Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Car free mothers of newborn babies? And 100% child care parents.

    How many members discussing the pros and cons of living car free are mothers that had a baby while car free and continue to be car free?

    If you are male, how many are single and providing 100% care of newborns or a child of any age? How old are they?

    How about a new born and a 2 year old?

    Anyone car free with more than two kids and 100% responsible for the kids? How many kids, what age?
    Do your friends and relatives help with cars and transportation?

    If your spouse has a car and you don't drive did you take the newborn infants to the doctors without a car? How about other places? How old was the kid at the time?
    Anything is possible, what did you actually do ?

    Not remotely interested in theory, or if you watched your spouse do it, what did you actually do? Would you do it again?

    When I had a newborn and a 2 year old my wife went to work before I got home from work. I took over from the baby sitter about 5 or 6 pm. Usually a grand parent with a car of course.
    When my girls were 7 an 9 their mother passed away, now they are 22 and 24. All the relatives have and had cars so did I. I also went to work most of the time. I live in the suburbs.

    Guys that were not the primary care giver, and point out what it's like to be car free with a baby, or mutiple kids typically have no clue deep down inside.

    If you really did it, let's hear anything about how you handled it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #2
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,108
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I was quite a bit younger than I am now, when my wife and I had our first child, we didn't have a car for a while. We lived in the country and mostly took buses or bummed rides off other people. I did a lot of walking to the store (about 1 mile away) and we regularly went to the city by bus to do things like visit the doctor. I would confess that we felt it was a pain having to live in the country w/o 4 wheels.

    I will say that I lived in the city without a car and found it much easier than in the country. And I knew several young families who continued without a car over the years.

    However, I would say that it really depends on the city. Los Angeles would not be a great city to try this and when I moved to Des Moines, I was really amazed at how difficult it was to manoeuver without a car. I grew up in a small town in Canada and at that time most young men didn't own cars. I bought my first vehicle when I was 26.

  3. #3
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    southeast pennsylvania
    My Bikes
    a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
    Posts
    3,149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you really did it, let's hear anything about how you handled it.
    Are you interested in hearing about the experience of being a child of two car-free parents?
    Some awesome folks who are working to give Haitians the ability to manage their safety and their lives:
    Haiti Partners

  4. #4
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cerewa
    Are you interested in hearing about the experience of being a child of two car-free parents?

    Great idea, I did not think of that! Let's hear it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  5. #5
    Senior Member clayborne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    95
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yes, this is equally important as hearing from the parents of a no car family.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    965
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes

    Guys that were not the primary care giver, and point out what it's like to be car free with a baby, or mutiple kids typically have no clue deep down inside.

    Let me get this straight. If my wife has a job, a husband, and a child, she is "100 percent responsible" for childcare, and understands fully what childcare is. But if I have a job, a wife, and a child, I have no clue deep down inside what it takes to raise a child?

    I don't know who you are directing your anger at, but your generalizations are as offensive as they are narrow-minded.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Elite
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by same time

    I don't know who you are directing your anger at, but your generalizations are as offensive as they are narrow-minded.
    Agreed. I work and am a father of a 2 year old and a newborn. I get up every night to tend to the baby, I put the kids to bed and get them up in the morning. I make breakfast/lunch/dinner, I take the oldest to and from daycare. I spend all of waking time either working for them or directly taking care of them.

    You're gonna tell me I have "no clue" about childcare because in addition to my responsibilities as a father I also work?

  8. #8
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Burlington Iowa
    My Bikes
    Vaterland and Ragazzi
    Posts
    20,026
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedSnackFoam
    Agreed. I work and am a father of a 2 year old and a newborn. I get up every night to tend to the baby, I put the kids to bed and get them up in the morning. I make breakfast/lunch/dinner, I take the oldest to and from daycare. I spend all of waking time either working for them or directly taking care of them.

    You're gonna tell me I have "no clue" about childcare because in addition to my responsibilities as a father I also work?
    Wow! You are a busy man taking care of your family reponsibilities. I tip my cap to you.

    Are both you and your wife carfree? Your previous posts on BF indicate you drive a vehicle to and from work. Presumably it is available for other uses as required.
    Last edited by I-Like-To-Bike; 02-26-07 at 11:21 AM.

  9. #9
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    southeast pennsylvania
    My Bikes
    a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
    Posts
    3,149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm going to put some links in this that will give you an idea of what some of the things i'm talking about look like.

    I think my parents were car-free until I was 2 years old (which i don't remember at all) and were also car free while i was 4 and 5 years old- about 1986-88. We lived in Aniak, Alaska - a village of 500 where there were only a few automobiles in total. Aniak had (and has) no paved roads and only a few miles of road altogether- I think a long trip within the village was 2 miles and my family could go to the school, the store, and my parents' workplaces without going more than 15 minutes' walk from home. Aniak is on a large river, and our family had a simple boat (open top, no windscreen or anything) with a 25HP motor. My parents also had a bicycle with a two-child trailer and a three-wheeled ATV, which they later replaced with a four-wheeled ATV.

    The town had one store, which sold just about anything a person would want to buy on short notice (food, mostly). If I'm not mistaken, most people (our family included) would take the 40-minute plane ride on a commercial jet to Anchorage for regular grocery trips to Costco. (Costco is a lot like Sam's Club). We'd go once a month or less, I think. So our family's of five's day to day transportation needs were met by a combination of walking, riding the ATV and using bikes. I think four wheeled ATV can sit two adults and three children- two kids can sit above the rear wheels and the seat can (barely) fit everyone else. Most of the time, people went everywhere at speeds under 15 mph, which is more than fast enough for a half-mile trip. Snowmobiles were common. Many people used boats, or snowmobiles to go hunting and to access nearby towns. Any out-of-town goods came in by barge or airplanes. The roads saw a lot of ATV use, and the ATVs were mainly useful only on beaten paths near the village or on the roads.

    I'm pretty sure that all of the small boats, ATVs, and snowmobiles were uninsured and they probably didn't have any state registration or safety inspection. They were cheap to buy, and rarely needed much maintenance. A tank of gas was only a couple of gallons and would last a long time. Gasoline came in by barge and cost very little compared to one's other expenses.

    None of our family's transportation options involved the kids being under a roof and protected by windshields. We did go out while it was snowing or raining, and in weather below -20 F. We had proper clothing for that sort of weather.

    As it turned out, our family's time in Aniak was without any serious medical emergencies. But when I was ten months old and living in an even smaller Alaskan community, I pulled a mug of near-boiling tea down on to myself. The normal thing in that sort of situation happened- people without a lot of medical equipment or expertise did their best while a medical evacuation aircraft was sent. I don't know whether it was a small plane or helicopter. My mother and I went to an Anchorage hospital and spent a few months there.

    Medical emergencies do sometimes happen in really bad weather, but it's really a very small portion of each year that the weather is so bad the med-evac folks can't fly. People don't worry about it much.
    Last edited by cerewa; 02-26-07 at 12:10 PM.
    Some awesome folks who are working to give Haitians the ability to manage their safety and their lives:
    Haiti Partners

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Elite
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
    Wow! You are a busy man taking care of your family reponsibilities. I tip my cap to you.

    Are both you and your wife carfree? Your previous posts on BF indicate you drive a vehicle to and from work. Presumably it is available for other uses as required.
    No, I am currently not car free but the idea has always appealed to me. I chimed in on this thread because I took issue with the implication that only stay at home mothers can truly understand "deep down inside", and all others have no clue. Whatever that's supposed to mean.

    We are planning to move into town in the next year or two so that our commuting is cut down significantly. My wife and I both work on the same block so once she's back to work we will be able to car pool. In all honesty, I don't think I will ever be car free. My ideal situation is to not have a "daily driver" car, and instead use the bike for commuting and primary (solo) transportation. But I do want to own a classic car of some sort as a hobby so that means I won't be car free, but I won't be car dependent! I don't fit the mold of most here in the car free forum since I actually love cars, it's the traffic I hate!

    And I didn't mean to imply that all of the family responsibilities rest on my shoulders, my wife and I share those responsibilities fairly equally. Except for the breastfeeding! Although, she is still on maternity leave with our newest so I guess technically that makes her "primary caregiver", even if I disagree with what that implies. (At least to the OP)

  11. #11
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by same time
    Let me get this straight. If my wife has a job, a husband, and a child, she is "100 percent responsible" for childcare, and understands fully what childcare is. But if I have a job, a wife, and a child, I have no clue deep down inside what it takes to raise a child?

    I don't know who you are directing your anger at, but your generalizations are as offensive as they are narrow-minded.
    Who said "raise a child" ? I said "be car free with a baby or multiple kids".

    Who's angry? That's just a fact of life. "Typical" means there are exceptions.

    I used typical to mean most often, not all the time. If I said "all" that means everyone.

    Now that you mention it.........
    If you did not spend time alone caring for a baby or very young kids without the wife, you don't know how much work it is. That's life. I did not mention many of these guys think they know exactly what it's like too. If you were not alone with the kids for a few days you still can know how to raise a child, just not how much work it is, and how frustrating it can be to do it alone. I didn't know either. Lots of guys admit it.
    And if you were not car free with a baby alone you don't really know what that was like.

    How often did you take care of your kid so your wife could go away for a few days? How long?
    You may have been 100% responsible for a while. That's a big help.

    When you had a baby did your wife go off for the weekend while you car free at the time? Then you were 100% responsible for a while and car free. That counts, not as much as a week or two but it helps. Tell me how you did it? For how long?

    Some things are not what they appear to be just by observing. That's why I want first hand experience not theory.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  12. #12
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedSnackFoam
    Agreed. I work and am a father of a 2 year old and a newborn. I get up every night to tend to the baby, I put the kids to bed and get them up in the morning. I make breakfast/lunch/dinner, I take the oldest to and from daycare. I spend all of waking time either working for them or directly taking care of them.

    You're gonna tell me I have "no clue" about childcare because in addition to my responsibilities as a father I also work?

    see above post.

    How much time did you spend alone with the baby when you were car free? How many days have you been alone with the baby even with a car? A couple of weeks? How did it go? "have no clue deep down inside" means you did not do it long enough to really know what it's like to do it alone.

    when you said,
    And I didn't mean to imply that all of the family responsibilities rest on my shoulders, my wife and I share those responsibilities fairly equally.


    That's exactly what I mean, you did not go it alone with no car. I knew that about you just from your post, you don't really know what it's like to go it alone with no car. But you are posting anyway. I expected this, it's what happens all the time here.

    That's the point of my thread, How about someone who has really done it? Where are they?
    Last edited by 2manybikes; 02-26-07 at 12:29 PM.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
    winter is comming BenyBen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lachine, Quebec, Canada
    My Bikes
    Mikado kensington 2003, "commuterized" 8yr old Mongoose hilltopper SX, Baycrest Hurricane 10 speed
    Posts
    531
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know if you're going to tell me I don't count, because I am a working father, but you let me know you still want to hear about our experience.

    Both me and my lady are car free, and we have a baby of 11 months now. She works 3-4 days a week, and 2-3 nights a week I pick up the baby from daycare, to bring it back home, feed him, and take care of him. I spend every Sunday (from baby's awakening to sleep) at home alone with the baby, and am responsible for his care.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Elite
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    see above post.

    How much time did you spend alone with the baby when you were car free? How many days have you been alone with the baby even with a car? A couple of weeks? How did it go? "have no clue deep down inside" means you did not do it long enough to really know what it's like to do it alone.
    As I indicated above I am not car free and neither is my wife. My only issue is that you seem to think (or are inadvertantly impling) that only a mother can know what it's like to take care of a baby, regardless of car status.

    Anyway, since I'm not car free I think I'll bow out since I can't contribute on the car free part of this discussion.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Elite
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    see above post.


    That's exactly what I mean, you did not go it alone with no car. I knew that about you just from your post, you don't really know what it's like to go it alone with no car. But you are posting anyway. I expected this, it's what happens all the time here.
    Ok, looks like I misinterpreted your original post, I totally missed the "single" part. My apologies, your post came off to me as slamming working fathers vs. stay at home mothers, hence my response.

  16. #16
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedSnackFoam
    Ok, looks like I misinterpreted your original post, I totally missed the "single" part. My apologies, your post came off to me as slamming working fathers vs. stay at home mothers, hence my response.
    I just reread my post. I could have said it in a much easier to understand way. It really was not clear.
    I should have explained it better. My apologies to you.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  17. #17
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BenyBen
    I don't know if you're going to tell me I don't count, because I am a working father, but you let me know you still want to hear about our experience.

    Both me and my lady are car free, and we have a baby of 11 months now. She works 3-4 days a week, and 2-3 nights a week I pick up the baby from daycare, to bring it back home, feed him, and take care of him. I spend every Sunday (from baby's awakening to sleep) at home alone with the baby, and am responsible for his care.
    This is one thing I am interested in. It's not the same as a wife who has a car. Do you have relatives with cars nearby that help you? Good for you for taking care of the baby as much as you do!

    When the baby was a newborn did you take him anywhere? Do you have a trailer to go back and forth to day care? Do you put in a car baby seat?

    Have you had any sick visits to the doctor? Did you bike it? How far is the doctor?

    Did you have any kind of emergencies or odd trips to somewhere?

    I would also like to hear your wife's comments if she wants to say something. Are you in the city?

    Anything else?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  18. #18
    Daily Rider hairlessbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    89 Bridgestone MB-3, 93 Bridgestone RB-1,93 Bridgestone MB-1, 95 Klein Fervor, 02 BikeE AT, 06 Surly Cross-check, 8? Schwinn Frontier
    Posts
    638
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I grew up car-free with my two brothers in Boston. We lived in the city where the grocery store was an A&P about three blocks away from the house. Our babysitters were my relatives who lived close by so they walked to our house. My mom had a wheeled shopping cart for doing our laundry at the laundromat also three blocks away. We got around the city mostly by walking and taking public transportation. We had a doctor who made housecalls for when we got really sick. Our dentists were all within walking distance of our apartment. For airport trips and emergency rides we called taxis. My mom worked a 'normal' 40 hour week while my dad worked a six day 12-hour week so she had to commute to work by bus/train, grocery shop, cook, clean, and take care of three kids. All without a car. As kids we didn't miss the whole car thing since people in the city rarely drive cars except to escape the city.

  19. #19
    winter is comming BenyBen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lachine, Quebec, Canada
    My Bikes
    Mikado kensington 2003, "commuterized" 8yr old Mongoose hilltopper SX, Baycrest Hurricane 10 speed
    Posts
    531
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    This is one thing I am interested in. It's not the same as a wife who has a car. Do you have relatives with cars nearby that help you? Good for you for taking care of the baby as much as you do!
    I have relatives that sometimes pick us up, but it's mostly when we visit relatives that live outside town. Our day to day life is handled without a car. We keep in good relation with the neighbors, but have never had to ask for a ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    When the baby was a newborn did you take him anywhere? Do you have a trailer to go back and forth to day care? Do you put in a car baby seat?
    2 days after we were out of the hospital, we took the baby out and we went to the restaurant. We also went shopping and other things like that. We used a baby carrier (which we still use) to carry the baby in front of us, allowing us the use of both hands. We don't use a trailer yet, but plan to possibly use one sometimes this summer. I leave from work by bike to go to the daycare, then I walk with the baby home.

    We have a car seat, which we use on the occasions when we use a cab, or lifts from relatives.

    Our main mode of transportation while with the baby is a mix of BMW (Bus Metro Walk). I must mention the baby carrier again, because without it I don't think this would be so easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    Have you had any sick visits to the doctor? Did you bike it? How far is the doctor?
    We've been to the doctor for planned visits, as well as 1 or 2 unplanned. We used the bus or cab to take us there, the doctor is about 3-4km away.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    Did you have any kind of emergencies or odd trips to somewhere?
    No real emergencies, but we've used a cab on a couple occasions. We keep some money available at all time for emergency cab rides. Odd trips to places, all the time, but we've gotten to be experts at prepping up to leave in no time, and correspond with transit.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    I would also like to hear your wife's comments if she wants to say something. Are you in the city?
    Anything else?
    I'll ask her if she's interested. We are in the city yes.

  20. #20
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BenyBen
    I have relatives that sometimes pick us up, but it's mostly when we visit relatives that live outside town. Our day to day life is handled without a car. We keep in good relation with the neighbors, but have never had to ask for a ride. 2 days after we were out of the hospital, we took the baby out and we went to the restaurant. We also went shopping and other things like that. We used a baby carrier (which we still use) to carry the baby in front of us, allowing us the use of both hands. We don't use a trailer yet, but plan to possibly use one sometimes this summer. I leave from work by bike to go to the daycare, then I walk with the baby home.We have a car seat, which we use on the occasions when we use a cab, or lifts from relatives.Our main mode of transportation while with the baby is a mix ofBMW (Bus Metro Walk). I must mention the baby carrier again, because without it I don't think this would be so easy. We've been to the doctor for planned visits, as well as 1 or 2 unplanned. We used the bus or cab to take us there, the doctor is about 3-4km away.No real emergencies, but we've used a caon a couple occasions. We keep some money available at all time for emergency cab rides. Odd trips to places, all the time, but we've gotten to be experts at prepping up to leave in no time, and correspond with transit.I'll ask her if she's interested. We are in the city yes.
    Sounds like you are very well prepared. Sounds like the physical lay out of the neighborhood helps too.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  21. #21
    pj7
    pj7 is offline
    On Sabbatical
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When me and my brothers were young, my parents were car free. But it wasn't out of choice but rather out of necessity, we were very poor.
    I grew up on a farm in eastern Kentucky. It was a rather large tobacco farm and much of the land had been strip mined for coal and recalimed well before I was born. Though I do have memories of one certain mountain still being stripped up until Iwas 10 or so.
    the farm housed my immediate family (my mother, father, and to brothers) in a house that my father and his brothers built. It started out as a small trailer and the house was built around it, room by room, bit by bit, and finally they just pulled the trailer out of it and the house still stood. some of the rooms never really had any *real* flooring. the farm also housed several other family members; autns, uncles, cousins, and the like. In total there were about 5 houses and 3 or 4 mobile homes on the land. We worked all year 'round raising tobacco to be sold at auction. He had some land set aside for growing food for the family. There was also a small "meathouse", which was a building with saws and such for slaughtering and processing farm animals (which we raised) and animals for neighboring farms, as well as animals harvested during hunting for both our family and surrounding ones. I could go on and on telling you about how we had running water thru aquaduct systems built by my grandfather and how the only electricity we had (sometimes) was from generators and the like, but I'll get back to the point.
    There were only three vehicles on the entire farm, and two of those were tractors. there was one truck wheich belonged to my uncle. That truck was used for farming duties and a once-in-a-blue-moon run to the store (which was 15 miles away) to pick up provisions.
    There was a doctor who would come visit us once a month to provide free medical care to underprivilaged children, which we were, and we were picked up for school by bus. We'd have to walk about 3 miles to get out of the hollar (hollow for you city folk) and wait for a school bus from Wolf county, which would take us 10 miles and drop us of at the Breathitt county line for another school bus to take us into Breathitt where we went to school. If that doesn't make sense then don't worry, it still confuses me from time to time.
    during my 12 years on that farm we lived car free. In the case of an emergency we'd take a tractor to another farm if my uncle was gone with the truck or it was broken down. We only had 2 or 3 such times when that happened.
    I guess you couldn't say we were 100% car free, but one car shared between 25 people or so is about as close as most people can get. Hell, when I was young, and school let out for the summer, that was the last time I'd see pavement until school started again.

  22. #22
    winter is comming BenyBen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lachine, Quebec, Canada
    My Bikes
    Mikado kensington 2003, "commuterized" 8yr old Mongoose hilltopper SX, Baycrest Hurricane 10 speed
    Posts
    531
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    Sounds like you are very well prepared. Sounds like the physical lay out of the neighborhood helps too.

    We weren't prepared like this at first, so it took some trial and errors. About physical layout, we chose to live where we are because it is serviced by public transit well enough. For daycare, we had to search for a long time before finding what we needed. If we had a car we might have settled sooner for something farther out

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •