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-   -   Are you considering moving? Where would you go? (http://www.bikeforums.net/living-car-free/919937-you-considering-moving-where-would-you-go.html)

DiegoFrogs 11-01-13 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16211050)
"Are you considering moving? Where would you go?" Yes. Someplace warmer.

I've been pricing different methods of moving. None are cheap for somebody who doesn't own a van. The local mover said to move just ten large boxes would be a minimum of $2100. This move is over 1000 miles. A company that hauls peoples stuff in pods said the minimum would be $1298. The smallest Uhaul van will cost $1350 if I drive it and stay in hotels for four cheap nights during the trip. Once I get rid of the things I don't want to move I'll need to do an inventory and financial accounting of the actual value of these things. If they are less than the price of shipping them then it would make sense to just give them away and buy new things in the new location.

There are two more methods for me to investigate. One is to rent a car one way and pack my things in it. The other is to use Fedex to ship my things. I'll travel via bus. Before I can do that I must finish paring the items I don't want from my storage unit. Once I know the size of the move I'll know how many boxes I'll need to ship. Then I'll be able to calculate the shipping cost.

Right now I'm more interested in avoiding cold weather than having great bicycle and walking infrastructure. I can cope with anything on the roads while on my bicycle. It's just nice to have bicycle lanes and pedestrian bridges. On Halloween night I rolled around town on my Xooter. I had to watch out for ice patches and wet spots because it snowed on Sunday and Monday nights.

PODS are quite expensive. I have used them for my last two moves (which were admittedly the only really "big" moves where I didn't have only a suitcase sized load). The first time I even packed, loaded, unloaded and unpacked all of my stuff myself to save on costs. The second time I packed myself, but hired help at both ends for loading/unloading (both 3rd floor walkups). I paid about $800 total in labor on that trip, but since moving is my least favorite thing in the world, I was happy to pay it.

The benefit to using PODS is that they include like 30 days of storage at the destination with no extra fees. That was really helpful in both instances because I had no idea where I'd be living when I arrived at my destination. I also wasn't trying to make any money off of my moving expense packages, and after taxes, everything was about net zero in terms of cost.

Ekdog 11-01-13 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiegoFrogs (Post 16210992)
I'm expecting a job offer from Malmö, Sweden next week. It's very close to Copenhagen both geographically and culturally. If I go, I definitely won't be buying or bringing a car. This is the most exciting and unexpected thing that's ever happened to me.

Realistically, that probably puts me moving after spending the holidays with family, unless I can grease the skids at the consulate. Only after selling all/most of my stuff in the meantime. To Sweden. From San Jose. In January... I guess I'll know really quickly if I can tolerate the winter!

Good luck on with that job.

By Swedish standards, Malmö isn't supposed to be all that cold and, from what I've read, it's a great city for cyclists.

Artkansas 11-01-13 02:36 PM

I used ABF's U Pack containers to move from CA to AR. That worked out. I saved money by doing it terminal to terminal and renting a truck for a day at each end.

A tip for FedEx. You'll save big by taking your box to the Fed Ex yourself.

surreal 11-01-13 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16211050)
"Are you considering moving? Where would you go?" Yes. Someplace warmer.

I've been pricing different methods of moving. None are cheap for somebody who doesn't own a van. The local mover said to move just ten large boxes would be a minimum of $2100. This move is over 1000 miles. A company that hauls peoples stuff in pods said the minimum would be $1298. The smallest Uhaul van will cost $1350 if I drive it and stay in hotels for four cheap nights during the trip. Once I get rid of the things I don't want to move I'll need to do an inventory and financial accounting of the actual value of these things. If they are less than the price of shipping them then it would make sense to just give them away and buy new things in the new location.
....

I'm tempted to buy a beat-up van for about a grand, move, then sell it once I'm at my destination... if it's still running. A bit of a crap shoot (what if the van doesn't survive the trip?) but so are most long-distance moving options...

wahoonc 11-01-13 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16211050)
"Are you considering moving? Where would you go?" Yes. Someplace warmer.

I've been pricing different methods of moving. None are cheap for somebody who doesn't own a van. The local mover said to move just ten large boxes would be a minimum of $2100. This move is over 1000 miles. A company that hauls peoples stuff in pods said the minimum would be $1298. The smallest Uhaul van will cost $1350 if I drive it and stay in hotels for four cheap nights during the trip. Once I get rid of the things I don't want to move I'll need to do an inventory and financial accounting of the actual value of these things. If they are less than the price of shipping them then it would make sense to just give them away and buy new things in the new location.

There are two more methods for me to investigate. One is to rent a car one way and pack my things in it. The other is to use Fedex to ship my things. I'll travel via bus. Before I can do that I must finish paring the items I don't want from my storage unit. Once I know the size of the move I'll know how many boxes I'll need to ship. Then I'll be able to calculate the shipping cost.

Right now I'm more interested in avoiding cold weather than having great bicycle and walking infrastructure. I can cope with anything on the roads while on my bicycle. It's just nice to have bicycle lanes and pedestrian bridges. On Halloween night I rolled around town on my Xooter. I had to watch out for ice patches and wet spots because it snowed on Sunday and Monday nights.

My daughter refuses to own more than what will fit in the back of her Subaru hatchback. She buys thrift store furniture and donates it back when she moves. Before she bought the car she moved from Seattle to western MA using Amtrak. One of her roomates hauled the boxes of personal stuff to the Amtrak station on his cargo bike and she rode her bike. They boxed her bike at the Amtrak station, check the other boxes in. She rode back to the apartment on the back of the cargo bike, then flew out the next morning to Boston. The place she was working met her in Boston a week later with a van to transport her and her boxes to the new job location. Win-Win.

Aaron :)

Machka 11-01-13 06:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16211050)
"Are you considering moving? Where would you go?" Yes. Someplace warmer.

Right now I'm more interested in avoiding cold weather than having great bicycle and walking infrastructure. I can cope with anything on the roads while on my bicycle. It's just nice to have bicycle lanes and pedestrian bridges. On Halloween night I rolled around town on my Xooter. I had to watch out for ice patches and wet spots because it snowed on Sunday and Monday nights.

That was one factor in my decision to move to Australia. :D After 40+ years of winters that lasted 6 or 7 or even 8 months ... I had enough.

It's great being able to go to the snow for a visit one afternoon, but then coming back to green valleys.

If I were to return to Canada, my first choice would be the southern portion of BC. Not Vancouver, but just outside Vancouver, or Vancouver Island, or further east.

Smallwheels 11-01-13 08:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 16211362)
I used ABF's U Pack containers to move from CA to AR. That worked out. I saved money by doing it terminal to terminal and renting a truck for a day at each end.

A tip for FedEx. You'll save big by taking your box to the Fed Ex yourself.

Upack terminal to terminal for me would be only $298. The closest terminal is 235 miles away.

If I use Fedex I won't be doing the shipping. First I must move and find a place to live. Then I can send for my things. I'll give a friend some money to handle it.

This move might be one extra push to downsize even more than I had intended. I already know that I will need to ship some items. Their replacement cost will be more than the shipping cost and I know I can fill at least two large boxes with these items. If it comes down to shipping items via Fedex then I'll be eliminating even basic items and purchasing new ones, such as pillows and bedding materials. If I had one of those vacuum devices that shrinks such things into smaller size bags I might keep them. More could be fit into each box.

As far as buying a cheap car and using it for the move that would be a good idea if I had a truckload of stuff. Registration would be $350 for an old car. Insurance would also be at least $300. Fuel for the trip would be $200-400 depending on the vehicle chosen.

My few expensive items might fit into just two equipment bags. Those could be my luggage for the trip. That $850-1050^^^ car expense could be used to purchase the other items I couldn't bring along.

