Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What kind of bike to get?

    Well, i'd like to go carfree (which is easy, since i've never owned a car myself), and i'm wondering on what sort of bike to get. On one hand, I need a bike that can easily go up and down hills, but on the other, hardly anywhere around here has bike racks, so i'd like something I can easily carry on me, or take inside a store. I've thought about a folder, but i'm not sure how good they'd be for going up and down hills. Cargo isn't too big a deal, as I would have hardly any use of carrying anything that wouldn't fit in a backpack. On the same note, as far as backpacks go, is it better to get one with one large compartment, or a lot of smaller ones, and are there any specific brands you'd reccomend?

    Basically, is it better to get a small bike that might be harder to use, a big bike I have to leave at risk for theft and have a hard time parking?

  2. #2
    est'd 1966 tfahrner's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    portland, oregon
    Posts
    273
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    there's nothing about foldability per se that makes for bad climbing and descending ability. folders with small wheels are at a disadvantage to big-wheel bikes offroad and on similarly rough surfaces, though. i couldn't be happier with my brompton folder. i don't carry a lock with it: it comes inside: http://todd.cleverchimp.com/blog/?p=100

  3. #3
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,277
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Folder (I like Bromptons and Dahons) or a used MTB with fenders and racks and a decent lock. I used to use a Giant Iguana rigid with slicks as my commuter/grocery getter. I never had it stolen from where it was locked up, but it did get stolen out of my house while I was on vacation...go figure. If you get an older one and make it look crappy and keep it locked with a cable and decent U-lock anywhere short of NYC or any other high theft area you should be fine. As a general rule I don't like things on my back.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  4. #4
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX 77095
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Schwinn Frontier FS MTB, Centurion LeMans (1986)
    Posts
    1,470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We don't have many bike racks here, either. You use a long cable and padlock to lock up with. It's fine for just running into a store.

    I would advise against compromising the rideability and utility of your primary transportation vehicle just so you can avoid locking it.

    When you carry a wet, dripping, muddy folding bike into a nice store, you're going to get some resentment from the management, and rightly so. When the greasy chain of your folding bike rubs up aginst your trouser leg as you carry, you won't like that either.

  5. #5
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    southeast pennsylvania
    My Bikes
    a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
    Posts
    3,149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do you mind telling us where you live (whether you live in NY City)? If I lived there I probably wouldn't leave a bike locked outside, but I live in Philadelphia and I do leave my bike locked outside at locations all over the city. I have a sturdy lock and an ugly but durable bike, which is a combination I would highly recommend for this and many other cities.

    hardly anywhere around here has bike racks,
    I have never, ever had a real problem finding things to lock up to and I don't use bike racks very often. I use parking meters, street signs, stop signs, and sometimes trees.

    There's nothing wrong with a good folding bike though. The one I have is far less stiff than my non-folding bike and i'm leery about its ability to survive stand-up riding on a regular basis, but the same might not be true of recent-model folding bikes.
    Some awesome folks who are working to give Haitians the ability to manage their safety and their lives:
    Haiti Partners

  6. #6
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I live near KC. I think i'll get a regular bike then, should be easy to find a good used one cheap. What would you reccomend as far as carrying, a backpack, those bags that attach to the bike (forgot what they're called); or something else? Hm...are there any makers of locking cases for bikes, like there are for motorcycles?

  7. #7
    Dare to be weird!
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin TX
    My Bikes
    Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by feba
    What would you reccomend as far as carrying, a backpack, those bags that attach to the bike (forgot what they're called); or something else?
    I use a backpack. Some people like them and other people don't. It could be that backpacks are less annoying for people who use an upright riding position.

  8. #8
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,277
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Platy
    I use a backpack. Some people like them and other people don't. It could be that backpacks are less annoying for people who use an upright riding position.
    I don't like backpacks. I have a couple of different bags I use depending on the trip involved. I have a nice Cardice saddle bag for my Superbe, I have an old Cannodale commuter pannier that has been rebuilt about 4 times it is really handy in that it drops over the rack and clips on each side, thing old fashioned saddle bags. I also have a set of the grocery bag panniers, the open top basket ones that fold up when you aren't using them.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized S-Works Tricross
    Posts
    462
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hey feba - mind if I ask you some questions so that we can drive you understanding of car-free in a more systematic manner?

    Your first question on what kind of bike to get really depends a lot on how you are going to use it. While nearly any bike you choose would probably be just fine there are some subtle differences you may want to take into consideration.

    Before we can get too deep into that I think we need to know a little bit more about you. Since the primary use of a bike in being car-free is going to/from work (assuming you are not retired) can you tell us:
    1) How far is it to work?
    2) Is this a route you would confidently ride on a bike or would you need to find an alternative (and possibly longer) route?
    3) Is it good pavement, bad pavement, or no pavement?
    4) Are you going to need to shower/change upon arriving at work?
    5) Where would your bike be kept while at work? Is this a safe location?

  10. #10
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1) I don't have a job, so this isn't a concern for me at all. Places i've considered go from about half a mile to a couple miles away; with the exception of a friend's store which is 6-9 miles away (depending on route, if I decided to take a calmer route it's about 8+, could probably cut that down some if I took a busier and more hilly route), but there's hills and such in the way, so it would be longer

    2) It would take some getting used to (I haven't ridden a bike in years), but I would have no problems riding on the calmer route.

    3) Good pavement

    4) Most likely not

    5) No idea. if at a friends shop, probably in the back, so fairly yes. If one of the other places, possibly outside, however if I go with the closest location, I could easily walk (about 15-25 minute walk depending on mood and music, could stay off major roads the entire way easily if I cut through a schoolyard, or walk around it and still stay on a sidewalk most of the way.)

    My main use for a bike would be errand running, groceries, shopping, and just getting out. In which case, my answers would be something like:

    1) Again, about .5 to 10 miles, again though, on hills
    2) Mostly, yes. I probably wouldn't be comfortable going to the farther mall, but I don't go there much anyway
    3) again, yes
    4) again, no
    5) this is my main concern, as again, i'd probably be forced to either take it with me, or lock it up outside somehow. I've seen some bike suitcases or slings, however these DEMAND a folding bike for obvious reasons, and i'm unsure if their performance and load carrying ability would be enough for me. I need to lose weight before I get a bike in any case, as i'm above the weight guidelines on most folding bikes i've seen, and I would feel uncomfortable riding a bike anyway.

  11. #11
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX 77095
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Schwinn Frontier FS MTB, Centurion LeMans (1986)
    Posts
    1,470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "I need to lose weight before I get a bike in any case, as i'm above the weight guidelines on most folding bikes i've seen, and I would feel uncomfortable riding a bike anyway."

    How much do you weigh? If you're a Clydesdale rider, and you want to carry a load, I would really shy away from a folding bike. SAFETY most important.

  12. #12
    Senior Member swwhite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis MN USA
    My Bikes
    Trek 4300
    Posts
    840
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are going to avoid spending thousands (or sometimes tens of thousands) of dollars on a car, plus insurance, plus gasoline, and use a bicycle as your main means of transportation, it might not be inappropriate to have several. You could ride a folder to work so you could bring it inside, use something cheap with low theft-appeal and good U-lock for errands (like a used women's three-speed, something your average teenage thief would turn up his nose at), keep a beater with permanently-mounted studded tires ready for bad weather, have a dedicated cargo bike with an Xtracycle.

    For carrying stuff on the body, some people like the messenger bags because it is supposedly easy to get in and out of them without taking them off, as one would do with a backpack. I personally have no experience with them.
    Riding in search of the simple life.

  13. #13
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,488
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cerewa
    I have never, ever had a real problem finding things to lock up to and I don't use bike racks very often. I use parking meters, street signs, stop signs, and sometimes trees.
    Agreed. The only place for miles around that has a bike rack (other than elementary schools and the LBS) is the public library. I don't use it there because as staff, I park my bike in a workroom in the back.

    Everyplace else, I lock to whatever is available. The cart return corral at the grocery store, railings at another grocery store and the post office, no parking sign at the diner. I have to get creative at the hardware store, where I lock to their display of wheelbarrows. Not as secure as I'd like, but it would make a heluva racket if someone tried to take my bike. And they'd have to drag a wheelbarrow along with it.

    In short, in a year of exclusively cycling for transport, with a good U-lock and a cable for it, I've never found a place I couldn't conveniently lock.

    I have nothing against folders, in fact, I'd like one for travel, and I'm also looking at a folding mountain bike, thinking it would be easier to store in my apartment. But I can't see dragging one in and out of every place I stop.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized S-Works Tricross
    Posts
    462
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    100% Agree with previous posters. I don't think feba's first choice should be a folder.

    Folding bikes are really a niche product that come into their own when some segment of your journey is by another conveyance (e.g., rail car, bus, airplane) and its not possible or convenient for you to break down a regular bike.

    Hi-theft area: OK - this might lead one to choose a folder in order to keep the bike off the street. Another strategy, and one I'm going to recommend to feba, is simply to purchase cheap 2nd hand bikes and secure them with expensive u-locks.

    If you lose a bike or 2 a year - is just the cost of being car-free. And I think a cheap bike properly locked (with U-locks) is going to be passed over time and time again by thiefs who will go after the more expensive ones secured only by a cheap cable lock.

    Locking bike up - Again 100% agree. Once you know what to look for you should easily see many secure places.

  15. #15
    Dare to be weird!
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin TX
    My Bikes
    Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by feba
    I need to lose weight before I get a bike in any case, as i'm above the weight guidelines on most folding bikes i've seen, and I would feel uncomfortable riding a bike anyway.
    Get any old bike, hop on it and start riding. Your preferences and requirements will quickly become obvious. I'd bet the bike you start with is not the one you will eventually want, so keep that in mind.

    I'm 265 pounds. I started out with a big honkin' Electra Townie because it seemed comfortable and can carry a lot of weight. I soon realized that my concern for the bike's sturdiness was vastly overblown, the Townie for all its other virtues was way heavy, unwieldy and inefficient.

    Then I got a zippy little KHS folder. It was much easier to ride especially up hills, but I after a year I did pop a spoke. The main problem with the folder for general riding is that the 18 inch wheels are more subject to road hazards and tiny little potholes got me twice.

    Right now I'm riding on a 70s era steel racing frame built up with albatross type handlebars (like the old English racers), 32-spoke hand built 700c wheels with 28 mm wide tires, Tektro long reach brakes, and 9-speed Shimano 105 & Deore mixed drive components.

    The point is, you'll probably change your mind about things as you go along. Try out as many bikes as you can before you make a big investment.

    There are lots of clydes out there. Don't let that stop you. I've been to most of the local bike shops around here. The bike shop that was most helpful with the clyde issues was unexpectedly the one that deals with the highest end road bikes and caters to the elite athletic set. (One of the owners of that shop is a clyde!)

  16. #16
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well, i'm abotu 230lbs, losing a pound or two a week though, which will be more since I dropped drinking anything but water from my diet last week.

    Well I think i'm decided on just getting an old bike, but does anyone have suggestions for what to get? I don't really have money to throw around, i'll probably only be getting one, to start with at least. I wasn't really expecting much in a car, either (but you'd be suprised what people willl ebay for 400$). What should I look for to get a bike that's good for carrying things (although I don't expect very large loads), while still easy to use?

    Oh, and again, does anyone know a company that makes locking bike bags? I wouldn't feel comfortable locking up the bike and not the stuff on it.

  17. #17
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,601
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK, you've decided to get a used bike, which I think is a good plan in your circumstances. My first bike, which I got when I was about your weight, was a used Walmart-type mountain bike that I paid $30 for. It worked great for a couple months. I then bought a used brand-named mountain bike for $125--an older model with steel frame and no suspension (called a hardtail MTB--in my case the brand was a Specialized Hardrock).

    I think this would be a good choice for you, feba. MTBs (mountain bikes) are good for a first bike because they're stable and easy to ride. They have strong frames and wheels and they can take a lot of abuse. You ride a little more upright than on a road bike, which you might find to be more comfortable until you lose 30 pounds or so.

    I would suggest looking for major name brands, since you don't know a lot about bikes. Any MTBs made by Specialized, Trek or Giant are decent bikes. A bike that's 5 to 15 years old, and hasn't been ridden much, is what you should be looking for. Look in pawn shops, bike shops and online. (You're unlikely to find a decent bike in a resale shop, but these are great places to find really messed up beaters.) Expect to pay between $125 and $175.

    Good luck--I think you're gonna love this!

    Oh--welcome to the forum. I hope we can help you get started.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Davis, CA
    My Bikes
    several custom 3 speed internal hub raod bikes, a fixie in progress, and a touring road bike.
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Check Craigslist. Any giant or trek mountain bike under $100 is going to be fine and resellable. (make sure it's tuned). The giant Sedona comfort hybrid is especially good if you find one cheap.

    A decent LBS might have some used/sale or whatnots around.

    Don't bother with locking bike bags. just get a basket pannier (the folding grocery bag types) and a shoulderbag that fits in it.... or get one of the pannier bags that comes with a shoulder strap and take it with you....
    looking for the one true bike.

  19. #19
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,601
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Christof H
    Check Craigslist. Any giant or trek mountain bike under $100 is going to be fine and resellable. (make sure it's tuned). The giant Sedona comfort hybrid is especially good if you find one cheap.

    A decent LBS might have some used/sale or whatnots around.

    Don't bother with locking bike bags. just get a basket pannier (the folding grocery bag types) and a shoulderbag that fits in it.... or get one of the pannier bags that comes with a shoulder strap and take it with you
    ....
    Good suggestions. I think it's a good idea to put off the purchase of accessories until you've been riding a couple months.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  20. #20
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    actually, i've been checking craigslist the past few weeks, what do you think of something like the second bike http://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/275489398.html here? I was planning on just getting what I need (bike, helmet, light, locks) to start out with, and building on that, thanks for backing up that idea.

    I noticed on that bike that is has those upright grip handlebars, personally i've never used these- when I rode bikes as a kid they were always the more normal straight across type (horizontal instead of vertical); I tried those upright ones a few times in bike shops, but I had steering problems. Would it be a good idea to get used to them, or replace them?

    EDIT:Or one of http://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/275484132.html these? Also cheap.
    Last edited by feba; 02-08-07 at 02:52 PM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized S-Works Tricross
    Posts
    462
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    My first bike, which I got when I was about your weight, was a used Walmart-type mountain bike that I paid $30 for. It worked great for a couple months. I then bought a used brand-named mountain bike for $125--an older model with steel frame and no suspension (called a hardtail MTB--in my case the brand was a Specialized Hardrock).

    I think this would be a good choice for you, feba. MTBs (mountain bikes) are good for a first bike because they're stable and easy to ride. They have strong frames and wheels and they can take a lot of abuse. You ride a little more upright than on a road bike, which you might find to be more comfortable until you lose 30 pounds or so.
    Hey feba - listen to Roody here as I know he's been down the route you are taking. He is true utility cyclist! Myself? - I admittedly throw unseemly amounts of money at my bikes. It is a disease

    I would emphasize avoiding the Wally World bikes at all costs. I don't think they are even worth the $30 used. Roody - feba said he might be riding up to 10 miles at a clip. If I were doing that everyday I would be more disposed to seeking out a true hybrid (road bike, slick tires, straight bar) over a MTB. Granted they might be harder to find used and more expensive.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized S-Works Tricross
    Posts
    462
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by feba
    Oh, and again, does anyone know a company that makes locking bike bags? I wouldn't feel comfortable locking up the bike and not the stuff on it.
    I've never seen the hard shell lockable compartments on bikes that you see on motorcycles. Certainly I think one could be attached to a rear rack if that was what you really needed.

    There are 3 basic ways to carry stuff while cycling. An adherents to each method are quite vociferous in why their way is the best!

    1) In a bag on your body.
    2) In a bag attached to a rack on the bike.
    3) In a trailer towed by the bike.

    Since you are just starting out and wanting to keep costs down I recommend you go with method #1 first. Certainly everybody has a book bag from school lying around that can be used.

    There are many bags specifically made for cycling though. These can be backpacks that are somewhat larger than normal and designed to give some airflow over the back. Many commuters favor messenger bags that are only slung over one shoulder. This makes getting into the bag possible without having to take it completely off.

    The advantage of using a bag that's carried on your body is that when you get to your destination there is nothing you have to take off the bike. You carry everything in the bag. Simply lock the bike and step away.

  23. #23
    Micro Gameboyist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually the only book bag I have that would be suitable for wearing while biking is practically a rag- but since I could get a backpack for a couple bucks at a bin sale or pawn shop or something, I don't think it's too big a deal.

    well, I have a messenger bag I might be able to use, but it has a tendancy to either slip, or choke me. Honestly, i'm much more comfortable with a backpack.

    Something i've seen that I like are the bags that attach to the bike while you're riding, and detatch for shopping or whatever, but a backpack would probably be fine for now.

    Slow Train: While I *might* do 10mi every now and then, it wouldn't be very often as the only circumstance i'd do that would be to again go to the mall (nothing I need to get to is farther than a couple miles away, my house is pretty much right in the middle of two shopping plazas), and since the main reason to go there is to see friends, they would most likely be picking me up anyway. Heck, if I were to work for them, they'd probably pick me up and drop me off everyday, or even let me live with them.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized S-Works Tricross
    Posts
    462
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by feba
    well, I have a messenger bag I might be able to use, but it has a tendancy to either slip, or choke me. Honestly, i'm much more comfortable with a backpack.
    Good messenger bags have stabilizer straps that wrap around your waist to keep the load from slipping. There are many cheaper "messenger bags" out there that aren't really designed for cycling. But for now - go with what you've got.

    If you find you're okay with hauling your stuff on your back then check out FixedGearGallery. They have a really nice review of popular bags:

    Fixed Gear Gallery review of bags

  25. #25
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,601
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Train
    Hey feba - listen to Roody here as I know he's been down the route you are taking. He is true utility cyclist! Myself? - I admittedly throw unseemly amounts of money at my bikes. It is a disease

    I would emphasize avoiding the Wally World bikes at all costs. I don't think they are even worth the $30 used. Roody - feba said he might be riding up to 10 miles at a clip. If I were doing that everyday I would be more disposed to seeking out a true hybrid (road bike, slick tires, straight bar) over a MTB. Granted they might be harder to find used and more expensive
    .
    For the novice, I think good advice is K.I.S.S.--keep it simple, stupid. An expensive bike can be intimidating for a newbie and detract from the joys and challenges of learning (or relearning) how to ride.

    I think the walmart bike (used and very cheap) might be a good way to get started from scratch in cycling. It was for me, anyway. For me, riding was a sudden inspiration, and i knew almost nothing about it. I asked my infamous stepson to find me a bike, and he did, for $30. I had no idea if it was a good bike, but it was good enough to get me started. By the time I was ready to trash that bike, I had learned a lot and I was ready to make a wise decision about a replacement. One thing I learned was that I don't mind riding considerably more than 10 miles on a MTB in the city.

    If the OP (feba) ends up riding a lot, he can find much better deals. For example, if a new Walmart "mountain bike" costs $110, you can certainly find a much nicer used mountain bike for the same money. For a bit more he might find a road bike or hybrid that he likes better. And of course he may decide to go with a brand new bike--MTB, road bike, hybrid, whatever--and pay probably $400 to $900 for a new entry level bike.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •