Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 41
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    My Bikes
    Marin Riftzone, Ridley Orion, Jamis Allegro Commuter , Univega road bike
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Century on a Mtn Bike?

    Dumb idea? The summer is ticking by.. I only have my mtn bike (rockhopper hardtail), and have done many rides of 30 and 40+ miles with absolutely no issues. I do that 3 days a week normally. I'd love to be able to do a century before winter creeps up. I'm considering a road bike, but still haven't gotten the cajonies up to cough up the dough, though it's a possibility in the near future.

    I guess I'm just curious.. how many folks have done a century on a mtn bike? Moral support or a smack upside the head, this girl can handle either.
    2007 Ridley Orion Road Bike

    2007 Marin Rift Zone Mountain Bike

    2009 Jamis Allegro Commuter

    Early 80's Univega Viva Sport Road Bike

  2. #2
    Curmudgeon Wil Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nausea, New Hamster
    My Bikes
    (see http://wildavis.smugmug.com/Bikes) Bianchi Veloce (2005), Nishiki Cascade (1992), Schwinn Super Sport (1983)
    Posts
    1,572
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last Saturday I rode 111 miles on my Nishiki Cascade (see pics in sig.) It's not a lightweight by any means (~40 lbs with the bottles & bag), so any long distance ride isn't as quick as one on either of the road bikes. Last Saturday's ride took about 9¾ hours of moving time, with a total of about 11 hours including stops for food/water/photos.

    My MTB is set up for road riding, with slick tyres, and although I have trekking bars to give me more riding positions, I would say that overall, the road bikes are more comfortable for long rides. The trick with long rides is to pace yourself; eat often, drink lots and if you get passed by other riders, resist the temptation to keep up with them. Most of my rides are solo, one of the advantages being that I can set my own pace and not have to drag others or be dragged along myself.

    It sounds like you'll have no problems if you allow enough time - if you're used to doing 30 and 40 miles, then you're a third the way there! Good luck - let us know how you get on!

    - Wil
    "………………………" - Marcel Marceau

  3. #3
    .
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, Oregon
    My Bikes
    2013 Soma ES, 89 Trek 950
    Posts
    3,604
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I bet you could do it. I'm sure you have some slicks on it though right? If not, this will help even more. If you're doing a supported century, then you can not take things on the bike and save on some weight. You'll probably want to slow your pace down a little bit more than what you did on the lower miles. Take it slow and you'll be fine.

  4. #4
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    5,434
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think I've done a full century on my hardtail, but I've done over 80 miles in a day on it. With slick tires, there's no reason not to do it if that's what you have. Since you have plenty of experience riding 40 miles at a time, you shold be able to handle it. You'll be slower than if you had a road bike, but so what? Remember to eat and drink plenty during the ride and save your legs for the second half.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    762
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've done a century along with my then 19 and 20 year old daughters and my husband. We rode one way on a two day ride called TOSRV in Ohio (2 days of 100 miles each). We all had department store mountain bikes, two with shocks and some big butt tires (think 1980's square tire). My husband wore jean shorts and duck taped a 2 liter bottle of water to his top tube. He carried full size wrenches and other tools in a backpack. My kids had only cycled about 10 miles for the year. It was my mother's day present. They are still proud of their achievement. They highlighted the route on a map from Columbus (center of Ohio) to the Kentucky border. It is a lot easier to do an organized century. That ride had rest stops with food and drinks every 25 miles. If you drink and eat and take something like Motrin for butt pain, a century is mostly mental.

  6. #6
    Jet Jockey Banzai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Leavenworth, KS
    My Bikes
    Cannondale CAAD9 SRAM Red, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Nashbar X-frame
    Posts
    4,009
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A century is mostly mental.

    That being said, I wouldn't want to ride one on my MTB...but on the last century I did, I saw a few riders doing this. It can certainly be done.

    While certain bikes and gear are ideal for doing things like that...it's not impossible with "incorrect" gear. How determined are you?
    Good night...and good luck

  7. #7
    Last one to the top... Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    6,798
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I weigh more than 300 pounds, and next week I'll be riding my 3rd metric on a Giant Sedona comfort bike... a mountain leaning comfort bike.

    I run road slicks at 80 PSI, and this time will be my first with a rigid fork and clipless pedals, and my second with bar ends for additional hand positions. I expect it to be even easier.

    I will attempting to ride a century on September 10th... probably on the same bike because I don't have time to finish my road bike and get used to the different positions and components... so, go for it!
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    ANT Club Racer, 2004 Trek 520
    Posts
    1,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One of my female friends did the Chicago to Twin Cities AIDSride on a mountain bike when she was eighteen. Included two back-to-back century days. All she did was swap out her knobbies for slicks and she was good to go.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Severn, MD
    My Bikes
    Airborne Carpe Diem; Trek 520
    Posts
    834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sure -- put some slick tires on, and go for it!!

    One of my MS150 teammates did the ride this year on her old mountain bike (that thing must weigh a ton!) and she did the full ride -- 100 miles on Saturday, 50 on Sunday -- in howling headwinds, no less.

    Beware, though . . . if you do the century and enjoy it, you'll no doubt start lusting even more for a road bike.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    My Bikes
    Marin Riftzone, Ridley Orion, Jamis Allegro Commuter , Univega road bike
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you so much for your replies, it's really appreciated. Nope, still on knobbies, but I'll get slicks. I know I'll be acquiring a road bike within 2 weeks or so, but I wouldn't have the time to get used to it before tackling such a long ride. I would imagine that would be a recipe for one hurting body? I want to do this ride in middle to late September.

    Someone asked how determined I was... I am very determined. Since January, some little mental switch flipped in my head, and I decided to make some lifestyle changes. I bought my bike late last summer, did very little riding, but started riding frequently early this spring once the weather started cooperating a bit. The more I've rode, the more I WANT to ride. I've checked off various goals from Jan until now.. weightloss (goal was to drop 45 lbs, I'm now down and holding at a 53 lb weightloss), different climbs achieved that I would never have thought I could have done.. that sort of thing. I've had a marvelous season, I really have. And so my one last goal for this year, is to do 100 miles. I am not worried about how fast it is done ~ I know on my mtn bike it will be slower than a road bike, but I just need to accomplish this. Gotta do it.
    Last edited by Pugdawg1; 08-11-06 at 08:27 AM.
    2007 Ridley Orion Road Bike

    2007 Marin Rift Zone Mountain Bike

    2009 Jamis Allegro Commuter

    Early 80's Univega Viva Sport Road Bike

  11. #11
    jcm
    jcm is offline
    Gemutlichkeit
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,424
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Absolutely you can. I've done it several times. I agree with the conclusion that a roadie will be easier and faster, but just take your time. My '88 Trek 830 weighs about 44lbs with stuff and water. Sometimes I start out with a gallon or more aboard. I use 1.5" armadillo tires, a Brooks B67 saddle, North Road bars and platform pedals. A 10-3/4 hour ride is a decent pace. Add some stops to re-fuel and it works out to about 11-12 hours.

    Here's the machine:

  12. #12
    Walmart bike rider gpsblake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,619
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rode my century last year on a Walmart Schwinn department store mountain bike. 110 miles. It can be done, just take your time and realize you are going to average a few MPH slower than a road bike.

  13. #13
    tie
    tie is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've never gone a full century, but I have gone more than 90 miles on my mountain bike, knobby tires and all. It is fun passing people on hills when you have a dramatically heavier bike. But being passed going down the hills because you don't have big gears is annoying.

    I've now got a road bike.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    372
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last year I saw a guy on a double century riding a mountain bike, knobbie tires and all. Holy smokes. Using a mountain bike is definitely possible, as long as you are comfortable and like to ride the bike. That is a huge part of it right there.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Auld Blighty
    My Bikes
    Early Cannondale tandem, '99 S&S Frezoni Audax, '65 Moulton Stowaway, '52 Claud Butler, TSR30, Brompton
    Posts
    2,150
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go ahead, you'll be fine. I rode a couple of events in England with a bloke renowned for completing the Elenith (305 km, 4700 m climb) on a BMX (to keep the ride 'interesting').

  16. #16
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,027
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sure you can do a century on a mountain bike. To really impress people do it off-road! I've done a couple of centuries, several metrics (crossing over Rollins Pass(11,666 ft) twice from the east portal of the Moffat Tunnel to the west portal and back) and a whole bucket load of half centuries (Georgia Pass (11,900) to Breckenridge and back). Since these were all in the mountains over rough roads, no slicks need apply. Full knobbies only.

    Road bikes don't beat you up as much...well, paved roads don't beat you up as much either...but it can be done.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    ANT Club Racer, 2004 Trek 520
    Posts
    1,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm doing the Deerfield Retro Randonnee in a couple of weeks. 107 miles on dirt roads with 11,000 feet of climbing.

    I'm doing it on my touring bike because it's the only bike that I have, but lately I've been pining for my old Trek 730 hybrid. That would've been a great bike to bring on this ride.

  18. #18
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Florida
    My Bikes
    Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
    Posts
    15,958
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    My first century was on a rigid MTB with commuter tires (26X1.95's) and flatbars
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  19. #19
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,027
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spokenword
    I'm doing the Deerfield Retro Randonnee in a couple of weeks. 107 miles on dirt roads with 11,000 feet of climbing.

    I'm doing it on my touring bike because it's the only bike that I have, but lately I've been pining for my old Trek 730 hybrid. That would've been a great bike to bring on this ride.
    Okay, fess up! For the climbing they count all of the pebbles in the road right? I mean all the pictures look like the route is rather flat. Route notes: 100 miles flat, last 7 miles climb to 11,000 feet. But wait, Mass. doesn't have anything that goes to 11,000 feet.

    Just kidding! Have fun.

    Me, I'm going to do the Bike with Pike Century in September. Possibly the flattest century you can do in Colorado. Starts at around 4000 ft and goes to around 5000 ft in 100 miles (not a loop). Bad water, flat territory that even people traveling the Santa Fe Trail complained about, starts in the Arkansas Penal Colony and ends in Pueblo...what more could you want?
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  20. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did 3 Chicago-Twin Cities AIDS Rides (500 miles in 6 days), all 3 years on a '96 Specialized Rockhopper. I even had knobbies the first year. It never felt like a problem at all, and I'm sure I was far from the only mtb. One year there was even a guy on an old cruiser type 3 speed. I rode up to him one day and asked him why he was riding a 3 speed and he just shrugged and said it was the only bike he had. Gotta like that attitude! Ride what ya got.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    ANT Club Racer, 2004 Trek 520
    Posts
    1,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by blindsquirrel
    I did 3 Chicago-Twin Cities AIDS Rides (500 miles in 6 days), all 3 years on a '96 Specialized Rockhopper. I even had knobbies the first year. It never felt like a problem at all, and I'm sure I was far from the only mtb. One year there was even a guy on an old cruiser type 3 speed. I rode up to him one day and asked him why he was riding a 3 speed and he just shrugged and said it was the only bike he had. Gotta like that attitude! Ride what ya got.
    my first long ride was a 50 mile route option on an MS150. Rode with a guy who was doing the century route on a Schwinn single speed cruiser. He deflected all of our wonder by telling us how he rode that bike cross country. Was about as close I've ever seen to a cyclist version of a surf bum.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    ANT Club Racer, 2004 Trek 520
    Posts
    1,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    Okay, fess up! For the climbing they count all of the pebbles in the road right? I mean all the pictures look like the route is rather flat. Route notes: 100 miles flat, last 7 miles climb to 11,000 feet. But wait, Mass. doesn't have anything that goes to 11,000 feet.
    you saw the part where they were talking about 20% grades, right?

    If the writeup in the Charles River Wheelmen newsletter was anything to go by, the ride's going to be a monster -- including a 200 yd. 25% climb. Many of the randonneurs that I've talked to is that it's a century that feels like a double just because of all the dirt road climbing involved. Yet, it still sounds utterly gorgeous, so I'm still excited. It might be painful, but I'll just view it as penance for working on the weekend of Boston-Montreal-Boston.
    Me, I'm going to do the Bike with Pike Century in September. Possibly the flattest century you can do in Colorado. Starts at around 4000 ft and goes to around 5000 ft in 100 miles (not a loop). Bad water, flat territory that even people traveling the Santa Fe Trail complained about, starts in the Arkansas Penal Colony and ends in Pueblo...what more could you want?
    Shade would be nice

  23. #23
    Gammal cyklist Reynolds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    My Bikes
    1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaρa pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility
    Posts
    4,143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rode lots of centuries on my all rigid MTB. Slicks help...

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    My Bikes
    Marin Riftzone, Ridley Orion, Jamis Allegro Commuter , Univega road bike
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your replies are inspiring, they really are, and I appreciate it. Next month I will attempt (no, I will conquer LOL), a century, either on my rockhopper or a road bike. I'm wanting to purchase a road bike, but have been waiting.... see the boyfriend is opening a shop, and working on what bikes he'll have in. He's gotten in Marin bikes, Breezer, probably Jamis, and he's trying to get Giant, and it looks like he probably will, and if he does, I'd really like to try a few of those and see. But it's a hurry up and wait thing. Wait for the rep to visit (which he finally did last week), go through the paperwork, jump through a few hoops to make them happy, hurry up and wait again. Hopefully we'll know this week or early next week, and then it'll be another bit of a wait once some bikes are ordered. And so I'm hoping to acquire one soon, but I'm not waiting either. I really need to finish this final goal of mine for this year.
    2007 Ridley Orion Road Bike

    2007 Marin Rift Zone Mountain Bike

    2009 Jamis Allegro Commuter

    Early 80's Univega Viva Sport Road Bike

  25. #25
    cycles per second Gonzo Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    Vitus Aluminum, DiamondBack Apex, Softride Powerwing 700, "Generic" Ishiwata 022, Trek OCLV 110
    Posts
    1,789
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I once rode 110miles on my MTB and hardly any of it on pavement (a lot of gravel and some rail-to-trail and horse trails). My biggest problem with lack of different hand positions. I did a little nerve damage and my hands were numb for a couple of weeks.
    Last edited by Gonzo Bob; 08-16-06 at 06:33 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •