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  1. #1
    Commuter JohnBrooking's Avatar
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    Towing a bike with another

    I could really use a way to tow another bike with my bike. For a challenge, it will usually be a kids bike, so I can't assume the top bar will be on the same level as mine. I'm sure some of you must have done this. So what works?

    Now, I've seen my bike shop guy ride a bike while holding onto another bike next to him, but it didn't look that easy or stable, so I'd rather just tow it. I was thinking about some kind of rack mount that would hold the other bike's front tire on the rear rack, with its rear tire trailing along behind, kind of like a tag-along. Any reason this wouldn't work?

    Other ideas? I suppose a trailer would help too, but I don't have one yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by MadfiNch on Commuting forum
    What's the point of a bike if you can only ride it on weekends, and you can't even carry anything with you?!
    Portland Maine Bicycle Commuting Meetup

  2. #2
    Hooligan Abneycat's Avatar
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    I've done this once. Took off the wheel from the bicycle, strapped the fork to one side of the rack, and strapped the wheel to the other side. Leaving the wheel on would've made hitting it with the heel pretty easy.

    I guess you could strap it to the top, but it seems like it'd flop over pretty easily if not done on pretty securely. At any rate, its not too hard to do.

    Edit: Something like this might help make your life easier too, if you can properly attach it to your rack and if the kids bike will still be able to reach the ground?
    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...Brand:%20Delta

    It holds the fork, so then you'd just need to deal with the wheel.
    Last edited by Abneycat; 11-19-07 at 08:50 PM.

  3. #3
    aspiring island dweller spinninwheels's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBrooking View Post
    I could really use a way to tow another bike with my bike. For a challenge, it will usually be a kids bike, so I can't assume the top bar will be on the same level as mine. I'm sure some of you must have done this. So what works?

    Now, I've seen my bike shop guy ride a bike while holding onto another bike next to him, but it didn't look that easy or stable, so I'd rather just tow it. I was thinking about some kind of rack mount that would hold the other bike's front tire on the rear rack, with its rear tire trailing along behind, kind of like a tag-along. Any reason this wouldn't work?

    Other ideas? I suppose a trailer would help too, but I don't have one yet.
    I've rode one bike, while holding another bike by the stem, like the LBS guy. It's not as difficult as it looks, but you must be careful. Ideally, you want to be riding the heavier bike (I'll explain further down), which hopefully has STI (or the Campy equivalent) brifters. This allows you to brake and shift with your right hand, thus freeing up your left for holding the stem. I must state that both of these bikes were mine and had almost identical stem heights.

    I once hauled a bike, that was packed properly in a bike box, on the back of my BOB. I was shipping this vintage bike to someone in the States, and I had merely procured it for him.

    Interesting sidenote to this story...while riding my bike and holding the heavier Raleigh with my left, I did wipe out.

    Everything was fine, but it just took me some time to remove the Raleigh's pedal from my front wheel.

    It was then that I mounted the Raleigh, and held my Cannondale for the balance of the 10km ride.

    Long story short, I set some plywood across the top of the trailer (for box support) and then strapped the box down.

    Both examples above I rode at least 8km one way. The reason why I attempted (and succeeded) these bizarre acts; as opposed to getting a cab, or bussing down and then riding the bike back - I'm carefree and I love a challenge.

    And I should also state that the time it took to transport the boxed bike, and pick up my other bike (which I've done at least 2 or 3 times), was faster and cheaper than any other means. I did get a lot of strange looks though.

    If you thing about your options and are creative, you'll find a way.
    Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller

  4. #4
    Crankenstein bmclaughlin807's Avatar
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    there are at LEAST 3 threads floating around about this very topic.

    If it's not far you can ghost ride it... like spinninwheels said above...

    Here was my solution... towed the bike 20 miles:

    "There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

  5. #5
    aspiring island dweller spinninwheels's Avatar
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    ^^^ I remember seeing that photo, but for the life of me couldn't think of the thread. Well done!
    Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller

  6. #6
    rhm
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    multimodal commuter rhm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinninwheels View Post
    I've rode one bike, while holding another bike by the stem, like the LBS guy. It's not as difficult as it looks....
    +1
    All other things being equal, yes, ride the heavier bike. But if the second bike is one someone has put out as trash, ride the more familiar, more ridable bike. You can use the second bike, if its behaving itself, to help your balance at low speed. If it becomes a problem, esp. at higher speed, ditch the second bike; just steer it away from the one you're on, and let it go. That should teach it a lesson....

  7. #7
    Pedaled too far. Artkansas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBrooking View Post
    Now, I've seen my bike shop guy ride a bike while holding onto another bike next to him, but it didn't look that easy or stable, so I'd rather just tow it.
    I tried doing that once after buying a beater bike at a garage sale. For me it proved to be very difficult. It could have been the handlebars of the new bike, an upright English-Racer style 10-speed, it might have been the hills, but eventually I ended up walking both bikes.

  8. #8
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    if one happens to have an xtracycle, this is really simple. You strap the front wheel with the middle strap and the frame with the back strap; done.

  9. #9
    eternalvoyage
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBrooking View Post
    ...Other ideas?
    Removing the front wheel, and putting the (now wheelless) front fork inside a rear pannier works. You have to do a bit of strapping, but it's easy. It helps to put a piece of clothing or a towell under the tips of the fork to protect the pannier material where the fork might cause wear.

    ****
    I carried a full-sized bike strapped horizontally across the rear rack. It worked fine. (Using some sort of cloth material to protect the finishes at the contact points helps.)

    ****
    You could rig up an attachment point similar to the ones often seen on car (rooftop) bike racks.

  10. #10
    Senior Member acroy's Avatar
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    hmmm, these methods all look pretty dangerous to me...
    I have to admit, this would be a time when I use a car.
    Or if it's going to happen frequently, invest in a trailer.

    cheers
    beer-bottle target

  11. #11
    Senior Member cman's Avatar
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    For a kids bike I would use this . http://www.trail-gator.com/

    I do it this way.

  12. #12
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    You can just buy a tow bar.

    http://www.trail-gator.com/


    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
    Senior Member cmcanulty's Avatar
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    I have hauled bikes with my bike 2 ways 1)with my plastic dumpster found bike trailer 2) by tying other bike to the milk carton on my back rack. Just get it balanced and securely tie both sides down.

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