Once I sort out my storage unit and have a clue about what to sell and what to give away I'll be able to estimate how long it will take to sell the valuable things. I'll then quit my job and begin selling those items and at the same time apply for jobs in the Southwestern part of the USA. I would be happy living anywhere between the middle of California southward to Los Vegas or even Arizona. I will be applying for tour bus driving jobs. Since I already have training in that field it should be easier to get such a job. If nothing I like turns up then I'll go drive an over the road truck for a while. There are numerous companies that will train people for no fee if they sign a one year work commitment.

B. Carfree 11-01-13 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16212089)

Once I sort out my storage unit and have a clue about what to sell and what to give away I'll be able to estimate how long it will take to sell the valuable things. I'll then quit my job and begin selling those items and at the same time apply for jobs in the Southwestern part of the USA. I would be happy living anywhere between the middle of California southward to Los Vegas or even Arizona. I will be applying for tour bus driving jobs. Since I already have training in that field it should be easier to get such a job. If nothing I like turns up then I'll go drive an over the road truck for a while. There are numerous companies that will train people for no fee if they sign a one year work commitment.

You can get a class A with triples endorsement from Morningstar trucking (Woodland, CA, near Sacramento) and you only have to work one summer for them. Of course, that summer consists of 16-hour shifts with every eighth day off. Lodging, kitchen and showers are provided at the tomato processing plant (where your shift starts and ends). Training typically starts in March and shifts, which can start at any hour of the day or night, are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis for qualified drivers. The last I heard, typical drivers earn an average of about $1500/week.

It's definitely warm where Morningstar operates. Their plants are all in the Central Valley (Williams and Los Banos). During harvest/hauling/processing season, typical temperatures range from highs in the mid-90s to 115F, with lows ranging from around 60F to 70F, although one year I worked for them I got snowed on when the season dragged into November and a freak front came in.

If you stay with the school bus gig, you can supplement your income by hauling for Morningstar during the summer months.

Artkansas 11-01-13 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 16212089)
If I use Fedex I won't be doing the shipping. First I must move and find a place to live. Then I can send for my things. I'll give a friend some money to handle it.

I did that, and my ex had them come and pick it up from the house, it doubled the price over what I had calculated assuming that the boxes would be taken to FedEx.

treal512 11-02-13 08:09 PM

I'm planning to move, but for different reasons. I graduate this spring and will be attending a year-long internship to get my RD credential. After that's all tied up, I'm moving straight up to Colorado in the Denver/Boulder region. But to be honest, I'm not all that familiar with the area. I'd like to move somewhere that's outdoorsy, bicycle friendly, and has a mountain (low humidity) or beach. I've given thought to Portland as well, but the rain bit is a deterrent.


Quote:

Originally Posted by tim24k (Post 16200484)
The Portland area is getting bad also.:( I'm thinking about moving to Green Valley, AZ or Hilo, HI.

I'm curious, how is the Portland area getting bad?

tim24k 11-03-13 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by treal512 (Post 16214244)
I'm planning to move, but for different reasons. I graduate this spring and will be attending a year-long internship to get my RD credential. After that's all tied up, I'm moving straight up to Colorado in the Denver/Boulder region. But to be honest, I'm not all that familiar with the area. I'd like to move somewhere that's outdoorsy, bicycle friendly, and has a mountain (low humidity) or beach. I've given thought to Portland as well, but the rain bit is a deterrent.


I'm curious, how is the Portland area getting bad?

1)The escalating crime rate. I no longer feel safe here.
2)High unemployed and getting worse. If you don't have a good job lined up already, good luck!
3)The high cost of living here and again getting worse.
4)Homeless people every where you look.
I've lived here for 40 years and seen a lot of ups and downs but I've never seen it this bad for this long. And I don't see it getting any better anytime soon. Sorry but you asked.

gerv 11-03-13 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Machka (Post 16211841)
That was one factor in my decision to move to Australia. :D After 40+ years of winters that lasted 6 or 7 or even 8 months ... I had enough.

It's great being able to go to the snow for a visit one afternoon, but then coming back to green valleys.

If I were to return to Canada, my first choice would be the southern portion of BC. Not Vancouver, but just outside Vancouver, or Vancouver Island, or further east.

+1. I'm an avid winter cyclist here, but winters are a lot shorter than I recall in my 40+ years in Canada. I moved here from Newfoundland, but winters have changed quite a bit there. The growing season is a lot longer nowadays and 10 foot snow drifts are a things of the past. However endless weeks of dreary fog... hasn't changed :)

treal512 11-03-13 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tim24k (Post 16214909)
1)The escalating crime rate. I no longer feel safe here.
2)High unemployed and getting worse. If you don't have a good job lined up already, good luck!
3)The high cost of living here and again getting worse.
4)Homeless people every where you look.
I've lived here for 40 years and seen a lot of ups and downs but I've never seen it this bad for this long. And I don't see it getting any better anytime soon. Sorry but you asked.

Thank you for sharing this. It doesn't bother me. Austin is getting bad too. It's to the point that I don't want to live in or around it anymore. I was considering Portland after Colorado, but you make it sound bad. It's not that bad, is it??

Roody 11-04-13 01:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by treal512 (Post 16216770)
Thank you for sharing this. It doesn't bother me. Austin is getting bad too. It's to the point that I don't want to live in or around it anymore. I was considering Portland after Colorado, but you make it sound bad. It's not that bad, is it??

I have never lived in Portland, but I've read that high unemployment has been a problem for at least 5 or 6 years. But people keep moving there in large numbers, especially young people. This unusual situation is throwing urban specialists for a loop, I guess. North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate, but not as many people have been moving there.

Roody 11-04-13 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerv (Post 16215085)
+1. I'm an avid winter cyclist here, but winters are a lot shorter than I recall in my 40+ years in Canada. I moved here from Newfoundland, but winters have changed quite a bit there. The growing season is a lot longer nowadays and 10 foot snow drifts are a things of the past. However endless weeks of dreary fog... hasn't changed :)

I'm hoping for a winter like we used to have, but of course they'll keep getting more rare.

One place I think about moving to (when I retire in 7 to 10 years) is Michigan's Upper Peninsula, most likely in Marquette or Houghton, on the Superior coastline. Houghton was just named a Silver Level bike friendly city, and Marquette also has a thriving bike community. Both cities get 200 inches of snow, which I love.

The only way I will ever move out of Michigan is if I am extradited! :D

Machka 11-04-13 03:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerv (Post 16215085)
+1. I'm an avid winter cyclist here, but winters are a lot shorter than I recall in my 40+ years in Canada. I moved here from Newfoundland, but winters have changed quite a bit there. The growing season is a lot longer nowadays and 10 foot snow drifts are a things of the past. However endless weeks of dreary fog... hasn't changed :)

We had some incredibly long winters in Alberta in the years before I left (2009) ... in fact, in 2009, we had our last heavy snowfall on May 18.

And thank goodness I wasn't there last year, because they had their first snowfall at the beginning of Oct and the last snowfall at the end of April, with temps below 0 on into early May ... approx. 7.5 months of winter. I got the impression from my friends and family back there that they were pretty sick of it all. And after what seems like no time at all, they're back into snow again now.

I could handle Canadian winters if they went from, say, Dec 1 to Mar 1 ... but they just seem to be getting longer and longer.


It rains and gets quite chilly in this part of Australia, from about early-June to about end-Aug, but at least it is green ... and we don't have to deal with ice.

DiegoFrogs 11-04-13 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roody (Post 16217171)
I have never lived in Portland, but I've read that high unemployment has been a problem for at least 5 or 6 years. But people keep moving there in large numbers, especially young people. This unusual situation is throwing urban specialists for a loop, I guess. North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate, but not as many people have been moving there.

I think that's largely due to the expansion of drilling in North Dakota. A boom in an industry like that, compared to the background of a really small state population, makes it look like the gold rush in California.

The downside, I guess, is that it's still North Dakota. When my father was there on business a few decades ago, he stopped into a small barber shop. While he was waiting his turn, the entire town came in to look at him. I guess they don't get too many outsiders!

Artkansas 11-04-13 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiegoFrogs (Post 16218289)
The downside, I guess, is that it's still North Dakota. When my father was there on business a few decades ago, he stopped into a small barber shop. While he was waiting his turn, the entire town came in to look at him. I guess they don't get too many outsiders!

Now they do. ;)

I gather there is quite a bit of culture shock there, old North Dakota vs the Oil Boom.

I-Like-To-Bike 11-04-13 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 16218571)
Now they do. ;)

I gather there is quite a bit of culture shock there, old North Dakota vs the Oil Boom.

There will be quite a weather shock too, unless they moved in from the Arctic; the summers can be brutal too.
The land was good for living Buffalo and not much else since.

jacoblighter 11-04-13 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wahoonc (Post 16211501)
My daughter refuses to own more than what will fit in the back of her Subaru hatchback. She buys thrift store furniture and donates it back when she moves. Before she bought the car she moved from Seattle to western MA using Amtrak. One of her roomates hauled the boxes of personal stuff to the Amtrak station on his cargo bike and she rode her bike. They boxed her bike at the Amtrak station, check the other boxes in. She rode back to the apartment on the back of the cargo bike, then flew out the next morning to Boston. The place she was working met her in Boston a week later with a van to transport her and her boxes to the new job location. Win-Win.

Aaron :)

Cool story! Your daughter sounds like a smart girl. She's like Jack Reacher, but not a man haha.

treal512 11-04-13 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roody (Post 16217171)
I have never lived in Portland, but I've read that high unemployment has been a problem for at least 5 or 6 years. But people keep moving there in large numbers, especially young people. This unusual situation is throwing urban specialists for a loop, I guess. North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate, but not as many people have been moving there.

Ahh, thanks for the additional information. I'm not quite in the position to research where I want to move yet, but this is all good to know.

So are you saying people should be moving to North Dakota? :p

gerv 11-04-13 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by treal512 (Post 16219372)
Ahh, thanks for the additional information. I'm not quite in the position to research where I want to move yet, but this is all good to know.

So are you saying people should be moving to North Dakota? :p

Not you treal512, but I have a list of people I'd like to see moving to North Dakota. I hear there's no Internet there either.

Rowan 11-05-13 03:13 PM

I suppose that opposing opinion has no place in forums like this, eh gerv?

Anyway, some of the reasons for moving can pop up unexpectedly and after the move has been made. It just struck me as I posted in another thread here that I have moved back to Tasmania which relies almost entirely on hydro-electric power.

I know some just have to argue that hydro is just as demonic as coal and nuclear. It isn't. Yes, there are environmental issues on the initial flooding, but the majority of the dams here were built in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and they will continue to produce power well into the future. Tasmania also is a "wet" island, in that rainfall is not an issue and the experts say that Hobart is the only capital city in Australia that is guaranteed to have water supplies.

The State has just banned retailers from issuing lightweight plastic bags to customers.

There are some negatives to all this, and there are parallels between Tasmania's economy and Oregon's.

squegeeboo 11-05-13 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rowan (Post 16222010)

There are some negatives to all this, and there are parallels between Tasmania's economy and Oregon's.

As they say, the Tasmanian devils in the details.

AdrianFly 11-08-13 01:45 AM

I would move right back into my parents basement. Not much to see or do but I could quit my job and sleep till noon every single day.

I tossed that one by the ol man a few weeks ago. His expression was priceless.


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