Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Trying to live Car Free

    So we just took my car off insurance and bought an older road bike! Being interesting so far and have enjoyed riding around Grand Rapids, MI! A couple questions, the bike I have is a 1984 World Sport Schwinn, from which I understand is an old entry level bike. I have added the a front and back light, lock and a front bag for misc items. Is there anything else that would be a necessary? Also I have been wondering about upgrades to it and have no idea what is needed and what is a "desire". My goal is ride this while I save up for something "better". Any advice is welcomed advice, thanks

  2. #2
    xtrajack xtrajack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maine
    My Bikes
    Kona fire mountain/xtracycle,Univega landrover fs,Nishiki custom sport Ross professional super gran tour Schwinn Mesa (future Xtracycle donor bike)
    Posts
    2,056
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hulfordpaul View Post
    So we just took my car off insurance and bought an older road bike!

    Congrats,and welcome.

    Being interesting so far and have enjoyed riding around Grand Rapids, MI! A couple questions, the bike I have is a 1984 World Sport Schwinn, from which I understand is an old entry level bike. I have added the a front and back light, lock and a front bag for misc items. Is there anything else that would be a necessary?

    I personally would reccommend a mirror of some sort, I prefer the Take a Look mirror.

    Also I have been wondering about upgrades to it and have no idea what is needed and what is a "desire". My goal is ride this while I save up for something "better". Any advice is welcomed advice, thanks
    You say that like there is a difference.
    2008 Kona Fire Mountain/Xtracycle
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    I void warranties.
    Cycling well IS Cycling Advocacy
    Originally Posted by Steely Dan: if you're riding a bike and not having fun, then you're doing it wrong.

  3. #3
    Dare to be weird!
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin TX
    My Bikes
    Hybridized 1970s Coppi road bike; Townie city cruiser
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    An extra inner tube, a patch kit, a small air pump.

  4. #4
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,479
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You could take it to a bike shop and have them see if it needs any repairs or maintenance. You might have to spend up to a couple of hundred bucks if it needs a lot, like a new bottom bracket (the internal rotating parts that connect the two pedal cranks together through the bottom of the frame), hubs, tires, brake pads, chain, gear cogs, cables, etc, Even if it costs more than the bike originally cost, it may be worth it, and you could ask the store's mechanic's advice on that. Unless it has been damaged in some way that 1984 steel frame could last for decades to come, and you should consider it to be "vintage" rather than "old".

    You should get a good bicycle maintenance and repair guide, and a set of basic tools - hex keys, tire levers, floor pump (the kind with a base that you stand on), mini pump (to carry with you), patch kit, crescent wrench if the bike has nuts and bolts as opposed to hex bolts; and eventually as you develop more skills, more specialized tools like chain repair tools, cassette removal tools, repair stand and other exotic equipment. All of it will pay for itself over time.

    If you are bike commuting, fenders, a rear rack and a pannier (saddle bag) are very useful.

    You can ride in street clothes but if you are in the saddle a lot you may prefer to get specific cyling clothing eventually. Many people like to get cleated shoes and clipless pedals, but I prefer ordinary pedals and shoes for utility riding (commuting, shopping) - I find it way more convenient.
    Last edited by cooker; 07-24-11 at 10:50 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,277
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fenders, baskets/racks are always my first recommendations. Keeping the bike in good safe mechanical condition is also primary. Learning how to do things yourself is a huge bonus. Eventually you will probably want a back up bike.

    That World Sport is a great bike to start on. That is actually a pretty decent frame set and is similar to what most of my bikes are. Yours was built by Giant and is CroMo 4130. Here is a link to the original specs. Most car free people seem to gravitate towards touring type bikes or the older non suspension model mountain bikes. With a few getting cargo specific bikes and others going with city style bikes like the old Raleigh 3speeds.

    Keep riding what you have and learning what works best for you. Come winter time consider getting a second bike and setting it up with studded tires.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  6. #6
    Senior Member Newspaperguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    2,206
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Once you've had the servicing done, get a rear rack and some panniers. Racks are not expensive and for commuting use,, you could do well with basic commuting panniers. which won't be fully waterproof but will provide some protection from rain.

    Fenders would be good, depending on the rain you experience in your part of the world.

    One other item is a decent saddle. You'll spend a lot of time on that bike so it makes sense to be comfortable. Talk to the people at your bike shop. They'll be able to find one that fits you properly.
    Life is good.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fenders if you are commuting you will need these. Let me know how it goes. I would love to go car free, but think that I have been spoiled beyond repair with convenience.

  8. #8
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,578
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Congratulations! You got a great starter bike. Keep it in good condition and it should last you for years.

    I see a lot of bike commuters when I'm in Grand Rapids. The downtown and nearby residential areas look fantastic for cycling. GR is a beautiful city, but like most cities it has some serious sprawl issues. I was born there, but they haven't gotten around to putting up a statue or anything yet!


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  9. #9
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,277
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    Congratulations! You got a great starter bike. Keep it in good condition and it should last you for years.

    I see a lot of bike commuters when I'm in Grand Rapids. The downtown and nearby residential areas look fantastic for cycling. GR is a beautiful city, but like most cities it has some serious sprawl issues. I was born there, but they haven't gotten around to putting up a statue or anything yet!
    Let me know when...and if they do. I will fly up for the unveiling

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  10. #10
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,078
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hulfordpaul View Post
    So we just took my car off insurance and bought an older road bike! Being interesting so far and have enjoyed riding around Grand Rapids, MI! A couple questions, the bike I have is a 1984 World Sport Schwinn, from which I understand is an old entry level bike. I have added the a front and back light, lock and a front bag for misc items. Is there anything else that would be a necessary? Also I have been wondering about upgrades to it and have no idea what is needed and what is a "desire". My goal is ride this while I save up for something "better". Any advice is welcomed advice, thanks
    I liked the World Sport. I had a ladies frame version for several years until it's attempted theft made me permanently use folding bikes only. It is a solid, durable bike that will serve you well. It is very adaptable for many types of uses. Upgrades are to adjust the bike for the use(s) you intend it for. So plan accordingly. And do locate a nice bike shop that you like to do business with. Even if you do your own work on it, it is wise to have them as a back up for any reason-like you don't have the time to work on it.

    When you are ready to buy another bike, you will have far more experience and know what you want in it better. It will save you money in that way. And keep this bike as a back up.

  11. #11
    Beer junkyardking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    My Bikes
    2010 Motebecane Track, 2010 Novara Randonee, 1984 Bridgestone 600, 198? Bianchi Columbus custom build, 196? Schwinn Suburban
    Posts
    141
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A lot of people here are are suggesting racks and fenders. I'd like to +1 that, but just make sure they are installed correctly. You don't want a front fender getting tangled in your spokes, and you don't want your rack falling apart with 30 pounds of groceries on it. The prior of those scenarios happened to a good friend of mine, and a busted lip and 12 stitches later she realized the importance of proper instal. The latter happened to me with my first rack, and 30 lbs of lost groceries and a torn pannier later I learned the importance of proper instal.

    As far as the rest is concerned, just start the lifestyle. Everything else you need will occur to you as you go along. I'm sure that you'll be making purchases in a few months that you don't even know exist right now. But that's how bikes work, no matter what kind of cycling you do. At first, you just see bikes. Then you see different types of bikes. Then you see different types of components and accessories. Then you try them out yourself. Then you decide what's right for you.

  12. #12
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,578
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by junkyardking View Post
    A lot of people here are are suggesting racks and fenders. I'd like to +1 that, but just make sure they are installed correctly. You don't want a front fender getting tangled in your spokes, and you don't want your rack falling apart with 30 pounds of groceries on it. The prior of those scenarios happened to a good friend of mine, and a busted lip and 12 stitches later she realized the importance of proper instal. The latter happened to me with my first rack, and 30 lbs of lost groceries and a torn pannier later I learned the importance of proper instal.
    I prefer to buy fenders and racks at a good LBS, and have them install them. This costs a little more (well, maybe a lot more) than buying on line or from a bargain bin, But it's better than buying equipment that will never fit your bike.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  13. #13
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,139
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hulfordpaul View Post
    So we just took my car off insurance and bought an older road bike! Being interesting so far and have enjoyed riding around Grand Rapids, MI! A couple questions, the bike I have is a 1984 World Sport Schwinn, from which I understand is an old entry level bike. I have added the a front and back light, lock and a front bag for misc items. Is there anything else that would be a necessary? Also I have been wondering about upgrades to it and have no idea what is needed and what is a "desire". My goal is ride this while I save up for something "better". Any advice is welcomed advice, thanks
    I've seen a number of these Schwinn World bikes from the 80s and to me they are one of the best commuting/utility bikes you can find. Relatively lightweight, sturdy steel road bikes. You can fit racks and relatively wide tires on them. They are easy and cheap to maintain.

    Get a "nicer" bike if you like, but keep this classic for a backup.

  14. #14
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,578
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    I've seen a number of these Schwinn World bikes from the 80s and to me they are one of the best commuting/utility bikes you can find. Relatively lightweight, sturdy steel road bikes. You can fit racks and relatively wide tires on them. They are easy and cheap to maintain.

    Get a "nicer" bike if you like, but keep this classic for a backup.
    Isn't there quite a market for them right now because they're easy to convert to fixed gear?


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  15. #15
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Burlington Iowa
    My Bikes
    Vaterland and Ragazzi
    Posts
    20,214
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    I've seen a number of these Schwinn World bikes from the 80s and to me they are one of the best commuting/utility bikes you can find. Relatively lightweight, sturdy steel road bikes. You can fit racks and relatively wide tires on them. They are easy and cheap to maintain.

    Get a "nicer" bike if you like, but keep this classic for a backup.
    All quite true. This bike is an excellent primary bike as well as backup.

    I'm partial to this Schwinn World Tourist Model circa 1983-84. Picked it up in great shape for $15 at a garage sale and added the saddle that I picked up for DM5 at a Frankfurt Germany flea market. Keep this one at my sister's house near Philadelphia for use when I visit her.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Beer junkyardking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    My Bikes
    2010 Motebecane Track, 2010 Novara Randonee, 1984 Bridgestone 600, 198? Bianchi Columbus custom build, 196? Schwinn Suburban
    Posts
    141
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roody View Post
    Isn't there quite a market for them right now because they're easy to convert to fixed gear?
    Not as much as there used to be. The mid to late aughts saw a huge inflation in the price of the old Schwinn for the sake of an FG conversion, but most folks have moved away from that.

  17. #17
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,578
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by junkyardking View Post
    Not as much as there used to be. The mid to late aughts saw a huge inflation in the price of the old Schwinn for the sake of an FG conversion, but most folks have moved away from that.
    I can't say I'm sorry to hear that.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  18. #18
    Senior Member Rona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Groningen, Netherlands
    My Bikes
    Pre-Grant Peterson Bridgestone Mixte, Gazelle Champion Mondial Semirace Mixte
    Posts
    289
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome to living car free! It will have it's challenges, but it will be totally worth it!
    Rona

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •