Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 126
  1. #1
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,088
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Bikes and the economy

    A while back, I saw a piece on the local TV about a new bike trail that went through a small town just north of Des Moines. The piece mentioned that the trail was very popular and a lot of cyclists were hanging around town.

    The big news was that local businesses had seen increases in revenue that were substantial. Everyone in the town was now welcoming this new bicycle traffic.

    This got me thinking about all the businesses in town who served the cycling community. It might be a bar/restaurant close to a trail (as in the photo). In fact, bars, coffee shops and restaurants seem to feel the effect first. But I'm guessing other businesses are affected too. Bed and Breakfasts, hotels, theaters...

    A business that relies on bicycle infrastructure is probably going to have more reliable business than a business that relies on car traffic. Cars can move around so quickly that a business would be steaming one day and -- when a new mall opened -- near bankruptcy the next.

    Do you see any businesses capitalizing on bicycle business in your town? Anything special about the relationship?



    Above is a Des Moines bar that normally has a huge number of bicycles. The racks weren't put there for show. They are normally at capacity. (I shot this at 12 noon...)

  2. #2
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There have been multiple studies done in places like Copenhagen, Denmark that show cyclists stop and spend money on a whim. Face it, ride your bike down a street past a store, see something in the window? Easy to stop and hop off and browse and probably purchase. Drive a car past the same store, if you notice something in the window you have to find parking, walk back to the store, etc, etc.

    I also saw a poster/blog that showing that fewer people owning cars resulted in more money being spent at local businesses. One reason would be more disposable income. Also FWIW a higher percentage of dollars spent at locally owned businesses stays in the community than what is spent at big box stores.


    As far as my community? NADA.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  3. #3
    Fat Guy Rolling dcrowell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Louisville Kentucky
    My Bikes
    Bacchetta Agio, 80s Raleigh Record single-speed, Surly Big Dummy
    Posts
    2,439
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Louisville has a ton of bike shops... probably too many for all of them to remain viable.

    We don't have much in the way of trails - a few that take you through the city, but not near businesses.

    We do have a part of town lined with (mostly) local businesses with a real parking problem (Baxter Ave/Bardstown Rd). Many people visit those restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and other businesses on bike. There are many pedestrians also.

    There's a pizza place that let's me take my bike in. Most of the other places I go don't have room to bring my bike in, but I'm a regular and they help watch my bike.
    Car-Free IT Geek
    My blog: fatguy.org

    Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, 1980s Raleigh Record single-speed conversion, Bacchetta Agio

  4. #4
    Dare to be weird!
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin TX
    My Bikes
    Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    Do you see any businesses capitalizing on bicycle business in your town?
    In Austin, there are a few businesses that feature some kind of positive statement about cycling as part of their image. Mellow Johnnys bike shop says it wants to be a "temple of two wheeled living" and has such things as storage lockers and $1 showers for commuters. Whole Foods grocery has a public bike repair station. The Regions Bank near me has a green bike rack outside which went with their "green bike" advertising campaign a few years back. Last but not least is my local Walmart which has numerous decorative orange bike racks outside which are always moderately well used (and much to their credit they've never kept me from taking my backpack into the store).

    More interesting to me are the occasional local real estate ads I see that say something to the effect of "you won't need a car if you live here, you can get around in this neighborhood on your bike and transit". Sometimes I check out those locations to see if I agree. So far, what I've seen locally is that if car free potential happens to be mentioned as a feature in a real estate listing it's actually true.

  5. #5
    Senior Member KD5NRH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Stephenville TX
    Posts
    1,611
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Platy View Post
    More interesting to me are the occasional local real estate ads I see that say something to the effect of "you won't need a car if you live here, you can get around in this neighborhood on your bike and transit".
    Mineral Wells has had that for years.


    No...wait...in MW it's just a matter of not being able to keep a car from being stolen long enough to get any use out of it. Slight difference there.

  6. #6
    Dare to be weird!
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin TX
    My Bikes
    Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by KD5NRH View Post
    Mineral Wells has had that for years.


    No...wait...in MW it's just a matter of not being able to keep a car from being stolen long enough to get any use out of it. Slight difference there.
    Okay then, let's add Mineral Wells to the "Six Surprising Cities for a Carfree Vacation" thread. You're saying you can guarantee the surprise factor, right?

  7. #7
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,492
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would love to open a bikeable shop alongside a popular commuter route or bike highway. I would make it a "bike-through" with nice shelter form the elements. I would sell the usual sandwiches, drinks, coffee and drugstore items that you'd find in a deli. I would add simple bike parts, tubes, water bottle refills, air hose, and other stuff that cyclists like.

    If it were on a popular route, where there might be a few thousand cyclists a day riding by, I think a store could be profitable. Then I'd take the profits and open a bike-themed saloon right next door.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  8. #8
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I always thought a AAA type service along bike paths would be a fun way to make a few bucks. Or even better yet, have a bike shop and provide a "towing" service. I could envision a fleet of Bakfiets or Long Bikes with mechanics on board ready to help.

    From what I gather in the cycling centric cities like Copenhagen there are small bike repair shops all over the place, similar to car repair shops in the US. At one time we used to have service stations on many street corners, but those have gone away.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  9. #9
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,492
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    I always thought a AAA type service along bike paths would be a fun way to make a few bucks. Or even better yet, have a bike shop and provide a "towing" service. I could envision a fleet of Bakfiets or Long Bikes with mechanics on board ready to help.

    From what I gather in the cycling centric cities like Copenhagen there are small bike repair shops all over the place, similar to car repair shops in the US. At one time we used to have service stations on many street corners, but those have gone away.

    Aaron
    I remember that many of those automobile service stations would also fix your bike if you brought it in.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  10. #10
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,453
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rarely impulse shop when I'm cycling. I'm either on my way to work and don't have time, or on my way home and just want to get there and chill. If I go on a rec or fitness ride on the weekend I often ride my more expensive bike and don't bring a lock. For planned grocery shopping I may bike, walk or occasionally drive, but in each case I go the same stores so my mode of transportation doesn't affect where I go.

    There is a pretty substantial bike store located in the tiny hamlet of Inglewood north of Toronto, presumably because it is right on the Caledon trail, near a section of the Trans-Canada trail, and there were a couple of small town cafes along the same trail that seemed to have positioned their patios to draw in cyclists, and even a golf course had a sign on the trail indicating their restaurant welcomed cyclists.

    Within Toronto there are a few coffee shops, most famously the Jet Fuel cafe, that are cyclist and specifically messenger hangouts.
    Last edited by cooker; 07-18-11 at 02:34 PM.

  11. #11
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    East Florida
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT
    Posts
    1,380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    ...Do you see any businesses capitalizing on bicycle business in your town? Anything special about the relationship?
    The coffee shop in downtown Cocoa gets a big lift from every club ride. They have an outside service window, so it's easy to lean the bike on the wall and sit outside. A couple local shops know me and let me bring the bike inside, so I go back often. Beyond that, I'm lucky to even find a bike rack.

    Gainesville, on the other hand, is very bike friendly, with accomodations like: trails, bike lanes, racks, underpasses, overpasses... It's obvious from the bikes outside every business that they all benefit.



    Great photo.
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  12. #12
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,088
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cooker View Post
    I rarely impulse shop when I'm cycling. I'm either on my way to work and don't have time, or on my way home and just want to get there and chill. If I go on a rec or fitness ride on the weekend I often ride my more expensive bike and don't bring a lock. For planned grocery shopping I may bike, walk or occasionally drive, but in each case I go the same stores so my mode of transportation doesn't affect where I go.
    My point about the economic impact of bicycles is that once you have a bicycle-riding customer, you obviously have found someone who lives in the neighbourhood, who can't easily move to the next mall down the road, who has a stake in the neighbourhood. I've noticed several bar/restaurants near popular bike trails that have cashed in on very consistent bicycle traffic.

    I'm guessing that getting a bicycle locked up to your rack means that you have a good chance at a long-term relationship.


    .....

