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  1. #1
    Lanterne Rouge
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    Anyone using Suspension Seatposts?

    I was just wondering whether anyone is using a shock absorbing seat post, and what the ups and downs might be for them.

    Planning for the NY Century, and there are bound to be plenty of cracks, bumps, and irregularities to ride over. Thought my back and backside might be happier at the end of the day with one of these built in. The bike I'm riding is aluminum, and those bumps go straight through the frame.

    So, worth it or not? Suspension post or carbon post (I've heard they absorb shock as well...)?

    FWIW I'm 6'3" and about 212.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Personally, I've never used a suspension seatpost. However, generally it is advised to get a parallelogram type, not a telescoping type.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Neist's Avatar
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    I'm not entirely sure about the suspension post, but you may check on the max weight limit on the carbon post from the manufacturer. They really dont adverstise the fact often, but a lot of manufacturers of carbon parts have a "max weight limit" designated before the warranty goes void. Its usually a lot lower than people might imagine too. I think last I checked on something I was looking at, it was around 180.

    Now, that could or could not be saying something, but if the warranty goes void, I'd be afraid to use it if I weighed over that.

    Not sure if you can easily find them, but a Ti post couldnt be too bad I imagine.
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  4. #4
    so whatcha' want? bigskymacadam's Avatar
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    my bike came with one. it's fine. i'm suure it helps a little to dampen the vibrations. i tried to change it once, but the new post was too short.

  5. #5
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    I would choose a Brooks sprung saddle over the seatpost. I use a Brooks Conquest sprung ATB saddle from time to time. I used to ride a Rockshox suspension post but didn't care for it that much. A sprung saddle is much more effective in dampening road shocks, IMO...
    Last edited by roadfix; 07-08-06 at 01:13 AM.
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  6. #6
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    I have used a Thompson suspension seatpost for several years. Like it. It takes a little of the edge off. I don;t think the weight penalty is that much. Having said that, I have heard from more than one person that a sprung saddle is another good way. Good luck with the century.

  7. #7
    duh-river foe
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    Personally, I hate them. There was one installed on the back of a tandem that I was riding and all it seemed to do was bob and sap energy every time I tried to pull up on the pedals. I had to ride like I was back on platforms with sneakers and I got tired pretty quickly. I would suggest the Brooks with the condition that you'll have the time to break it in.

  8. #8
    Calamari to go cc_rider's Avatar
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    I've ridden several Bike New York tours on the same type of roads.
    Seat post suspension shouldn't be necessary.

  9. #9
    Senior Member mlh122's Avatar
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    the ups and downs are that they go up and down, bad joke haha... well i found that they do absorb many of the small bumps and vibrations, your butt thanks you a little. when sitting and cruising they're fine, but when trying to accelerate or climb they kinda sap energy by bobbing up and down and they're just a little disorienting because they move, mine moved left and right a lot, it had adjustments to fix that but still wiggled about an inch each way. i'm back to a regular seat post and upgraded the saddle. I don't miss it that much.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Fixer
    I would choose a Brooks sprung saddle over the seatpost. I use a Brooks Conquest sprung ATB saddle ......IMO...
    +1

    Love my Champion Flyer. I did a 50 mile ride on it the first day I had it, on an all aluminum bike. I have a B-67 on my touring bike and sometimes swap it over to my mountain bike for a long ride on dirt roads. At my age, weight, and size, I really go for the sprung Brooks saddles, even if they are not for the purists among us.
    Last edited by Monoborracho; 08-08-06 at 11:49 AM.

  11. #11
    jcm
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    My Sequoia came with a cheapo susp seatpost. It seems to work ok, but I'll swap it for a solid with a Brooks sprung Flyer soon. I like the comfort of hide leather and the subtle shock damping of good springs.

  12. #12
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    I have a suspension seat post, and a front suspension on my Sedona DX.

    I have tightened the seat post to make it a virtual solid post. I felt no difference.

    Next week after I go rigid on the forks maybe I will want to allow the seat post to absorb some shock... Don't know yet. If I don't need to loosen it, I may keep my eyes open for an inexpensive replacement post.
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  13. #13
    schlaefer
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    I have had lower back problems and to reduce jaring on my old Trek hardtail mountain bike I bought a thudbuster suspension seatpost. I don't notice it until I ride a bike without one. While it adds weight and reduces efficiency somewaht, if the jarring of road bumps is a significant issue for you, give it a try. http://www.thudbuster.com/index.html

  14. #14
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    Since this was in the LD forum, I assumed you were asking about seat posts for "road bikes".

    I've never used one, but I have noticed a tremendous difference in how saddle construction techniques influence saddle vibration dampening. I'm surprised there hasn't been more attention to advertising certain type of saddle rail applications. They make a big difference.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
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    I prefer to soak up bumps with slightly wider tyres and slightly lower tyre pressures.

  16. #16
    Old enough to know better Spudmeister's Avatar
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    Pun intended?

    Quote Originally Posted by superslomo
    I was just wondering whether anyone is using a shock absorbing seat post, and what the ups and downs might be for them.

    'ups and downs' - I get it

  17. #17
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    Never used them. I'm 6'3" and 188.

  18. #18
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    I used a $50 one a few years back on a MTB i had and i was riding down a trail and went into a huge puddle (i was standing) and the thing just blew apart, it snapped a bolt inside that connects the bottom of the post and the top (with the spring in between).

    It was nice up until then, i wouldn't mind getting another but next time its going to be a good one and not some cheap one.

    edit: i forgot to say that the seat fell into the puddle (figures) but i was about 1/2 of a mile from home so i was ok.
    Last edited by <Slayer>; 08-15-06 at 09:29 PM.

  19. #19
    Not so new
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    I live and ride in NYC and use a Thudbuster ST (short travel) on two of my bikes. They're great at smoothing out the jolts. You can get a little bounce when spinning, but you can also change to a stiffer elastomer to minimize that effect.

    A Thudbuster and Brooks B.17 is lighter than a regular seatpost and sprung Brooks. I have a Brooks Champion Flyer and it works well, too. It's stiffer than the Thudbuster.

  20. #20
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    Suspension post that came on my lower end hybrid is useless.

  21. #21
    Lanterne Rouge
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    Just ended up getting used to the bumps, and I'm currently trying out a Brooks B17N. I have some things coming up in a few weeks, but I've been unable to ride for over a week now, and it has me very concerned... we'll see how it goes, but first have to go get a minor medical issue looked at that has been keeping me sidelined.

  22. #22
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    I have a very very stiff bike ( cannondale aluminium CAAD2 hybrid ) . and I do have a
    suspension seatpost. It works okay. Better than without it.
    I'm considering getting a Thudbuster ST and maybe Specialized
    Expedition Plus ( have springs ) saddle. Would the combination work or negate each other ??

  23. #23
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    I have a hybrid with a shockseatpost and I have a Trek Pilot with one of these
    http://www.koobi.com/index.asp?PageA...WPROD&ProdID=2
    The Koobi is the way to go if the seat fits you. The pilot is smoother than the Cannondale Adventure 600 with both a shock seatpost and front fork. Koobi has a trial period so you have nothing to loose by trying one out. A seatpost with a shock will, as it rides up and down, change the distance to the pedals - I find this less desirable.

  24. #24
    My itch crotches to go! treefire's Avatar
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    I have had three back surgeries, and have purchased and used many, many suspension seat posts. There is only one I recommend. They save energy by you not having to unweight the saddle constantly. I tried once to return to a ridgid post. I made it a block and turned around. Get the White Brothers seatpost. It blows all the others away. Fantastic addition to ride comfort. It is an air post, so you can vary the pressure for your weight. If you put your weight on the rear of the saddle, it acts like a slight lock out due to friction. Move your weight to the center of the saddle and you have Ahhhhh. This feature is good for climbing, when you are on the back of the saddle. My experience with White Brothers customer service has been fantastic.

  25. #25
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWaB
    I prefer to soak up bumps with slightly wider tyres and slightly lower tyre pressures.
    +1

    Carbon fiber is way oversold in the vibration dampening category. And CF seatposts only save a few grams of weight.

    A little less air pressure is far more effective than either.

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