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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 10-13-06, 01:39 PM   #1
danimal123
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Who here uses a rack?

Actually a rack+trunk for 400K+ brevets?

I know we've got a bunch of Carradice users, but a rack+trunk looks cheaper (I have a non-Brooks saddle). Is weight an issue here? I can't imagine an aluminum rack weighing that much.

Anyway, thought I'd ask. Any opinions?
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Old 10-13-06, 03:31 PM   #2
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I've been using a rack on my Marinoni for all my brevets for 5 years now.

I'm also a Carradice user.

My Carradice bag rests on my rack!

However, for shorter rides, I just strap a small bag with a few tools in it onto the rack and go. Works great!



Edit: I added a photo of my Carradice + rack option below. Going with one does not mean you can't use the other. Both together work very well. That photo was taken at the beginning of a 200K brevet last year. This year, I didn't use my Carradice for anything under 400K brevet, instead I used much smaller trunk bags. But that's the beautiful thing about a rack ... you can carry practically nothing at all for relatively short rides ... or go with a larger bag like a Carradice for longer rides.

.
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Old 10-13-06, 03:41 PM   #3
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on the commuter and touring bike, I do. I carry so much stuff on all but club rides. On my race bike, I would never do such. On the race bike, I have a smallish, sleek handlebar bag made by Madden.
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Old 10-13-06, 03:43 PM   #4
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I use a small seat bag for my tire levers, spare tubes and a multitool, and then I use a camping stuffsack and a couple of bungee cords lashed to a rack for extra clothing. The combination of the rack and saddlebag is actually lighter than the larger sized Saddlebags I have seen. I also like that I never have to mess with the seatbag (unless I have a flat or mechanical problem) so I know that I always have a spare and tools with me.
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Old 10-13-06, 04:09 PM   #5
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I have gone with a variety of things, but the rack has always been fitted to the bike for all except two long distance events -- the Giro Tasmania 1000 and the 2005 UMCA 24-Hour Race in Iowa.

My most used method has been to fit a Topeak trunk bag to the rack, which is also a Topeak, with the alloy extrusion to take the bag. I find the bag to be practical for separating out groups of items such as tools, reflective gear, wet-weather clothing, spare clothing and food. On my last century, last weekend, I used just the rack bag without my normal handlebar bag.

For PBP 2003 and I think several other long-distance rides, including this year's Murray and Bacc 1000 in Australia, I used a dry sack made by Sea to Summit and marketed in Australia. This is quite good because of the lighter weight, and it is totally waterproof, but the problem comes in retrieving stuff you might want... which is at the bottom.

For shorter training rides, I will go with a very small StoS dry bag for my tools and tubes, and maybe the handlebar bag.

I also was donated an old Brooks saddlebag that I used on the Giro Tasmania 1000. I have yet to device a really good system to keeping it stable when the rack is not on the bike.

Last edited by Rowan; 10-14-06 at 02:32 PM.
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Old 10-14-06, 01:29 PM   #6
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Don't do rides lasting longer than a day but on the Tandem I use a Seat post mounted rack to carry a top bag. This is to carry the spares parts required for this bike and the bag is large enough to get a couple of tops in and a bit of extra food. Have a couple of different bags and have carried 5Kgs on a rough offride ride so the rack is strong enough. It also saves having to fit a rear mudgaurd.
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Old 10-14-06, 10:28 PM   #7
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I have a Trek Interchange rack and trunk with the fold down panniers. Very handy. Also, a Topeak handlebar bag that doubles as a fanny pack when I ride my Sequoia.
http://i9.tinypic.com/4gitxdh.jpg
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Old 10-15-06, 05:44 AM   #8
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Just completed my club ride. They looked funny at the panniers on my commute bike.SInce most had theri race bikes. However, after it got warm, a couple members asked if I would please place their jackets in my pannier.
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Old 10-15-06, 07:30 AM   #9
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A rack and trunk will be cheaper, but you can carry more in the larger size Carradice saddlebags. I'm a packrat so it's a consideration for me. I also like that I can access the bag while riding (although not as easily as a handlebar bag). I often store an extra water bottle in the side pocket. I can reach that and swap it with an empty bottle in a cage while on the road. Still, the trunk bag and rack is not a bad way to go.
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Old 10-15-06, 01:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclezealot
Just completed my club ride. They looked funny at the panniers on my commute bike.SInce most had theri race bikes. However, after it got warm, a couple members asked if I would please place their jackets in my pannier.
Easy answer- NO. All that weight that you will have to carry for them does add up.

One of the reasons to use a top that packs into its own stuff sack and can then be carried round the waist on its own straps. The only top I have that cannot be stowed like this is my Goretex- and if I am wearing that, then I reckon it will be wet for the ride.
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Old 10-15-06, 03:45 PM   #11
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stapfam. Ah, it was only a couple lite weight nylon style jackets. I hate it when my jersey pockets are all stuffed up. Least I could do for them. They are good cycle mates. Great guides, many time's I'd been lost.
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Old 10-15-06, 10:14 PM   #12
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I don't like the trunk/rack option, either. Almost every trunk bag I've seen has been over-featured and ridiculously heavy for the size, not even counting the rack it sits on. I love the Carradice bags in concept, but the non-Brooks mounting systems can be a bit of a pain. I also had the experience of going to the store with the intention of getting one and arriving with very cold hands- I couldn't get the leather straps open until my hands warmed up.

My favorite medium-size bag that's lighter than a rack and trunk combination is the http://detours.us/catalog/product_in...roducts_id=111 . They make non-ultralight versions and smaller bags that are cheaper, but that's a real winner.

There are some neat front racks out there that go over the wheel and hold a small bag, though I haven't used one myself.

Either those, or you could sew together a bag to hang from your normal seat rails, sort of like a cross between a Carradice and an underseat wedge. This would probably be the cheapest and lightest option of all. If I were making one for myself (which I very well might), I'd probably use velcro straps to attach a large cylindrical bag seat-wedge style, and I'd make the bag with either a big velcroing flap or with a nice zipper (large tabs on all pulling points that I could grab in winter gloves would be necessary). The Carradice zipped roll is a good example- one made out of nylon with velcro straps for quick removal from the bike woutl be amazing.
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Old 10-16-06, 08:54 AM   #13
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I use an Axiom Laurentian trunk bag for brevets and light touring. I don't use a Carradice as I also tend to use my bike for touring and commuting, and have a full rear rack installed for panniers; though I can see the appeal of them if you don't have a rack on your bike. The Axiom is pretty capacious and fits my rain gear, repair tools, spare tubes, reflective strips, spare batteries and reserve food. It also has a shoulder strap and doubles as a decent shoulder bag when off the bike (particularly handy for, say, taking the bike on the train and using the trunk bag as a carry-on)
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Old 10-16-06, 09:02 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka
I've been using a rack on my Marinoni for all my brevets for 5 years now.

I'm also a Carradice user.

My Carradice bag rests on my rack!

However, for shorter rides, I just strap a small bag with a few tools in it onto the rack and go. Works great!



Edit: I added a photo of my Carradice + rack option below. Going with one does not mean you can't use the other. Both together work very well. That photo was taken at the beginning of a 200K brevet last year. This year, I didn't use my Carradice for anything under 400K brevet, instead I used much smaller trunk bags. But that's the beautiful thing about a rack ... you can carry practically nothing at all for relatively short rides ... or go with a larger bag like a Carradice for longer rides.

.


Machka, you and Cadillac look so cold in that picture...brrr...
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