Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 43 of 43
  1. #26
    just mumbling mumblesmumbles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    83
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    SF
    It depends on what area you're in. There are plenty of garages in the financial district but parking is expensive ($8 - $20 per day depending on the lot, location, etc.). Most street parking is metered and neighborhoods that are popular to visit (Haight, Castro, North Beach and maybe the Marina) have parking permits that run $96 per year. However a parking permit doesn't guarantee you a spot, it just nullifies free parking time limits (generally two hours). Some housing has a garage but if it's a rental the landlord may charge an additional few hundred a month.

  2. #27
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,290
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedaleur View Post
    VERY anecdotal: The university where I work, in Odense, Denmark, doesn't even _have_ parking permits. The parking lots are never even close to full, both at the main campus on the edge of town and the smaller campus in closer to mid-town.
    That's it... I'm moving to Denmark. I could feel really comfortable there.

    Here's politician Margrete Auken, a Danish politican for the Socialist People's Party and she is currently a Member of the European Parliament:


    Free the Cyclists!
    Several large European cities are - gradually - starting to realise the blessings of bicycle culture: good for the environment, reducing energy use, better health and the auto-mobility of all traffic users. Both children and the elderly can get around if they can cycle safe and secure.

    The city bikes in Paris are a success. In Brussels the bicycles happily turn right at red lights - often on the sidewalk! I cycle myself and it is the most liberating way to get around. And even though the Ardennes mountain range starts in the middle of Brussels, grandma here manages fine with two artificial knees and seven gears

  3. #28
    Je pose, donc je suis.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Back. Here.
    Posts
    2,898
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    That's it... I'm moving to Denmark. I could feel really comfortable there.
    Heh. Two future kings of Denmark (taking little Christian to kindergarten):


  4. #29
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,905
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bragi View Post
    I've been riding all day in Seattle's most urban environments, and found them to be pretty good for bicycling. We have a few bike lanes now, and the culture is definitely very bike-friendly, so it's certainly not a threatening place to ride. There are, however, gigantic hills everywhere you turn. Personally, I like the hills, but I can imagine that they pose a formidable obstacle to some would-be riders. Contrast this to places like Amsterdam and Copenhagen, both of which have enviable bicycle cultures, and are also flat as a table top. I wonder: would these cities be the bicycle Meccas they are if they weren't so level?

    The Hobart area is very hilly too, and I have to hand it to the multitude of cyclists here. I figure they are a hardy breed of mountain goats.

    Fortunately, there is a 13-ish km cycleway along the river that is relatively flat so that people can cycle from downtown northward along that route, but venturing off the path often means quite a climb.

    Unfortunately, I am not a mountain goat. I am a flatlander. So I'm finding some of the cycling here to be quite a challenge ... the hills do pose a formidable obstacle.

  5. #30
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    Two words: San Fransisco. Hilly and dense and good weather--with lots of riders.

    maybe you need two out of three?
    Counterpoint: Minneapolis. We have none of those things.

  6. #31
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,802
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by draguin View Post
    Counterpoint: Minneapolis. We have none of those things.
    Good point. This thread is from four years ago. I don't know what I was thinking.

    I really don't know about bumping all of these old threads, as people have been doing lately. I'd like to think I've evolved since then, or maybe I'm just going senile.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  7. #32
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,290
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by draguin View Post
    Counterpoint: Minneapolis. We have none of those things.
    Your snowbanks are the hills.

    It's crazy to think how hilly San Francisco is, yet how much it contributed to bike culture in the US.
    Last edited by gerv; 02-04-14 at 09:20 PM. Reason: spelling, grammar

  8. #33
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,905
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Given the choice between San Francisco and Minneapolis ...
    I've been to San Francisco and my desire to cycle there is very low. Too many hills, too much city.
    I haven't been to Minneapolis, but I've been in the vicinity, and of course, lived a little further north, and I could imagine myself cycling there despite the fact that winters get cold.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    369
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think topography has a lot to do with who/how many will ride bikes. I live in Portland which is very flat. Add to that the long stretches of bike greenways and bike lanes where you can ride at a good clip for a good stretch before hitting a light or stoplight, plus the mild weather, and you have a good recipe for lots of people on bikes. The bike share programs that are doing well are usually located in flat places. I think hills are a major deterrent for most people, probably more of a deterrent than cold weather (although making e-bikes a part of bike share programs could solve that problem). As for San Fran and Seattle, it is possible to find flat routes there. I biked around Seattle last year on an old mountain bike that was way too small for me riding from downtown to Capitol Hill daily. It's a long hill but very gradual and there's a bike lane. Some of the hills (especially closer to the waterfront) are very steep (but short). I walked my bike up those!
    1997 Terry Classic

  10. #35
    Senior Member Zedoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Boodling the Mitten
    Posts
    183
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When a 5 lane road was widened to 10 lanes plus a median, there was nothing left to stop the wind. That's an icy hammer in winter.

  11. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I lived in Copenhagen for some years and now live in Oslo. These cities have a lot in common, but its like comparing the Earth and Venus. "What exactly happened here?" At this point the problem is that, regardless of topography, Oslo has almost no bike infrastructure, nowhere really to build it, somewhat hostile drivers, and pretty extremist bikers. You might as well talk about terraforming Venus. Maybe the problem started with hills (and ice) but it is now more than that.

    Why would regular people be tempted to start biking a place where literally everything is against them, including but not limited to the hills?

  12. #37
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,802
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For a lot of people the description of a good bike city sounds like the title of a book by Thomas Friedman-- flat, hot and crowded.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  13. #38
    Pedaled too far. Artkansas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    La Petite Roche
    Posts
    12,346
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    For a lot of people the description of a good bike city sounds like the title of a book by Thomas Friedman-- flat, hot and crowded.
    That would describe Isla Vista/UCSB.

    "He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

    Quote Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
    I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.

  14. #39
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,905
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    For a lot of people the description of a good bike city sounds like the title of a book by Thomas Friedman-- flat, hot and crowded.
    Flat and hot maybe ... but not crowded. A good bike city is lightly populated and roomy. Crowds don't make for comfortable cycling.

  15. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    For a lot of people the description of a good bike city sounds like the title of a book by Thomas Friedman-- flat, hot and crowded.
    Can't imagine why anyone would want it hot, that makes it hard to get around in regular clothes.

    1: Infrastructure, 2: culture, 3: weather, 4: topology.

  16. #41
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,802
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trike_guy View Post
    Can't imagine why anyone would want it hot, that makes it hard to get around in regular clothes.

    1: Infrastructure, 2: culture, 3: weather, 4: topology.
    I agree with your ranking. I might flip 3 and 4. But a little bit of good 1 and 2 makes up for a lot of bad 3 and 4, IMO.

    To illustrate:

    Right now, in the middle of an epic winter, I'm seeing how important good snow removal is. The side streets are nearly impassable, but the main streets are great--and the MUP is plowed even before the main streets!! Usually I have to push my bike 100 feet from my house to the main street, but it's clear riding from there to the Rivertrail and wherever else I have to go. So the weather (3) isn't really the issue that makes or breaks bike riding. The main issue is maintenance of the infrastructure (1).


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  17. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    Right now, in the middle of an epic winter, I'm seeing how important good snow removal is. The side streets are nearly impassable, but the main streets are great--and the MUP is plowed even before the main streets!!
    No kidding, in winter bikes are totally dependent on maintained paths, if they are to be a serious way to get around. Preferably the paths should be brushed.

    There are quite a few ways in which snow can torment a biker, I have observed. Slippery is the only one most bystanders notice, but thats just the beginning. I'm pretty impressed how rear-drive cars can skitter across the top of crap that I can't climb without the rear tire digging and scraping for traction.

    Yeah maybe topology and weather can be in either order, I guess it depends on how much of each a person is experiencing. In Copenhagen and Oslo, its mostly rain, snow, rain and snow, and a bit of wind once in a while, maybe with some rain and snow there too. I'd rather bike a big hill in pleasant weather than a small one in the rain.

  18. #43
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,905
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    The Hobart area is very hilly too, and I have to hand it to the multitude of cyclists here. I figure they are a hardy breed of mountain goats.

    Fortunately, there is a 13-ish km cycleway along the river that is relatively flat so that people can cycle from downtown northward along that route, but venturing off the path often means quite a climb.

    Unfortunately, I am not a mountain goat. I am a flatlander. So I'm finding some of the cycling here to be quite a challenge ... the hills do pose a formidable obstacle.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •