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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 07-04-06, 04:27 PM   #1
georgiaboy
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Decribe a long distance or randoneurring bicycle

This subject is extremely interesting to me. This niche in cycling is making want to learn more.

What are the characteristics of long distance or randoneurring bicycle?

There are different from touring.

Are there any companies in the U.S. that make bikes like Mercian would sell? Meaning light-weight classics with conventional headsets and crown forks?
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Old 07-04-06, 04:47 PM   #2
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Well, lots. Waterford, Heron, Rivendell....
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Old 07-04-06, 05:08 PM   #3
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My long distance bike is my 2004 Bianchi Vigorelli. It's steel frame, with carbon fork, so it rides very smooth. Specialized Avatar saddle, with a specialized carbon seatpost, again for maximum comfort. Syntace C2 aerobars with two sets of risers jacking them up two inches, so that they are about level with the saddle. Look A5.1 pedals, which have a large platform, again for distance comfort. Then, to top it off, a cheezy BELL handlebar bag, for Gatorade powder mix, clif bars, gels, ensure, bananas, etc.

I've ridden this bike over 250 miles in a day, but I damn sure would never try to tour with it.
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Old 07-04-06, 06:25 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thulsadoom
My long distance bike is my 2004 Bianchi Vigorelli. It's steel frame, with carbon fork, so it rides very smooth. Specialized Avatar saddle, with a specialized carbon seatpost, again for maximum comfort. Syntace C2 aerobars with two sets of risers jacking them up two inches, so that they are about level with the saddle. Look A5.1 pedals, which have a large platform, again for distance comfort. Then, to top it off, a cheezy BELL handlebar bag, for Gatorade powder mix, clif bars, gels, ensure, bananas, etc.

I've ridden this bike over 250 miles in a day, but I damn sure would never try to tour with it.
Hey, thats crazy! I have a 2004 Vigorelli as well. However, I have not made any changes other than a seat bag. I will look into the upgrades you made. What kind of tires do you use?

Yeah, the bike is definitely not for touring. But it will get up and go. I can push the bike along real easy.
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Old 07-04-06, 06:44 PM   #5
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I'm riding a 2004 Giant TCR Comp1, with some Airstryke aerobars being the only concession for randonneuring and long distance riding. I run 23C tires on the thing. I don't change the bike at all, save for removing the aerobars, for the USCF racing that I do.

This is, of course, far from normal.

I think a long distance or randonneuring bicycle is one that fits you perfectly, is comfortable for you during the kind of riding that you like to do with it, and in which you have complete faith and trust. I love my bike. It fits me. I have a lot of confidence in it. We've been through all kinds of crap together and have both come through it relatively unscathed. If I wrecked it, I'd mourn its loss and then get another just like it.

Touring is a different matter. Don't think it'd be wise on a bike like this.... But LD riding can defintely be done successfully and comfortably on a bike that's set up for racing.
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Old 07-04-06, 07:07 PM   #6
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I was on an event last weekend put on by the Randonneurs of BC. Out of about 50 bikes, 5 of them were Marinoni Ciclo's. Its a sport touring bike, steel frame. About as fast/light/sporty you can get while still able to put on front, rear fenders and racks.

http://www.marinoni.qc.ca/html/en_ciclo.html
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Old 07-04-06, 07:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgiaboy
Hey, thats crazy! I have a 2004 Vigorelli as well. However, I have not made any changes other than a seat bag. I will look into the upgrades you made. What kind of tires do you use?

Yeah, the bike is definitely not for touring. But it will get up and go. I can push the bike along real easy.
I just use Conti Ultra Sport tires mostly, because they are inexpensive and last halfway decent. Actually, I generally use whatever tires are on sale, and will last for awhile. I love the Continental tires. Sometimes I will buy the expensive tires, if they are on sale. I'd love to try some of the new 4000s.
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Old 07-05-06, 12:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Octopus
I think a long distance or randonneuring bicycle is one that fits you perfectly, is comfortable for you during the kind of riding that you like to do with it, and in which you have complete faith and trust. I love my bike. It fits me. I have a lot of confidence in it. We've been through all kinds of crap together and have both come through it relatively unscathed. If I wrecked it, I'd mourn its loss and then get another just like it.
+1

And in my case, mine's a Marinoni Ciclo - the "sport touring" model ... custom-built and customized.


But in the years I've been Randonneuring, I've seen racing bicycles, mountain bikes, touring bicycles, sport touring bicycles, single speeds, fixed gears, tandems, recumbents, tandem recumbents, a triplette, recumbent trikes, tricycles (the upright kind), new bicycles, old bicycles, off the shelf bicycles, custom bicycles, homemade bicycles, and one kick-bike. I also know of a guy who rides the STP (not a randonneuring event, but still long distance) on a unicycle!!
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Old 07-05-06, 12:09 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarery
I was on an event last weekend put on by the Randonneurs of BC. Out of about 50 bikes, 5 of them were Marinoni Ciclo's. Its a sport touring bike, steel frame. About as fast/light/sporty you can get while still able to put on front, rear fenders and racks.

http://www.marinoni.qc.ca/html/en_ciclo.html
Of course!! Those BC Randonneurs know a good bicycle when they see one.
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Old 07-05-06, 06:15 AM   #10
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My current road ride has been enlisted as my Brevet bike:
04 Carbon / Lemond Zurich.
Mavic Open Pro Rims, Schmidt Dyno Hub Front
Currently Running Continental GP 4 Seasons, 25mm tires, awaiting some 28 Scwalbes in the mail for the 600k this coming weekend
Dual Schmidt E6 Headlights
Syntace Aerobars
Ritchey Pro Compact Crank, 12-26 Cassette Rear (recent change, got tired of the triple)
Tubus Fly Rack
Ortlieb Bike Box (rack pack) or large Ortlieb seat pack.
LED Blinkies rear, and a white LED blinkie on the front.
Brooks Swallow saddle, although I am experimenting with a Specialized Alias...

This is a standard road machine. When its pouring I add some clip on fenders.
It's limited to tire size, clearance, etc... so I'm building a new bike...


I'm awaiting an Independent Fabrications Club Racer.
Ti, with steel fork.
Long reach brakes, room for fenders.
Low rider mount on the fork for my Schmidts.

Going to be used as a fast touring / brevet machine.

More info on the frame here and here.
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Old 07-05-06, 06:46 AM   #11
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my next bike for long distance will most likely be an IF club racer.

i don't have a geared bike right now!!
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Old 07-05-06, 08:25 AM   #12
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Quote:
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my next bike for long distance will most likely be an IF club racer.
visit IF when you put your order in.
cool folks, cool company.

i dropped in last time i had work in boston. hoping to pick up my frame too, when it is ready.


i've and art / design / architecture background - when i walked into IF i felt:

IF = punk rock + art school + high tech + web design + bicycle craftsman
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Old 07-05-06, 08:33 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmike
I'm awaiting an Independent Fabrications Club Racer.
Ti, with steel fork.
Long reach brakes, room for fenders.
Low rider mount on the fork for my Schmidts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunop
my next bike for long distance will most likely be an IF club racer.
It seems that the IF Club Racer occupies the same slot in the US that the Marinoni has in Canada. There's a pretty good write up about things to look for with an audax/randonneuring bike on the Blayley's website, and it uses the original Club Racer as an example.

I'm planning on putting a deposit down for an ANT Club Racer after I finish my first 600K. ANT, fwiw, is the one-man shop for Mike Flanigan, one of the founders of Independent Fabrications and the original designer of the Club Racer and the Independence (the IF touring bike). It'll be interesting to see if any differences have cropped up in the design since IF and ANT went their separate ways.
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Old 07-05-06, 08:34 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmike
visit IF when you put your order in.
cool folks, cool company.

i dropped in last time i had work in boston. hoping to pick up my frame too, when it is ready.


i've and art / design / architecture background - when i walked into IF i felt:

IF = punk rock + art school + high tech + web design + bicycle craftsman
one of my fixed is an IF. their place is about a quarter mile from my crib. went there to pick out my color.
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Old 07-05-06, 09:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spokenword
It seems that the IF Club Racer occupies the same slot in the US that the Marinoni has in Canada. There's a pretty good write up about things to look for with an audax/randonneuring bike on the Blayley's website, and it uses the original Club Racer as an example.

I'm planning on putting a deposit down for an ANT Club Racer after I finish my first 600K. ANT, fwiw, is the one-man shop for Mike Flanigan, one of the founders of Independent Fabrications and the original designer of the Club Racer and the Independence (the IF touring bike). It'll be interesting to see if any differences have cropped up in the design since IF and ANT went their separate ways.
i looked at the ANT too - very cool! my LBS has a few IF's around, and several of the club riders have IF's (crown jewels and mountain bikes). i really like them...!
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Old 07-09-06, 01:11 PM   #16
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The right bike

The right bike for randonneuring depends on where you ride and your strength.
As Machka said, any bike or trike will do the job.
However, if you are a strong rider and want to keep up with the fast riders, you will probably need a lightweight bike with no excess "luggage"
If you live in an area with few serious hills, your lowest cassette gear will not be over 30T and only a double chainwheel.
Conversely, if you are going to be climbing a few mountain roads, you might consider a 34T and a triple chainwheel with a low "granny" sprocket.
The point of randonneuring is not to finish first (after all it is not a race), but to finish within the allotted time.
Most bikes are adequate for the average rider to complete a brevet within the time--even the Wal-Mart $99.00 road bike if it came close to fitting you. For comfort, you might replace the saddle, swap the pedals for clip-less, buy appropriate shoes, add a speedometer and lights, and install a carrier/rack.
So if you own a bike that already fits you, there is only a few things you need to do to turn it into a randonneuring bike.
In my opinion, too many wanna-be riders get hung up on obtaining the ideal bike. My suggestion is to ride a few centuries and a 200 km brevet on the bike you have. Then begin making changes to improve your comfort and speed. By then, you will know what you personally would like in an ideal bike.
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Old 07-09-06, 10:41 PM   #17
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How many people have success with carbon road bikes?
No fenders except clip on, no eyelets for a rack.
But i know some people use them, how well do they do at a 300-400 km brevet?
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Old 07-10-06, 05:59 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarery
How many people have success with carbon road bikes?
No fenders except clip on, no eyelets for a rack.
But i know some people use them, how well do they do at a 300-400 km brevet?
They work fine. I've been using my LeMond Zurich this year - steel and carbon.
I'm running 700x25 tires, and when the weather threatens I use clip on fenders.




Having nearly finished a Brevet season on this bike I can say that it did fine... and that I see all sorts of machines on the road - carbon, aluminum, racing, full touring, recumbent. They all work - and they all seem to match the personalities of the folks pedaling.
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Old 07-10-06, 07:06 AM   #19
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I have a custom Spectrum Super Ti frame with a carbon fork.

Bold Ti setapost

Koobi PRS Saddle

Campy Record with the exception of the shifters, which are chorus. I switched back to my Campy Triple crank (53x42x30) with a Phil Wood Hub and a 12-25 cassette

White Industries hubs, laced to Velocity Aerohead Rims (off center ofr the rear), Wheelsmith 14g on drive side, Sapim laser spokes for the raminder of the rear and front. All wheels are 3x.

Ritchey WCS bars and stem with a Chris King Headset

Syntace C2 aerobars

Look Keo pedals
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Old 07-26-06, 08:25 PM   #20
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I have a softride solo and have taken it on numerous 160 mile one day rides. It's incredibly comfortable and quick...unfortunately, it doesn't take fenders, bags, etc so I'm looking for a new randoneuring bicycle. Anyone ride a Heron? Frank
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Old 07-27-06, 06:57 AM   #21
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Meaning light-weight classics with conventional headsets and crown forks?
Customized tubing and tig-welding are becoming increasingly popular, but as others have mentioned, there are plenty of "old-school" manufacturers available. Below is a good sample of the new way of doing things.
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Old 07-27-06, 11:32 AM   #22
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I prefer a more laid backc position on my randonneuring bike


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