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Old 12-27-06, 09:34 AM   #1
chromabrio
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State wants to make roads more friendly for cyclists

(from boston.com)
December 27, 2006

MONTPELIER, Vt. --Move over, Vermont drivers. The state wants to make the state's highways more friendly for bicyclists and pedestrians.

The Vermont Agency of Transportation wants to incorporate bicycle and pedestrian access into projects and will encourage local governments and regional planners to do the same.
The improvements range from making sure new crosswalks comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act to routinely making bike paths a part of road improvements, said Scott Bascom, a planning coordinator for the agency.
"When we do paving jobs, sometimes they'll try to make the shoulder as wide as possible, maybe take the edge line and bring it in a foot so it's an 11-foot traveled lane instead of 12 feet, and there's more of a shoulder for cyclists," Bascom said.
Another change would encourage the installation of more bicycle racks in downtown areas around the state.
"I think it's a step in the right direction," said Jim Tasse, executive director of the Rutland Area Physical Activity Coalition.
Tasse said one of the largest barriers to increased bicycle and pedestrian activity is lack of infrastructure.
"What I hear again and again is it's scary to ride a bike in Rutland," Tasse said. "It's scary to be a pedestrian, too. A lot of the sidewalks are in disrepair. I think if you build it, they will come, and study after study proves it."
Tasse said the improvements to Shelburne Road in South Burlington showed how practical bicycle-friendly changes can be.
"Even in an area that was very built up, they were successful in accommodating bicycles," he said. "The ideal situation is the notion of routine accommodation built into planning."
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Old 12-27-06, 12:28 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Bascom, a planning coordinator for the agency
"When we do paving jobs, sometimes they'll try to make the shoulder as wide as possible, maybe take the edge line and bring it in a foot so it's an 11-foot traveled lane instead of 12 feet, and there's more of a shoulder for cyclists," Bascom said
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I'd rather have the wider lane than a wider shoulder. Shoulders are trashy places and drivers don't always look for traffic to be in them. If Scott Bascom isn't a cyclist (and I bet he isn't), he should consult with cyclists and find out what would really be useful for us.
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Old 12-27-06, 01:24 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Roody
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I'd rather have the wider lane than a wider shoulder.
I would too on a city street. On a highway, I think I might prefer the shoulder. He's saying highway, but who knows what he really means.
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Old 01-01-07, 01:29 AM   #4
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i bet he really does mean highways...it's Vermont, there are not that many highway miles in that state...i could not imagine how they would ever be able to make the normal roads suitable for bikes with large shoulders...all the roads in that state are the most windyest, non-straight, curvy, twisty roads maybe in the country...fixing the highways up a bit would be cheap and a lot easier...they have to work on those highways alot becasue of the extremem weather and scraping and pounding by snow removal equipement
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