 60 miles a day, 5 or 6 days a week for many car free years, and I work 12 hour shifts - it's no big deal. If you get one its not because you 'need' one.
__________________
There are 10 types of people in the world - the ones that can count in base 2, the ones that can't count in base 2, and the ones that didn't expect this to be in base 3.
Cyclaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-06, 11:07 PM   #4
cerewa
put our Heads Together
 
cerewa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: southeast pennsylvania
Bikes: a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
Posts: 3,155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
The maker of the cleverchip electric assist (todd, a.k.a. tfahrner on these boards,) is well-respected here. He's been car free for a long time and (i think) is pretty savvy about the political ideals of all sorts of car-free folks.

The amount of fossil fuels used by a 100-pound power-assist bike is a pittance compared to the consumption of a 3000-pound vehicle.

If you're thinking about getting rid of one of your family's cars (I'm not sure how many you have) or just letting your car spend most of its time sitting still I think all of us here would applaud that. If a power assist bike is what makes that feasible, then by all means get one.

Electric assist bikes are not as versatile as we might want them to be, though. I think Todd's kits are more practical than most electric kits for long range and high speed commutes, but i'm not sure whether it's up to the task of a fast 60 mile round trip and you shouldn't expect top speeds much over 25 miles per hour, i think.
cerewa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-06, 11:11 PM   #5
lyeinyoureye
Senior Citizen
 
lyeinyoureye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: no
Bikes: yes
Posts: 1,347
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Totally OT, but that's hellaspensive for what it is. If you have any inclination to DIY, I'd go get a 450W electric scooter motor/controller, a flip flop hub w/ two free wheels of appropriate gearing, however many batts you need, a 40-80w solar panel/charge regulator, an appropriately sized deep cycle LA batt, and NiMH charger. Probably missed something, but that way you can be grid independent in terms of energy, have something that's as useful, and not pay out da butt.
lyeinyoureye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-06, 11:36 PM   #6
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerewa
Electric assist bikes are not as versatile as we might want them to be, though. I think Todd's kits are more practical than most electric kits for long range and high speed commutes, but i'm not sure whether it's up to the task of a fast 60 mile round trip and you shouldn't expect top speeds much over 25 miles per hour, i think.
Well, I'm still fat and out of shape... err... Round is a shape...

I have a family, and being away for 15-17 hours for a 9 hour work day isn't going to fly. My wife respects that I'm utility cycling as much as I can because:

1) I love it
2) I want to get healthier
3) It's saving us money

Spending 6-8 hours on the road a day would be a show stopper. There's a bunch of hills no matter what route I take, and even once I start getting in shape, I doubt I could carry much more than maybe a 10 MPH average for the entire trip. 30 miles each way means 6 hours on the road. Maybe in another 2 years I'll have lungs, heart, and legs of steel and can hammer through it in 3-4 hours.

If Stokemonkey shaves that down to an hour and a half each direction in the short term, it wouldn't really be much slower than taking the bus, once you consider all the streets it hits and stops it makes that are superfluous to my commute. I wasn't expecting much more than the ability to hold a 20 MPH average with assist. I certainly didn't think anything would make my bike capable of keeping up with suburban 45 MPH traffic.

I already own two great compact cars that get good gas mileage, but they're getting more and more jealous these days. For the last 2 months, I've been using them only when something at work requires me to be there outside the bus schedule (once per week). I did all my christmas shopping on my bike and I always use it for trips to the grocery store.

I just keep thinking, I could avoid the hassle and expense of the bus, then I wouldn't need to rely on its schedule. I wouldn't need the car. I could save $650+ per year in bus fare, and tell my consulting company to cancel my $50/mo parking space at work... And voila. It wouldn't take long to get a good return.

Anyhow, sounds like a mixed bag of opinions so far. I kind of expected some hostility.

For what it's worth, the electric ones aren't THAT noisy and most of the pollution is from the electricity generated to charge it. I rarely use the local MUP as it is. I certainly wouldn't be operating under power where it's not legal. Likely, I would use a lighter and more practical bike for recreational use on a trail anyways, and I always keep my brakes in top shape.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 05:11 AM   #7
The Human Car
-=Barry=-
 
The Human Car's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Baltimore, MD +/- ~100 miles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,077
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think they can help wean society off its over dependence on cars.
__________________
Cycling Advocate
http://BaltimoreSpokes.org
. . . o
. . /L
=()>()
The Human Car is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 10:16 AM   #8
jakub.ner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: London, Ontario
Bikes: 2 Xootr Swifts, Dahon Curve, Oxford Winter Beater.
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've considered these before so that I could get to work and not be too sweaty. I've since discounted these for me, personally. It wasn't versatile enough to haul up the stairs when the elevator was out of service. It also wouldn't cut it in winter. It would add to the complexity of my bicycle and this was one of my main reasons for ditching the Nissan. Finally there is the noise, poor efficiency, and environmental damage.

Having said that this was my choice. I've overcome my reason to get the motor by dressing more appropriatelly .

I think a pollution free, quiet, electric assist is the way to go. Even if it is pollution free locally. Hey, I'd love for all the cars to be electric so that I don't have to breathe in the crap when I'm cycling. A boon would be if they could build the coal powered station by a volcanoe, we wouldn't notice the pollution .
jakub.ner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 12:57 PM   #9
Roody
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Bikes:
Posts: 23,578
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
I have no philosophical argument against it, although i don't foresee getting one.

Any way you can test drive it for an entire commute before purchasing?
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 01:15 PM   #10
wahoonc
Senior Member
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
Posts: 16,687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I vote for the electric over the gas, but that is personal preference. I have owned many small two stroke engines over the years (still have a couple ) and they can be very temperamental. Plus in both cases (electric and gas) if the unit goes down for whatever reason you are going to have one heavy sucker to pedal the rest of the way home Any chance on moving closer to work or telecommuting?

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 01:33 PM   #11
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No telecommuting, and I'm a contracted employee anyways (basically, a temp-to-hire). I would like a job closer to home, but there's a good chance I'll be here for a while, and might even get on full time. I wouldn't want to live any closer to downtown KC than I already do.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 03:13 PM   #12
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Bikes: several
Posts: 4,269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
Well, I'm still fat and out of shape... err... Round is a shape...
Yup, round is a shape, and thats the shape you'll stay in with motorised transport.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
There's a bunch of hills no matter what route I take, and even once I start getting in shape, I doubt I could carry much more than maybe a 10 MPH average for the entire trip.
What do you base that on? you have no idea at the moment as you haven't even tried.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
Maybe in another 2 years I'll have lungs, heart, and legs of steel and can hammer through it in 3-4 hours.
And how are you going to get that heart & lung capacity, and legs of steel?...oh yeah, that's right, with motorised transport.

If you're looking for a cheaper transport option that's fine, nothing wrong with that. But if you're not willing to overcome a few hurdles then don't kid yourself, you'll still be overweight and unhealthy, and you'll still be using motorised transport 2 years from now. I've dropped over 70 pounds over the last 3 years and plan on dropping another 20 over the next 2 years. The only reason I dropped the weight is that I bit the bullet and did what had to be done starting with 7 hours a day on the bike. I won't lie to you, in the first year i was in a world of pain. Now I cruise through a hilly 30 mile commute at over 18mph average, and can top 20mph average if I'm in a hurry - not too bad for a 40 year old. i do that 5 days a week, rain hail or shine, day or night, and if I can do it with zero athletic talent then anyone can, its just a question of commitment.
__________________
There are 10 types of people in the world - the ones that can count in base 2, the ones that can't count in base 2, and the ones that didn't expect this to be in base 3.
Cyclaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 08:01 PM   #13
Platy
Dare to be weird!
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Austin TX
Bikes: Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
Posts: 1,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ax0n, the choice is yours to make. Motors for convenience, muscles for vitality.
Platy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 08:18 PM   #14
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclaholic
If you're looking for a cheaper transport option that's fine, nothing wrong with that. But if you're not willing to overcome a few hurdles then don't kid yourself, you'll still be overweight and unhealthy, and you'll still be using motorised transport 2 years from now. I've dropped over 70 pounds over the last 3 years and plan on dropping another 20 over the next 2 years. The only reason I dropped the weight is that I bit the bullet and did what had to be done starting with 7 hours a day on the bike. I won't lie to you, in the first year i was in a world of pain. Now I cruise through a hilly 30 mile commute at over 18mph average, and can top 20mph average if I'm in a hurry - not too bad for a 40 year old. i do that 5 days a week, rain hail or shine, day or night, and if I can do it with zero athletic talent then anyone can, its just a question of commitment.
I don't *HAVE* 35 hours per week to spend on a bike on top of the 45 hours a week I spend at work. It's not about commitment to my health. It's about having a family. I don't plan on letting a freaking motor tote me along at 20 MPH day in and day out while I put my feet on the handlebars, eat a whole box of twinkies, and catch up on the WSJ on my way to work. Sure, if I ride the 60 miles per day for a year, my heart will get stronger, my lungs will get better, my weight will melt away, my legs will tone up, and my times will get better. I still don't see 60 miles round trip taking a reasonable amount of time.

As of current, I'm riding a pitiful 10-15 miles per day 4-5 days per week after modifying my bi-modal commute route. I'm still losing weight, and I was losing weight riding 6-10 miles per day 2-3 days a week when I started doing this 10 weeks ago. I seriously doubt that I'd start packing on the pounds if I upped my ride to 60 miles with assistance.

But hey, it's your perogative, I suppose. After I map out a few more routes to get to work, and once the sun decides to stay out a little longer, I'll go ahead and give it a shot just to say that I can and I did.

I'm not on that much of a leash, but I don't see how anyone here can think that spending 70% of your life away from home just to get to work and back is a good thing.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 08:46 PM   #15
pmseattle
Senior Member
 
pmseattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's absurd to think that you have to spend seven hours a day on a bicycle to be healthy. The 10-15 miles a day 4-5 days a week you mentioned should work fine for just about anybody. Besides the electric assist bike, there are other alternatives to explore: you could try riding the full trip on your regular bike once or twice a week, or if your bus has bike racks you could rid part way on the bus and bike the rest of the way, or you could drive part way and bike the rest.
pmseattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 10:09 PM   #16
Platy
Dare to be weird!
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Austin TX
Bikes: Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
Posts: 1,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, my opinion is that carfree living in a car dependent world is a Version 0.9 kind of experimental lifestyle. The bugs haven't been worked out yet.

Ax0n, I looked at your blog to get some deeper insight into your original question. The opinion I can offer is that you are experiencing the difficulty of finding a transportation mode that's anywhere near to being a direct functional substitute for a personal motor vehicle.

When I became carfree a few years ago I thought I'd just replace my car travel with walking, public transit, and eventually cycling. I racked up lots of miles that way with blisters on my feet, saddle sores, and spending hours a day on buses.

It slowly dawned on me that successful carfree living for me depends a lot on making new life choices to reduce the amount of transportation required to live the way I want. Those choices can be as simple as deciding to shop at the local grocery store instead of a better one that's further away. Or they can be as complicated as changing jobs or moving to a different neighborhood.

I think most people here are very fortunate that they can make many such life choices as they see fit. This is not the case for people especially in the less developed countries who are more economically challenged. I also think that in the future Americans are likely to be more constrained in their transportation choices. But for now, the energy party's not over yet. Make your transportation choices to suit yourself in light of your own experiences. We can discuss them and of course we will have differing opinions, but for now they are your choices and you have the liberty to make them as you see fit.
Platy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 10:21 PM   #17
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, right now the bus is the missing link. It's a crutch, really. It's slow, but it's faster than riding the whole trip would be (at least, in my current state of bodily disarray). I hit the bus via bike as often as I possibly can, which is always at least four if not five work days per week. I went 2 weeks without driving my car a while ago. Even in snow that buried the front hub of my bike.

Resilience isn't a problem. I could do 30 miles, twice a day. That's not a problem either (but it would be a slow and painful trip).

I guess I should have gone with my instincts, but this question has been pestering me for a while. "what would the car-free people think..."

I knew the answer all along. Everyone here is from a different walk of life, so there will be as many different answers as there are people replying.

Personally, I'm doing it because it's fun and good for me. That's it. And when it stops being fun, half my passion will be gone. 60 miles a day wouldn't be fun right now. So maybe I'll just build up to it, even if it takes 5 years.

And edit:

You're only half-right about me looking for something to replace a motor vehicle. Quite the contrary, I love my cars. I love wrenching on them, I love driving very, very fast, I like autocrossing and technical courses that require one to show a measure of restraint and control. I like getting oil on my arms and face and in my hair. I like the scream of 16,000 tiny explosions per minute, neck-snapping accelleration, and all that stuff. I wouldn't trade it for the world.

But despite my cars being in top shape and one of them getting 42 MPG without any hybrid trickery, it's not nearly as relaxing, reliable, efficient, or fun as a bike when it comes to getting from point a to point B. The only thing a car does better is cover long distances faster, and quite frankly, the trade-off isn't worth it most of the time.

I'm looking to have a bike as a daily driver for everything mundane and close, and have the car for only recreational purposes and long trips. Now you know why I was so vague. Flame away.

Last edited by ax0n; 12-18-06 at 10:28 PM.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 10:39 PM   #18
Platy
Dare to be weird!
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Austin TX
Bikes: Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
Posts: 1,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
On the average I cycle about 7 miles a day with occasional hills in the 5% range. Sometimes I will ride up to 25 miles or so without any extra effort or aftereffects. I'm 54 and weigh 260 pounds, which is 40 less than my all time high, but weight loss from cycling has not been my goal since experience indicates that it all eventually returns with 5% interest. This is the background.

In two years my average cruising speed has improved from around 8 to about 10.5 mph. More important, there are a couple of 9-10% grade hills I now climb without stopping where when I started I needed to pause twice to catch my breath.

This isn't a result that would impress anyone in the athletic subforums, but I think it might indicate the minimum you could expect just by cycling moderately and persistently for a couple of years.
Platy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-06, 11:44 PM   #19
Cyclaholic
CRIKEY!!!!!!!
 
Cyclaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Bikes: several
Posts: 4,269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
I don't *HAVE* 35 hours per week to spend on a bike on top of the 45 hours a week I spend at work. It's not about commitment to my health. It's about having a family. I don't plan on letting a freaking motor tote me along at 20 MPH day in and day out while I put my feet on the handlebars, eat a whole box of twinkies, and catch up on the WSJ on my way to work. Sure, if I ride the 60 miles per day for a year, my heart will get stronger, my lungs will get better, my weight will melt away, my legs will tone up, and my times will get better. I still don't see 60 miles round trip taking a reasonable amount of time.

As of current, I'm riding a pitiful 10-15 miles per day 4-5 days per week after modifying my bi-modal commute route. I'm still losing weight, and I was losing weight riding 6-10 miles per day 2-3 days a week when I started doing this 10 weeks ago. I seriously doubt that I'd start packing on the pounds if I upped my ride to 60 miles with assistance.

But hey, it's your perogative, I suppose. After I map out a few more routes to get to work, and once the sun decides to stay out a little longer, I'll go ahead and give it a shot just to say that I can and I did.

I'm not on that much of a leash, but I don't see how anyone here can think that spending 70% of your life away from home just to get to work and back is a good thing.
We have the exact same ammount of time - 24 hours each day, it's just a matter of how we choose to use them.

Look, I'm not apologising for some harsh sounding advice only because I do practice exactly what I preach (I have 3 young children also) and I know it works. It's great that you are doing the ammount of riding that you do, and combined with healthy eating habits you'll get fitter, healthier, and faster on the bike, so keep it up.

When you feel ready I would encourage you to at least try your entire commute just once, maybe on a Friday so you have the weekend to recover. It will be a challenge, and completing it will give you a great psychological boost. In the mean time look at multimode transpost as others have suggested, you have some good options to choose from.

Whatever you decide, I really do wish all the best for you, you're out there thinking outside the metal box and that's fantastic. I hope it works out, and you know we'll always be right here with words of encouragement any time its needed.

...I do however stand by my initial answer to your initial question - I hate those bike motor contraptions
__________________
There are 10 types of people in the world - the ones that can count in base 2, the ones that can't count in base 2, and the ones that didn't expect this to be in base 3.
Cyclaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 12:38 AM   #20
cerewa
put our Heads Together
 
cerewa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: southeast pennsylvania
Bikes: a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
Posts: 3,155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
I like getting oil on my arms and face and in my hair.
Eww, I'm glad I don't have to like getting oil on me to ride an oil-lubricated bicycle. My allergies act up when I spend too much time around bike lubricants.

Quote:
They pollute, and they're noisy.
I'm not sure about the cleverchimp thing, but many electric assists for bikes are basically inaudible. And yes, electric assist bikes pollute, but I'd say the per-person pollution isn't that much worse than your average diesel bus.

P.S., I have never actually tried todd's electric assist, I just think that the idea behind it (i.e. multi-speed chain-drive electric assist) is a good one.
cerewa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 09:23 AM   #21
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerewa
Eww, I'm glad I don't have to like getting oil on me to ride an oil-lubricated bicycle. My allergies act up when I spend too much time around bike lubricants.
It's probably just the kid in me that likes getting dirty. Except now it's my wife chewing me out, not my mom. But Laundry is one of my many chores, so she can't complain about having to clean my grimy clothes.

I'll give the 60 mile round trip a shot once the weather is nicer. Like I said, I already go bi-modal with the bus, and rarely touch my car. If I'm too tuckered out to get home after the 30-mile ride to work, I'll just take the bus home and ride the 3 miles home from the bus stop. It'd be a start, at least. Plus, I'd still get HOME at a decent time. I value my evening time with the wife more than the morning time anyways.

Looks like I'll just stick it out and work on my endurance.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 10:58 AM   #22
jakub.ner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: London, Ontario
Bikes: 2 Xootr Swifts, Dahon Curve, Oxford Winter Beater.
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
... As of current, I'm riding a pitiful 10-15 miles per day 4-5 days per week after modifying my bi-modal commute route ...
Heh, that's great! Nothing pitiful about that.

Went portaging with a friend he stated that when we go into the woods, he doesn't want to make it an "enduro" event. He wants to enjoy it so that he will come back later. I love that philosophy because I often have to force myself to do "cool" things, probably because I do make them "enduro" events .
jakub.ner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 01:21 PM   #23
ax0n
Trans-Urban Velocommando
Thread Starter
 
ax0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Bikes: 06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I should have put "pitiful" in "quotes" - partially because it's only 1/4 of the total distance I'd need to ride every day if I went bike only, and partially because some people think it's a subpar effort, and I'm destined to remain a clyde for the rest of my life until I become a man and can ride 300+ miles every week for several years in a row...

I realize that 15 miles a day isn't that shabby. A lot of people I work with couldn't ride 10 in a single sitting.
ax0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 01:39 PM   #24
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Bikes:
Posts: 12,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ax0n
Does this kind of go against the "car free" lifestyle?
My take on them is that they tend to be toys. Even if well built, they are marketed at people who would rather be driving. So they tend to be used a few times and abandoned.

I think if you are serious about motorized wheels, you will upgrade yourself to a full-sized motorcycle just for the fun, added acceleration and carrying capacity. Otherwise, a bicycle will do fine.
Artkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-06, 01:48 PM   #25
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Bikes:
Posts: 12,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclaholic
I've dropped over 70 pounds over the last 3 years and plan on dropping another 20 over the next 2 years. The only reason I dropped the weight is that I bit the bullet and did what had to be done starting with 7 hours a day on the bike. I won't lie to you, in the first year i was in a world of pain. Now I cruise through a hilly 30 mile commute at over 18mph average, and can top 20mph average if I'm in a hurry - not too bad for a 40 year old. i do that 5 days a week, rain hail or shine, day or night, and if I can do it with zero athletic talent then anyone can, its just a question of commitment.
My hat's off to you. I think you win the long commute contest.

My longest commute was 17 miles each way. I got in better shape, but I also got exceedingly bored and found that that much cycling interfered with what I hoped to accomplish in life. When I moved to Arkansas, a short commute was one of my highest priorities in finding an apartment.
Artkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:23 PM.