    A second point is what bicycle traffic tends to spend money on. I've noticed food and drink being the big items. Think of these as your cyclist's gas station. The difference, however, is that while much of your gas dollar goes directly back to Saudi Arabia, your bar/restaurant dollar has a pretty good chance of building up the local economy.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lake Forest, CA
    My Bikes
    Surly crosscheck, Rivendell Atlantis, Ciocc Mockba80, Bontrager Privateer
    Posts
    480
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was on a visit to Louisana in April. On the north shore of Lake Ponchatrain, there is a 31 mile rails to trails route from Slidell to Covington (Tammany Trace, named after St Tammany parish). TT passes through Mandeville and Abita Springs. Mandeville converted the old rail station to a TT trail stop just outside the downtown business district. Around the rail station / trail stop are lots of cafes, restaurants, deli, shaved ice places and several other small businesses that look like they have a wide open door to bicyclists. Same story for Abita Springs. Mandeville is a fantastic town, very bike friendly. I saw lots of bike racks and lots of bikes on the streets around town. I liked the place a lot, but I would probably melt in the simmering summer heat.

  14. #14
    Senior Member trx1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i live within a 2min ride to thge grocery, 2min to do laundry(if need b), 2 blocks from a second hand shop,10min from work. its me and my bike....everywhere!!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Rona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Groningen, Netherlands
    My Bikes
    Pre-Grant Peterson Bridgestone Mixte, Gazelle Champion Mondial Semirace Mixte
    Posts
    289
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    From what I gather in the cycling centric cities like Copenhagen there are small bike repair shops all over the place, similar to car repair shops in the US. At one time we used to have service stations on many street corners, but those have gone away.

    Aaron
    There are 27 or so in the city where I live (Groningen, Netherlands). If you have a major problem, you can walk your bike there with little trouble.

  16. #16
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rona View Post
    There are 27 or so in the city where I live (Groningen, Netherlands). If you have a major problem, you can walk your bike there with little trouble.
    Bingo!

    A similar sized city in the US might have 4 or 5.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dunno about the spontaneous shopping, but the potential is there. I live in Copenhagen and my commuter bike is utterly generic, so I can safely put it anywhere with a couple seconds locking the back wheel. (And people do park their bikes just anywhere they like.) I can park literally arms reach from some merchandise I see.

    The Copenhagen version of bike-centric economy means lots and lots of fairly small stores, with big stores generally being on the outside of the city and potentially a significant expedition to get to without a car. There are USA-style malls (full of small stores) in city centers. I don't know how this effects the overall economy, but I expect that when gas is cheap, consumers are paying more, relative to the US model. Also there tends to be endless boring repetition of chain stores, no single store of which is large. Overall I feel that the selection of merchandise is well behind that of the USA.

    Its great not to have to drive to the store, but there are potential drawbacks. The US-style mega stores are a great thing. Just over a bit of water in Sweden they have significantly more mega-stores, while maintaining interesting city centers, however as I have not lived there, I cannot say if they have a better balance. The Swedes have much cheaper cars (interesting fact: in Denmark the tax on new cars is 175% plus 25% sales tax).

  18. #18
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,989
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    My point about the economic impact of bicycles is that once you have a bicycle-riding customer, you obviously have found someone who lives in the neighbourhood, who can't easily move to the next mall down the road, who has a stake in the neighbourhood. I've noticed several bar/restaurants near popular bike trails that have cashed in on very consistent bicycle traffic.
    I wouldn't necessarily say "can't easily move to the next mall" but "doesn't want to move" is possibly accurate. If one place is more expensive than another place they might still sell at the higher price if it's not cost-effective to go where it's cheaper. It seems most people don't stop and think about the cost of the gas to drive an extra couple of miles to the next mall whereas a cyclist is probably more inclined to think of the time and effort, bike parking facilities etc.

  19. #19
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trike_guy View Post
    Dunno about the spontaneous shopping, but the potential is there. I live in Copenhagen and my commuter bike is utterly generic, so I can safely put it anywhere with a couple seconds locking the back wheel. (And people do park their bikes just anywhere they like.) I can park literally arms reach from some merchandise I see.

    The Copenhagen version of bike-centric economy means lots and lots of fairly small stores, with big stores generally being on the outside of the city and potentially a significant expedition to get to without a car. There are USA-style malls (full of small stores) in city centers. I don't know how this effects the overall economy, but I expect that when gas is cheap, consumers are paying more, relative to the US model. Also there tends to be endless boring repetition of chain stores, no single store of which is large. Overall I feel that the selection of merchandise is well behind that of the USA.

    Its great not to have to drive to the store, but there are potential drawbacks. The US-style mega stores are a great thing. Just over a bit of water in Sweden they have significantly more mega-stores, while maintaining interesting city centers, however as I have not lived there, I cannot say if they have a better balance. The Swedes have much cheaper cars (interesting fact: in Denmark the tax on new cars is 175% plus 25% sales tax).
    Those mega stores aren't all they are hyped up to be. I occasionally shop them, and usually end up ordering what I originally wanted off the internet, because the store either didn't have it in stock or didn't have the specific color or model I wanted. I am almost to the point that I don't even bother with stores anymore. I do still shop small boutique stores that I know stock items I want and will even special order things from them if they are willing.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We're moving from a rental apartment to a condo we own. There are a lot of niggling little details to iron out, ranging from a new washing machine and fridge, on down to tiny details like toothbrush holders and paint.

    Pretty much all the things I want to buy are sold in a big box store. Just... not any big box store that has a presence locally except Sears. And Sears will only sell me the appliances I need, nothing else. My local Sears stores are bikeable, and that's how we made the final call on a washing machine and fridge. Sears is in fact an incredibly bike friendly retailer, and they've made the entire buying process really easy to manage for me as a car free person. For everything else, it's going to involve mail order or a trek down to Chicago, about 100 miles away. Or buy custom made.

    I don't mind narrow choices much. I do mind (tremendously) having to mail order almost everything because there just aren't local stores, or it's a huge production to bike out to the one place that might stock what I need.

  21. #21
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,088
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    I wouldn't necessarily say "can't easily move to the next mall" but "doesn't want to move" is possibly accurate. If one place is more expensive than another place they might still sell at the higher price if it's not cost-effective to go where it's cheaper. It seems most people don't stop and think about the cost of the gas to drive an extra couple of miles to the next mall whereas a cyclist is probably more inclined to think of the time and effort, bike parking facilities etc.
    Exactly what would make a bicyclist an excellent customer and a car-driver somewhat less. Think about it from the vantage point of the store. If you can get those bicycle in, you've got a captive audience... they aren't likely to travel 5 miles over a small difference in price.

    I suspect what a cyclist might buy would be better for business in that there's more margin and more local content. Many of the things that go to keeping cars afloat -- gas, foreign parts, insurance, etc -- those revenues fly right out of the area. But if you sell locally created pies, a cyclist is right there.

  22. #22
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,088
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another point is that if a business caters to cyclists rather than motorists, keep in mind that the real growth area is cycling, not motoring. Which mode of transportation do you think will grow in the next 5 years?

  23. #23
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Found the graphic I was looking for

    Aaron

    ic_city_graph_large.jpg
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  24. #24
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,989
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    Exactly what would make a bicyclist an excellent customer and a car-driver somewhat less. Think about it from the vantage point of the store. If you can get those bicycle in, you've got a captive audience... they aren't likely to travel 5 miles over a small difference in price.
    Agreed, as long as the local business also has the less tangible side of things working as well, like customer service etc.

    I suspect what a cyclist might buy would be better for business in that there's more margin and more local content. Many of the things that go to keeping cars afloat -- gas, foreign parts, insurance, etc -- those revenues fly right out of the area. But if you sell locally created pies, a cyclist is right there.
    True, although here the local nature of the bike-based trade could work the other way as well. If you've got a local business selling pies produced some distance away and a few miles away you've got a local business selling locally made pies the cyclist has so much more work to do to buy the locally made pie.

  25. #25
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,492
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to mention that cyclists csn afford to eat more pie, since we're burning off the calories.

    And a carfree cyclist has more discretionary income for spending on pie and the other nice things in life.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •