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Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

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Old 11-17-10, 04:33 PM   #1
Carley P.
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On Bikes and Rear Racks

I hope this is the right section to post in.

I've been riding fixed for almost three years, and I'm finally planning on going car-free. I've decided to buy a geared bike to make my commutes easier, since I'll probably be riding at least 100 miles a week.

I'd really like a bike with integrated shifters, so my top three choices are a Motobecane Mirage Sport, a Raleigh Revenio 1.0, or a Trek 1.1.

However, none of those bikes say anything about having rear rack mounts. I was planning on buying a Planet bike Eco Rack, along with a Planet Bike Escape Pod.

Here are my questions:

1.) Will the eco rack fit on those bikes even though they don't have rack mounts?

2.) Will a Planet Bike escape pod fit on an Eco Rack, or is it too small?

3.) Do you all have any experience with any of the above bikes, and which would you recommend?

Thanks a lot you all, and if I posted in the wrong section, I'm sorry.
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Old 11-17-10, 05:35 PM   #2
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Hi Carley,

Welcome to BF and LCF.

I just came through Louisville on my way to NC.

I will check your fit stuff for you first thing tomorrow and see what I can find out. I am on a slow air card connection at the moment.

You can mount a rack on just about any bike even if it doesn't have rack mounts you use a thing called a P-clip. But it is better if the bike has mounts.

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Old 11-17-10, 05:41 PM   #3
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Hi Carley and welcome to the forum!

First off, normally its best to post links to the bikes you are talking about so each individual forum member does not have to google all the bikes in order to help you out. Just a tip, you will get more responses that way.

Second, there are ways to put a rack on just about any bike, almost. However, most bikes that do not come with typical mounting points for a standard rack are probably not going to be well suited to carrying a load.

Congradulations on the decision to join the car-free ranks! We all applaud you! Depending on what the public transportation is like, and where you live it maybe likely that about one a week you will have a pretty big load on the bike for stuff like groceries, laundry, or even home improvement stuff. Having one bike that can do all those things is a major plus. I am assuming you already have a fun and fast fixie for when you don't want to ride the heavier bike right?

There are lots of bikes out there that meet the criteria of having integrated shifters and are able to carry a rear rack properly. I know many of us car-free people are using touring bikes with this sort of set-up.

The motobecane looks like it will take a rear rack but not fenders. Does it rain where you live and do you ride in it?
Link: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...agesport_x.htm

Ditto for the Raleigh, can take a rack but maybe not fenders.
link: http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/road/revenio-10-11/

Ditto again for the Trek
link: http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/1_series/11/

If you are looking for something that might be able to take wider tires, handle a load better, and also have fenders consider these the Novara Rondonee or Windsor Tourist.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/tourist.htm

http://www.rei.com/product/744804
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Old 11-17-10, 08:03 PM   #4
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Wahoonc, thanks for the reply. I hope you found some time to check out Louisville for a little bit. It's not the biggest city or anything, but it has a lot to offer if you know the right people to show you around. I love the city.

Zeppinger, thanks for the lengthy, informative, and polite reply. I'll make sure to post links next time. As for groceries and other heavy things, my girlfriend will keep her car and we'd probably make those trips together. I guess that might make me car-light, if we want to get technical. I was hoping to carry my work clothes and some accessories in the Escape Pod, so I don't plan on loading it down with groceries or watermelons or anything crazy. I've just grown tired of having a backpack shaped sweat-stain every time I get off my bike.

As for fenders, it doesn't rain that often, and I would usually change into my work clothes after I got off the bike. On especially rainy days I'll probably be taking the bus.

One last thing. Would you all think the Planet Bike escape pod would be a good option? I thought it might be a smart idea since it seems more water-proof than panniers, and it seems a little more aero-dynamic than panniers too. Unfortunately, my bike will be left outside often, and I don't want any panniers smelling like mildew and soaking everything inside of them. I'm not sure how water-proof they are. If you have any other suggestions of racks or panniers or cargo things, please suggest them. I'm completely new to racks and the likes. Please remember that I'm going car-free to save money though, not spend money.

Escape Pod: http://ecom1.planetbike.com/4020.html

Eco Rack: http://ecom1.planetbike.com/4001.html

Thanks a lot you all!
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Old 11-17-10, 08:58 PM   #5
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I don't think anyone in this forum uses a hard shell like storage container on their bikes. I could be wrong but its definitely rare. Most people just use panniers that can be easily taken on or off of the bike. They have a handle to carry them inside of your work or you can even buy a version that turns into a backpack. As far as waterproofing goes, I wouldn't worry about it too much since you are not going to use fenders and probably wont ride in the rain much. If you do decide to ride in the rain, most panniers come with rain covers or you can just put your stuff in the pannier inside of a plastic garbage bag. Panniers made of corrdurra dry out very easily so there will not be a funky smell.

A lot of people who are not carrying much use a saddle bag which hangs off the back of your saddle. I attached a picture of my bike and its saddle bag. It is made of cotton which is waxed to make it waterproof. I leave it on the bike when I go into work and put a regular backpack inside of it to carry in.

If you want to go cheap and super effective, which is my preferred method, just buy a Wald Basket and use zip ties to secure it to your rear rack. Then just toss your normal backpack in and your good to go. You can use a bungy cargo net to keep stuff from bouncing out. I use this type of system on the front of my bike. Again, refer to the picture. It works just as well on the rear with a little bigger basket.

Wald Baskets:
http://www.rivbike.com/products/show...ts-wald/20-102

Saddle Bag (this ones expensive but there are other cheaper ones!)
http://www.rivbike.com/products/show...-medium/20-132
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Old 11-17-10, 09:55 PM   #6
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That Wald basket looks perfect for what I need, and it's around 40 dollars cheaper than what I was planning on buying, (and around two pounds lighter, probably). Thanks a lot!

I already have a small saddle bag that I use to hold my wallet, keys, phone, a tube, and tire levers. If I could combine that with a rear Wald basket I should be set to go.

Your bike looks ready for anything. I really like that picture. If you're really living in South Korea, that must be an adventure.

Thanks a lot, man. You don't realize how much you've helped me.
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Old 11-17-10, 10:07 PM   #7
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Thanks Carely, glad I could help! That picture was actually take on a five day tour across South Korea. However, I use that same configuration for commuting. My day bag goes in the rear and stuff I need access to during the ride, like an extra sweater or hat, go in the front basket. If I buy a lot of stuff at the store then I just wear my day bag to free up space in the saddle bag. Works great. I love rear baskets though too. The saddle bag just works a little better for the touring that I do.

If the larger Wald basket, which is what I would recommend for you, does not fit underneath your existing saddlebag that carries your essential, consider adding a small and light handlebar bag. You could even make a good one out of an old fanny pack.

Make sure to post some follow up pictures for us after you get the rig all set up!
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Old 11-17-10, 10:39 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carley P. View Post
I hope this is the right section to post in.

I've been riding fixed for almost three years, and I'm finally planning on going car-free. I've decided to buy a geared bike to make my commutes easier, since I'll probably be riding at least 100 miles a week.

I'd really like a bike with integrated shifters, so my top three choices are a Motobecane Mirage Sport, a Raleigh Revenio 1.0, or a Trek 1.1.

However, none of those bikes say anything about having rear rack mounts. I was planning on buying a Planet bike Eco Rack, along with a Planet Bike Escape Pod.

Here are my questions:

1.) Will the eco rack fit on those bikes even though they don't have rack mounts?

2.) Will a Planet Bike escape pod fit on an Eco Rack, or is it too small?

3.) Do you all have any experience with any of the above bikes, and which would you recommend?

Thanks a lot you all, and if I posted in the wrong section, I'm sorry.
Are you committed to one of those bikes? Other bikes, like the Surly Crosscheck or Jamis Aurora, have mounts for both racks and fenders, and they can take wider tires, but they're still not that heavy.

One rack that I really like is the expedition rack by Jandd Mountaineering. It's very sturdy and carries a lot of weight, and it's longer, so if you get panniers or those Arkel baskets, either of which which I recommend, your heels don't hit even if you have huge feet.

I also suggest that you consider getting fenders. My family lives in Lexington, and they get more rain than Seattle in an average year (not this year though). You can't always predict what the weather is going to do, and if you do get caught out, a pair of fenders will transform a rain shower from a total pain in the ass to a minor inconvenience.

Good luck with the car-free/car light experience. Most people I know who've tried it, including myself, have been surprised by how easy it is to get around in a city without using a car. It's as if we've all been brainwashed into thinking that cars are absolutely necessary, when in fact that's not always the case.
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Old 11-17-10, 11:13 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
You can mount a rack on just about any bike even if it doesn't have rack mounts you use a thing called a P-clip. But it is better if the bike has mounts.
Yes, you can get by with p-clips, but if the bike isn't designed for a rack and fenders, it probably isn't designed for round-town/utility cycling. Does the bike have carbon fiber fork and chainstays/seatstays? Is the top tube length set up for racing or comfort? Are you able to keep the handlebars roughly level with the seat?

I agree with Bragi. The Cross Check is a fantastic bike, but almost every manufacturer these days has one or more models geared to commuting and city riders.
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Old 11-19-10, 08:08 AM   #10
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Okay Carley

I finally got a long enough break to take a look at what you are proposing. All of those bikes are in the what I call "go fast" category. Nothing wrong with that, but will they make a good day to day bike for you? You can mount fenders and racks on them...but it is not going to be easy.

I lived car free for several years back in the late 1980s and my two bikes were an old Raleigh 3 speed and a Motobecane Nomade 10/15 speed that was set up for touring.

My minimum requirements for a bike are fenders, multiple gears and a rack or basket. YMMV. In my old age I also have added generator lights so I can take a bike and go and not have to worry about staying out after dark.

The main reason for fenders is to keep you and the bike clean. When I am using a bike for transportation I don't have the time to clean it after every ride, so I want things like chain cases and fenders to keep things cleaner.

I have seen a couple of suggestions for Surly Cross Check or Surly LHT, both are good bikes and may be more suitable for what you are doing.

Here are some questions to consider:

How far is your average ride? Riding during the day only or some nights? Weather? If you ride the bike to work and it is sunny, what do you do if it is raining when you get off? How much stuff do you carry, will you be doing grocery shopping, etc?

OT I have made at least 10 passes through Louisville in the past couple of years coming and going from job sites in Indiana and Iowa and have yet to stop. Obviously I am missing plenty and need to consider Louisville as a vacation destination one of these times.

I am putting a couple of pictures of bikes I have used for commuting/shopping/transportation up for you to see. I like my vintage bikes, but there is nothing wrong with new. You will notice they all have racks, fenders, lights and baskets or racks. I consider them to be my second car and expect them to be able to fulfill similar duties.

The last one is the bike my daughter uses, she lives car light in Seattle, WA. That bike came from Germany, but there are similar ones available in the states.

Aaron



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Old 11-19-10, 08:31 AM   #11
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You've gotten a lot of good suggestions.

My commuter is a recumbent with a rack and fenders and I sling a backpack over the back of the seat. My utility bike is a 20 year old Specialized Hard Rock with fenders, racks and panniers. And I have a Bikes at Work trailer that acts as my truck. This gives me a lot of flexibility.

For water proofing, I often just put my stuff into a shopping bag within the panniers or backpack. And being able to take your stuff into the store with you is important as well.
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Old 11-19-10, 09:15 AM   #12
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The Trek 1.1 does have rack mounts, BTW.

For mounting on bikes without eyelets, the PB Eco Rack comes with some "P-clips" to use instead. They're part # 5 on the installation sheet. If you need them top and bottom, additional ones can be found at any hardware store.

http://www.planetbike.com/files/Eco_...-4002-inst.pdf
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Old 11-19-10, 09:36 AM   #13
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Yes, you can get by with p-clips, but if the bike isn't designed for a rack and fenders, it probably isn't designed for round-town/utility cycling. Does the bike have carbon fiber fork and chainstays/seatstays? Is the top tube length set up for racing or comfort? Are you able to keep the handlebars roughly level with the seat?

I agree with Bragi. The Cross Check is a fantastic bike, but almost every manufacturer these days has one or more models geared to commuting and city riders.
Who says you can't be car-free--and live in the city--with a road bike? Last I checked, the city is criss-crossed with roads. So what would preclude the use of a road bike?

I've been car-free since April 1999, and these are my bikes:





Each one commutes and runs errands, (although the Peloton and the Litespeed don't go grocery shopping or out in foul weather). Each one has a carbon fiber fork. All the bars are several cms lower than the saddles.

What's this nonsense about top tubes?

And before you get the idea that I'm some young buck or racerboy, I'm a 53-year-old man with a bum knee and an arrhythmia. I prefer road bikes, so that's what I ride. Every day. In the city.

Bike choice is a matter of personal preference. The OP has stated a personal preference for bikes with drop bars and integrated levers. I say, respect that.

You don't see me telling people who want Dutch bikes that they should get a road bike instead, do you?

To the OP: The yellow one is the predecessor to the the Trek 1.1.
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Old 11-19-10, 09:50 AM   #14
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Welcome Carley!

I'm in Louisville also, and you missed the fun little event last night, Car-Free Happy Hour.
http://cartky.org/node/562

This is a once a month event. Keep an eye out at the cartky.org website for the next one. You'll meet some interesting people, and see some nice bikes.

Louisville has a number of decent bike shops. Take some time and browse a few of them. Don't get pressured into buying anything yet, but you'll at least see what's out there.
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Old 11-19-10, 10:40 AM   #15
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You can definitely be car free and ride a bike with integrated shifters and drop bars. That said... it's really good to have rack mounts!

I'm a little confused as to why you'd swap tho. My partner's daily ride is a Bianchi San Jose, set up as a singlespeed. Most weeks, he puts 25-50 miles on it. The barrier to putting 100 miles a week on it is him, not the bike. He's just not that fond of long rides. It has a rack, and handles ok with a light load, say under 20lbs. If he were routinely hauling more than 20 lbs, he'd probably want to swap out the stock rear wheel for one with an internally geared hub. Partly a strength of the wheel thing, partly a strength of the rider thing.

If you have a bike you love, I'd tend to stick with it. Most elements of a bike can be changed, so the only time to trade bikes is when the frame is your limiting factor... and given the new bikes you're liking, this probably isn't the case for your frame.
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Old 11-19-10, 01:12 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bragi View Post
Are you committed to one of those bikes? Other bikes, like the Surly Crosscheck or Jamis Aurora, have mounts for both racks and fenders, and they can take wider tires, but they're still not that heavy.

One rack that I really like is the expedition rack by Jandd Mountaineering. It's very sturdy and carries a lot of weight, and it's longer, so if you get panniers or those Arkel baskets, either of which which I recommend, your heels don't hit even if you have huge feet.

I also suggest that you consider getting fenders. My family lives in Lexington, and they get more rain than Seattle in an average year (not this year though). You can't always predict what the weather is going to do, and if you do get caught out, a pair of fenders will transform a rain shower from a total pain in the ass to a minor inconvenience.
Bragi, both of those bikes don't look bad, but they're a little more than what I was wanting to spend. I still have to check out that expedition rack you mentioned. As for fenders, it would be convenient to have fenders, but we have a "Bikes-on-Board" bus system here in Louisville, so if I get stuck in the rain I could always hop on a bus (with my bike). I'm never far from a bus stop. Thanks for your suggestions!

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Yes, you can get by with p-clips, but if the bike isn't designed for a rack and fenders, it probably isn't designed for round-town/utility cycling. Does the bike have carbon fiber fork and chainstays/seatstays? Is the top tube length set up for racing or comfort? Are you able to keep the handlebars roughly level with the seat?
Thanks for the comment, Gerv. As for bike selection, I'd prefer something that can carry my work clothes and a few light accessories, but is fun enough so that I can go on some nice rides just for the fun of it. I'm young and in my early twenties (which means I still have quite a bit of energy), and I'd love to commute to and from work during the week, and on the weekends take my panniers off and go on a fun, fast-paced ride. Also, it gets windy here and I'd like to be able to assume a position that's at least semi-aero.

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Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
Okay Carley

I finally got a long enough break to take a look at what you are proposing. All of those bikes are in the what I call "go fast" category. Nothing wrong with that, but will they make a good day to day bike for you? You can mount fenders and racks on them...but it is not going to be easy.

My minimum requirements for a bike are fenders, multiple gears and a rack or basket. YMMV. In my old age I also have added generator lights so I can take a bike and go and not have to worry about staying out after dark.

The main reason for fenders is to keep you and the bike clean. When I am using a bike for transportation I don't have the time to clean it after every ride, so I want things like chain cases and fenders to keep things cleaner.

I have seen a couple of suggestions for Surly Cross Check or Surly LHT, both are good bikes and may be more suitable for what you are doing.

Here are some questions to consider:

How far is your average ride? Riding during the day only or some nights? Weather? If you ride the bike to work and it is sunny, what do you do if it is raining when you get off? How much stuff do you carry, will you be doing grocery shopping, etc?

OT I have made at least 10 passes through Louisville in the past couple of years coming and going from job sites in Indiana and Iowa and have yet to stop. Obviously I am missing plenty and need to consider Louisville as a vacation destination one of these times.

Aaron

[IMG]http://inlinethumb57.webshots.com/41784/2824109370066886751S425x425Q85.jpg
Thanks for replying, Aaron. That Giant looks especially nice! (It looks ideal for what I'd like to do). As for lights, I have lights on my fixed gear right now, but I plan on investing in a better rear light sometime soon. I usually don't do too much night riding, but in the winter it's hard to avoid it.

I may have said what I needed to say here while I was replying to the other people. You really should visit sometime!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsl View Post
Who says you can't be car-free--and live in the city--with a road bike? Last I checked, the city is criss-crossed with roads. So what would preclude the use of a road bike?

I've been car-free since April 1999, and these are my bikes:





Each one commutes and runs errands, (although the Peloton and the Litespeed don't go grocery shopping or out in foul weather). Each one has a carbon fiber fork. All the bars are several cms lower than the saddles.

Bike choice is a matter of personal preference. The OP has stated a personal preference for bikes with drop bars and integrated levers. I say, respect that.

You don't see me telling people who want Dutch bikes that they should get a road bike instead, do you?

To the OP: The yellow one is the predecessor to the the Trek 1.1.
Thanks for the reply, tsl. Those two Treks seem to be exactly what I'd like in a bike (and the bottom two look really great, too). Good for cummuting and carrying a few things, but they still look fun to ride around. If I'm going to stay car-free, I really think I'm going to need a bike that's fun to ride.

That being said, I appreciate everybody's suggestions for bikes. I think it's easy to see they just want me to get a bike I'll end up liking.

TSL, you said the yellow one was the predecessor to the trek 1.1. Did that model come with fender mounts, or did you rig it some special way?

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Welcome Carley!

I'm in Louisville also. Keep an eye out at the cartky.org website for the next one. You'll meet some interesting people, and see some nice bikes.

Louisville has a number of decent bike shops. Take some time and browse a few of them. Don't get pressured into buying anything yet, but you'll at least see what's out there.
Thank goodness. Another Louisvillian. I had never heard of that website until now, but it's now bookmarked. It's a nice site. They reviewed the new bike lanes on Poplar level (not far from my house), and I'm so upset with how bad they turned out. They look more like shoulders than bike lanes. If I ride that road, I'm sure I'll be taking the lane in a lot of areas because the bike lane is small and cluttered with road debri.

So far I've been to main Street bikes in Shelbyville, Scheller's, and Courier Bike on Frankfort Ave. I plan on stopping by Cycler's Cafe sometime in the next two weeks or so.

Thanks for the reply!

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You can definitely be car free and ride a bike with integrated shifters and drop bars. That said... it's really good to have rack mounts!

I'm a little confused as to why you'd swap tho. My partner's daily ride is a Bianchi San Jose, set up as a singlespeed. Most weeks, he puts 25-50 miles on it. The barrier to putting 100 miles a week on it is him, not the bike. He's just not that fond of long rides. It has a rack, and handles ok with a light load, say under 20lbs. If he were routinely hauling more than 20 lbs, he'd probably want to swap out the stock rear wheel for one with an internally geared hub. Partly a strength of the wheel thing, partly a strength of the rider thing.

If you have a bike you love, I'd tend to stick with it. Most elements of a bike can be changed, so the only time to trade bikes is when the frame is your limiting factor... and given the new bikes you're liking, this probably isn't the case for your frame.
My fixed gear is an older cheap conversion. My dad gave me the bike three years ago, but the gears were rusted and in bad condition, so I just went fixed with it since it seemed to be cheaper than restoring it the right way. I love(d) riding fixed for fun, but as a daily thing it gets old. Going up hills is difficult and going down hills is even worse because the faster you go, the faster you have to pedal. Also, my cranks aren't going to last much longer, and if I wanted to change to single speed I'd have to get an entirely new wheel. It's just not worth the trouble for how impractical it is in the first place.

I plan on keeping my fixed gear for a secondary bike, in case my future bike is in the shop or something. It's also nice to have an extra bike so your friends without bikes can go on bike rides with you.

Thanks for the suggestion, though. I'm commuting with my fixed gear right now and it does the job, but it's not really ideal either.
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Old 11-19-10, 03:55 PM   #17
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TSL, you said the yellow one was the predecessor to the trek 1.1. Did that model come with fender mounts, or did you rig it some special way?
Nope, nuthin' special. Rack and fender mounts were standard.

You need to zoom in and look closely at the pic, but rack and fender mounts are still standard on the 2011 1.1. You'll see a front eyelet just behind the skewer, rear lower eyelet just above the RD hanger, and upper rack mounts where the seatstay joins the seat tube. At the rear, you'd use the same eyelet for the rack and the fender. Mount the rack leg first, then the fenderstay. The upper fender mounts go behind the brakes at both ends.

It was last year or the year before when I last actively checked, but at that time all of the big three's entry-level road bikes came standard with rack and fender mounts. As I recall, several of the second tier's did as well.

As you go up the line, they become a harder sell, so they disappear. You'll notice the Trek's 2-series has fender eyelets only, no upper rack mount, and they wouldn't dare waste the grams on a Madone. However, the high-end road commuter--the Portland (my orange one)--has mounts for fenders and racks, front and rear. Its stock "fenderettes" are useful only for a conversation starter. Mine has worn full fenders since day one.
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Old 11-19-10, 05:10 PM   #18
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Hey Carley,

I thought I would chime in again and mention that most of us tend to tell newbies that they need to buy a brand new bike from a local bike shop in order to get a proper fit and develop a relationship with the shop owner who will likely be doing modifications and repairs. However, from your last several post its has become apparent that you know your way around your bike pretty well and you probably already have a relationship with a local bike shop were you take your fixie, if you don't do your own repairs. With that information, and that you have mentioned your budget is limited and important to you, I would start checking out the local Craigslist. Most of us who have been car-free for a while don't buy a lot of new bikes. One of the big benefits of being car-free is financial so if you are confident in your abilities to pick out a used bike that will not require many repairs and that is the correct size for you I would take that route.

The Surely CrossCheck would seem to fit the bill for what you are looking for to a T but you said it is out of your price range. They are Surly's most popular bike so you could get lucky and snag one on Ebay or CL in the near future. This is also a great time to buy used because everyone is selling their bikes before winter hits. If you find something on CL or Ebay you are interested in just post it on this thread so we can get a look at it too!
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Old 11-19-10, 11:55 PM   #19
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As for bike selection, I'd prefer something that can carry my work clothes and a few light accessories, but is fun enough so that I can go on some nice rides just for the fun of it. I'm young and in my early twenties (which means I still have quite a bit of energy), and I'd love to commute to and from work during the week, and on the weekends take my panniers off and go on a fun, fast-paced ride. Also, it gets windy here and I'd like to be able to assume a position that's at least semi-aero.
Your manners are admirable; compliments to your parents! Just one more observation: If performance is very important to you, maybe a rear rack system isn't what you really want after all. (Personally, panniers work very well for me, but they're not that great for performance, especially in a headwind.) Maybe a large messenger bag would be a better idea, a sweaty back being the price you pay for the extra bit of speed.... Then you wouldn't need to worry about rack and fender mounts at all.
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Old 11-20-10, 01:38 PM   #20
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I hope this is the right section to post in.

I've been riding fixed for almost three years, and I'm finally planning on going car-free. I've decided to buy a geared bike to make my commutes easier, since I'll probably be riding at least 100 miles a week.

I'd really like a bike with integrated shifters, so my top three choices are a Motobecane Mirage Sport, a Raleigh Revenio 1.0, or a Trek 1.1.

However, none of those bikes say anything about having rear rack mounts. I was planning on buying a Planet bike Eco Rack, along with a Planet Bike Escape Pod.

Here are my questions:

1.) Will the eco rack fit on those bikes even though they don't have rack mounts?

2.) Will a Planet Bike escape pod fit on an Eco Rack, or is it too small?

3.) Do you all have any experience with any of the above bikes, and which would you recommend?

Thanks a lot you all, and if I posted in the wrong section, I'm sorry.
Why bother even looking at these bikes since what you need for less than 100mi a week is called a "city bike"?? Most city bikes come with fenders, racks etc as part of the package as well as an internal hub (ideal in city use) so you can avoid all this anguish about which bike to buy.

That said, all major bike makers sell their version of a "city bike" and some are really really nice. Check it out..............
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