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  1. #1
    Guy on a Bike TreeUnit's Avatar
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    A fun little math project

    I did a quick estimate of yearly car cost vs. bike cost

    Assuming one travels 10 mi a day on a 20mpg vehicle, and works 250 days out of the year

    250x10 = 2500 mi/year
    /25mpg x 2.00/gal of gas = $200/year for gas

    A car payment ~ $100/mo = $1200/year

    Car insurance ~ $800/ year (someone call me on this if it seems to high or low)

    =2200/year

    This figure does not include trips or maintainence

    Compare to a decent bike which costs, oh lets say $500

    bottom line:
    it would be cheaper to have your bike stolen 4 times a year than it would be to own a car

  2. #2
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TreeUnit

    bottom line:
    it would be cheaper to have your bike stolen 4 times a year than it would be to own a car
    Just think of the savings with a $50 U lock. You'd only need 2 or 3 bikes a year.

  3. #3
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    TreeUnit,
    I think you need to up your car payment a bit... the average is about $378 the last one I had was on a used Ranger and it was $154 and that was 10 years ago And about those bike prices... I lusted after a Breezer...they run about $900 for the top of the line so I guess I would have to be extra careful to keep it locked up. In reality, I bought me a decent used German commuter for about $175, it came loaded with fenders, generator hub, good lights, racks and a nice upright riding position. Only thing I plan on swapping out is the seat and seat post. I want a Brooks and a non-suspension seat post on it. But irregardless you are on the right track!

    Aaron
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    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
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  4. #4
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TreeUnit
    I did a quick estimate of yearly car cost vs. bike cost

    Assuming one travels 10 mi a day on a 20mpg vehicle, and works 250 days out of the year
    Why not assume travelling only 2 miles a day travel by car? That will make your comparison even better!

  5. #5
    Erect member since 1953 cccorlew's Avatar
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    gas here is over 3 bucks a gallon.
    I'm not car free, but I tried to start the Miata the other day and the battery had gone dead. I guess I hadn't used it yet this year.
    But I'm not sure I'm saving money. I keep buying cold weather bike clothes and stuff...
    But I feel a ton better, and teh gas companies aren't getting my $$
    WANTED: Not a darn thing. I've got it all. Life is good.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
    Why not assume travelling only 2 miles a day travel by car? That will make your comparison even better!
    Well if we want to keep playing with the averages according to what I can find the average commute is 16 miles one way and takes 27 minutes. Obviously YMMV

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

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    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
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  7. #7
    Avatar out of order. MarkS's Avatar
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    Actually what your figures show is that gas prices are not a compelling reason for people to switch to cycling or even better mileage automobiles. $200 here would be a quarter to a fifth of what most people spend for a single month's rent.

    Assuming that you have to keep a vehicle around for occasional use, and that, like a lot of people, you have an older car which has been paid off ... the cost savings are even smaller. Then factor in new wheelsets every 5000 - 1000 miles, new tires every 3000 miles, brake pads, chains, tune-ups, convenience packaged road food ... only the insurance tips things toward the bike side. And some people want bikes to be registered.
    Cars kill 45,000 Americans every year.
    This is like losing a war every year, except without the parades.

  8. #8
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc
    Well if we want to keep playing with the averages according to what I can find the average commute is 16 miles one way and takes 27 minutes. Obviously YMMV
    And another little tidbit to consider from the believe it or don't department: Some families use their car for more than just commuting once a day. Even if some simple folk would consider those extra trips and reasons "unnecessary" or "wasteful."

  9. #9
    not a role model JeffS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc
    Well if we want to keep playing with the averages according to what I can find the average commute is 16 miles one way and takes 27 minutes. Obviously YMMV

    Aaron
    Don't feed the troll... he likes it too much.

  10. #10
    Villainous huerro's Avatar
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    There's no question that commuting by bike is cheaper. Your calculations are low for car ownership, but I think they are also low for bike cost. I think you need to factor in time and its value/cost. For many, myself included it is faster and easier to commute by bike than by automobile, but many have much longer commutes on a bike than in a car and don't have the means to pay for a home or apartment 15 minutes from their work, even with the monney they might save by not owning a car.

    If someone's cycle commute means that they have to pay for an extra hour of daycare each day, it can add quite a bit, just as an example. Also, someone with lots of disposable income might gladly part with $3000 a year to have an extra hour each day with her children.


    Of course, it's good to point out the financial benefits of riding over driving, but these benefits are (obviously) not important to everyone and some would see less financial benefit than you might expect.
    There are also some hidden financial benefits in cycling. How much does a cycle commuter save in health care over the long run than a driver? I don't know, but I'm sure it's significant.

  11. #11
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huerro
    Of course, it's good to point out the financial benefits of riding over driving, but these benefits are (obviously) not important to everyone and some would see less financial benefit than you might expect.
    There are also some hidden financial benefits in cycling. How much does a cycle commuter save in health care over the long run than a driver? I don't know, but I'm sure it's significant.
    As you move to cycling as the primary means of transport, some additional financial side-effects occur. Now, for example, you can't go on one of those indiscriminate purchasing trips where you fill up your car trunk with merchanidse. You need to think each big item carefully. Do I really need this? Over time, this should lead to a considerable cash savings, although at first it seems like a bad limitation.

  12. #12
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huerro
    How much does a cycle commuter save in health care over the long run than a driver? I don't know, but I'm sure it's significant.
    assuming that cycle commuters are getting exercise by cycling is about as correct as assuming people who drive cars don't exercise.
    Weather today: Hot. Humid. Potholes.

  13. #13
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    assuming that cycle commuters are getting exercise by cycling is about as correct as assuming people who drive cars don't exercise.
    It seems safe to assume that bike commuters get more exercise than cagers. How could they cycle and not get exerise?

    And how do you figure that cagers get exercise while they're commuting? Kegels?


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  14. #14
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkS
    Actually what your figures show is that gas prices are not a compelling reason for people to switch to cycling or even better mileage automobiles. Blah, blah, blah......
    Your avatar sucks.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  15. #15
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    It seems safe to assume that bike commuters get more exercise than cagers. How could they cycle and not get exerise?

    And how do you figure that cagers get exercise while they're commuting? Kegels?
    why?

    What's to say that cager doesn't train for marathons? All exercise does not happen while commuting.
    I certainly don't consider my commute exercise. 5 miles, very few hills, I average 15 mph. I could go faster, I could take a longer route, but I don't. I commute to get where I'm going. Very often, when I arrive, my heart rate is below 100. All I've done is breathe in exhaust fumes.
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  16. #16
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    why?

    What's to say that cager doesn't train for marathons? All exercise does not happen while commuting.
    I certainly don't consider my commute exercise. 5 miles, very few hills, I average 15 mph. I could go faster, I could take a longer route, but I don't. I commute to get where I'm going. Very often, when I arrive, my heart rate is below 100. All I've done is breathe in exhaust fumes
    .
    One reason your HR stays below 100 is that you're probably already in good shape. But your daily commute is still more exercise than the average american gets in a whole week. It's enough exercise to reduce risk of heart attack and diabetes, and even lower blood pressure and blood sugars. It's also enough to lose you about 10 pounds a year if you eat the same amount.

    Exercise is not all or nothing. You don't have to train for a marathon to see a lot of benefits. 30 minutes/day of moderate exercise is beneficial for a thin person. 60 to 90 minutes is better for those (most of us) who have weight problems. There are many large sample studies showing these benefits.


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  17. #17
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    why?

    What's to say that cager doesn't train for marathons? All exercise does not happen while commuting.
    I certainly don't consider my commute exercise. 5 miles, very few hills, I average 15 mph. I could go faster, I could take a longer route, but I don't. I commute to get where I'm going. Very often, when I arrive, my heart rate is below 100. All I've done is breathe in exhaust fumes.
    But at least you are moving and keeping the blood pumping. There was a study a while back that hooked up commuting cagers to a EKG and they were going through some major stress while driving...I would be willing to bet that your blood pressure is a lot lower than the average car commuter. Some of them may well be of the athletic bent, but a lot I have seen are obese and can't walk across a parking lot without wheezing. You are way ahead of those people, just buy riding that 30 minutes or so a day.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

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  18. #18
    Villainous huerro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    It seems safe to assume that bike commuters get more exercise than cagers. How could they cycle and not get exerise? [/URL]?[/I]
    Perhaps some sort of m c escher commute that is downhill for the whole round trip. Sometimes I wouldn't mind one of those.

  19. #19
    Villainous huerro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    why?

    What's to say that cager doesn't train for marathons? All exercise does not happen while commuting.
    I certainly don't consider my commute exercise. 5 miles, very few hills, I average 15 mph. I could go faster, I could take a longer route, but I don't. I commute to get where I'm going. Very often, when I arrive, my heart rate is below 100. All I've done is breathe in exhaust fumes.
    You seem to confuse exercise with training.

    From the CDC:

    Quote Originally Posted by CDC
    Adults should strive to meet either of the following physical activity recommendations.

    * Adults should engage in moderate-intensity physical activities for at least 30 minutes on 5 or more days of the week.
    - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American College of Sports Medicine

    OR

    * Adults should engage in vigorous-intensity physical activity 3 or more days per week for 20 or more minutes per occasion
    Healthy People 2010
    Sounds like your five miles (is that one way or round trip?) @ 15mph on level ground is almost a perfect fit.

    Here's how the CDC defines moderate intensity exercise:

    Quote Originally Posted by CDC
    Moderate-intensity physical activity refers to a level of effort in which a person should experience:

    * Some increase in breathing or heart rate
    * a "perceived exertion" of 11 to 14 on the Borg scale
    o the effort a healthy individual might expend while walking briskly, mowing the lawn, dancing, swimming, or bicycling on level terrain, for example.
    * 3 to 6 metabolic equivalents (METs); or
    * any activity that burns 3.5 to 7 Calories per minute (kcal/min)
    A commute of 7-10 miles five days a week pretty much guarantees that you are getting your recommended exercies. Driving to work guarantees no such thing.

  20. #20
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huerro
    You seem to confuse exercise with training.

    From the CDC:



    Sounds like your five miles (is that one way or round trip?) @ 15mph on level ground is almost a perfect fit.

    Here's how the CDC defines moderate intensity exercise:



    A commute of 7-10 miles five days a week pretty much guarantees that you are getting your recommended exercies. Driving to work guarantees no such thing.
    guarantees.

    I think the correlation between people who choose to be car free and people who are fit is a reverse of what you people are thinking. Hugely obese people will, in general, not consider biking a possibility. Fit, or at least able, people would.

    I still don't understand why driving to work precludes a person from engaging in a 3-mile run every morning. You people (and by that, I mean most people in this forum) CONTINUOUSLY vilify drivers as if there is nothing good about them or their transportation. My god, if only I had the freedom to be so elitist about my lifestyle.
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  21. #21
    Villainous huerro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    guarantees.

    I think the correlation between people who choose to be car free and people who are fit is a reverse of what you people are thinking. Hugely obese people will, in general, not consider biking a possibility. Fit, or at least able, people would.
    Again, you seem to not be getting my point. Perhaps I'm not being clear. In my original post I did not mean to suggest something along the lines of "if those fatties would just ride a bike, everything would be sunshine and puppy dogs." Rather, commuting by bike is a way for someone to stay healthy and avoid high healthcare costs. Yes, overweight people will see a health benefit from biking to work. A person that is at a healthy weight will also see health benefits from cycling. Perhaps the biggest is that such a person will be less likely to become obese or develop many other health problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    I still don't understand why driving to work precludes a person from engaging in a 3-mile run every morning.
    I've not read any comment in this thread that suggested that "driving to work precludes a person from engaging in a 3-mile run every morning." I'm sure you would agree that most do not run 3 miles every morning. In fact according to the CDC, in 2001, only 45.4% of adults met the agency's minimum exercise recommendations. However, as I showed in my last post, everyone who commutes a minimum of 30 minutes round trip on flat ground five days each week meets those minimum recommendations.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eatadonut
    You people (and by that, I mean most people in this forum) CONTINUOUSLY vilify drivers as if there is nothing good about them or their transportation. My god, if only I had the freedom to be so elitist about my lifestyle.
    We'll have to just disagree on this one. I've read many posts on here offering encouragement and showing admiration for car-lite people and families. Read through this thread for some examples: One Vehicle per family. In fact, if you'll go back to my first post (I know you did not accuse me, personally, of villifying cars and drivers), you will see that I showed reasons why many people might choose to drive.

  22. #22
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huerro
    There are also some hidden financial benefits in cycling. How much does a cycle commuter save in health care over the long run than a driver? I don't know, but I'm sure it's significant.
    This is the quote I think about. In order for there to be a 'significant' savings in health care costs, one must assume that a significant portion of drivers are getting significantly less exercise than the mininum. If nearly 50% of people are meeting the minimum, then there can't be that huge a difference between someone who (as their only form of exercise) has a 5 mile easy commute, and someone who drives.
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  23. #23
    gwd
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    It seems safe to assume that bike commuters get more exercise than cagers. How could they cycle and not get exerise?

    And how do you figure that cagers get exercise while they're commuting? Kegels?
    Roody, on this thread the car culture gets surreal in its defense of the indefensible. Kegel. I haven't heard that since birthing class. I'll ride the long way home today and try the Kegel exercise while pedaling uphill to make sure my exercise is on par with the cagers.

  24. #24
    Villainous huerro's Avatar
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    A little exercise goes a long way. Let's do some math ourselves.

    According to the CDC:

    64% of the adult population is overweight or obese. Obesity related medical expenses reached $73 Billion in 2003. Of this 39 Billion (or $175 per citizen) is payed by taxpayers. We won't count that. That leaves $34 Billion that is paid by the obese themselves.

    We're just estimating here so these numbers are far from perfect. Let's say that the 1/2 of the population (112 million of 224 million total) that gets its recommended exercise isn't paying these medical costs (other than the ones that come out of their taxes.) $34 billion dollars split among 112 million people comes out to an average of $303 dollars per year that obese people pay for medical care directly related to their obesity (again, not including the part that comes out of their taxes).

    By staying fit, people save an average of $303 each year in medical bills. So, if riding keeps you from getting fat, it saves you $303 yearly in direct medical costs.

    We said that about 45% of the population gets their exercise and 64% of the population is overweight or obese. So, about 20% of the total get their exercise but are still fat. We'll say that this is true of cycle commuters as well. That leaves 80% who are fit, of whom 64% would otherwise be overweight or obese for a total of 54% who would be overweight or obese but are not becuase they commute by bicycle and 36% who would be fit even if they didn't cycle to work.

    So slightly less than half of all cycle commuters won't save anything and half will save $303 per year. So the average is right around $150 per year. It's 7% of Tree Unit's orginal calculation, significant.

    The more people who do it, the more it will cut into that $175 that we all pay each year in taxes for medical expenses directly related to obesity.

    According to this article in the journal Pharmoeconomics, the indirect costs add another 50% to the total cost of obesity. I assume most of this is borne by employers and the economy in general.

  25. #25
    Avatar out of order. MarkS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    Your avatar sucks.
    Really? Somehow your comments seem out of character.

    So what's wrong with the avatar? I was thinking of it more as ironic, but I suppose some people could take it literally. It was taken from a real sign on a road that encircles an historical landmark in Pt. Loma CA. I was disappointed I couldn't just dash down.

    "I felt bad I had a sucky avatar until I met a man who had none"
    Cars kill 45,000 Americans every year.
    This is like losing a war every year, except without the parades.

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