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-   -   Your century bicycle(s) (http://www.bikeforums.net/long-distance-competition-ultracycling-randonneuring-endurance-cycling/270172-your-century-bicycle-s.html)

Machka 02-19-07 01:23 PM

Machak is 49.5 cm (just the right size) and weighs 27 lbs with racks and fenders.


By comparison, my Giants were/are 50 cm, and weigh about 25 lbs ... and the Venture is 57 cm and weighs about 40 lbs. I did my first half dozen or so centuries on that Venture, plus thousands of kilometers of touring, commuting, and other riding ... despite the fact that it is WAY too big for me. I've done around a dozen centuries, and my first 200K brevet, on the Mongoose, which weighs in at 40 lbs as well ... it wasn't bad, just a little slow.

thebulls 02-19-07 04:42 PM

'72 Peugot UO8
'79 Lotus Legend
'01 Novara Gran Fondo (my current randonneuring bike)

sch 02-19-07 05:56 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Unless really really hilly I prefer to use the bent: Rotator Ti Pursuit. It is far more
comfortable and not enough slower to make me want to switch. I do ride a DF
bike on certain group rides. The Cheaha Challenge has cerca 10kft of climbing,
but I skipped about 2500 of this by omitting the central 12miles of the 102 and
doing only 89mi. That is the R side pix. The other pix is from the Leaves of
Lincoln century in south central Tn, very scenic century.

brunop 02-19-07 06:10 PM

http://www.mikebeganyi.com/webimages...rlwat-side.jpg

stripped for nice weather if makes a great all around machine.

http://www.mikebeganyi.com/webimages...ticr-side1.jpg


i always gotta give dap to bmike for his beautiful IF whip as it is my whip's twin! (virtually identical but mine has hammered fenders for a little extra bling and i rock the IF team color decals cuz i'm down with the IF crew. thems my homies as i live about a quarter mile away from the IF world headquarters!) i just don't know how to post pics!! but that ti club racer is ALL DAT for rollin' off some miles (or kilometers for our canadian friends!!!!:) :) :beer: :beer:

Bacciagalupe 02-19-07 09:54 PM

Edited: I used a Xootr Swift on my last century.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u...e/P3030001.jpg

Aluminum frame, bar-ends, SPD pedals, an added water bottle cage. I doubt I'd do another century on it though.

Zonker 02-20-07 01:37 PM

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w...45-1wford1.jpg

No centuries yet, as it is brand new! Waterford RST-22, made to measure. Now, assuming I will have more comfort, am thinking of trying some brevets, as well. A century was all I could take before on my titanium, race oriented bike.

bmike 02-20-07 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zonker
http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w...45-1wford1.jpg

No centuries yet, as it is brand new! Waterford RST-22, made to measure. Now, assuming I will have more comfort, am thinking of trying some brevets, as well. A century was all I could take before on my titanium, race oriented bike.

How tall are you!?

2manybikes 02-20-07 02:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Machka
Machak is 49.5 cm (just the right size) and weighs 27 lbs with racks and fenders.


By comparison, my Giants were/are 50 cm, and weigh about 25 lbs ... and the Venture is 57 cm and weighs about 40 lbs. I did my first half dozen or so centuries on that Venture, plus thousands of kilometers of touring, commuting, and other riding ... despite the fact that it is WAY too big for me. I've done around a dozen centuries, and my first 200K brevet, on the Mongoose, which weighs in at 40 lbs as well ... it wasn't bad, just a little slow.

What type and size tires does Machak Have?
All my bikes that are too big for me give a more comfortable ride.

Zonker 02-20-07 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmike
How tall are you!?

6'3". It does look pretty tall, especially with the 20mm head tube extension. I think the seat tube is 62cm.

brunop 02-20-07 02:49 PM

hey zonk! what happened to the rivendell SS? didn't you have one. duder! i dig the waterford!! nice!!:) :)

Zonker 02-20-07 03:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brunop
hey zonk! what happened to the rivendell SS? didn't you have one. duder! i dig the waterford!! nice!!:) :)

I did indeed have a Rivendell Quickbeam, but sold it...it just wasn't working for a 46 year old with two surgeries on each knee. I did enjoy the Rivendell experience, however...and started thinking about a lugged steel bike with more gears. I considered their Rambouillet (wasn't crazy about the blue, green ones were not expected til mid-year). Then they debuted the A. Homer Hilsen...I'm not too crazy about the name or the decals, but saw they were being made for them by Waterford. So, I went surfing, and then called them. Found I could get a made to measure frame for not much more than the A.H.H. and any color I wanted (British Racing Green). Ended up buying the Nitto bits (seatpost, handlebar, and stem) as well as the tires and cork wrap from Rivendell. Thanks for the kind words!:D

lemurhouse 02-20-07 04:56 PM

I've ridden this frame for 22 years and with several different build configurations. I've got fancier bikes but this is still the one I like best for long rides.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w...702BlueFix.jpg

Cyclaholic 02-20-07 05:28 PM

1 Attachment(s)
A few days ago a couple of friends and I had nothing much to do so on the spur of the moment we decided to go for a quick century. At the end of it I wished I had my lights and another 5 hours free because I was ready for another one.... if I were single and no kids, I would have :D

I know most of you would look at this bike thinking how uncomfortable it must be for long distance. the frame is extremely stiff, its a very agressive riding position, and it has no cargo carrying capacity at all - not even water bottle cages!. Yes true, but as they say, whatever works for you, and this bike with my 100oz hydration pack I find works great for me.:)

bmike 02-20-07 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemurhouse
I've ridden this frame for 22 years and with several different build configurations. I've got fancier bikes but this is still the one I like best for long rides.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w...702BlueFix.jpg

That's classy.
What frame is under there?

Machka 02-20-07 08:37 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by 2manybikes
What type and size tires does Machak Have?
All my bikes that are too big for me give a more comfortable ride.

Machak's tires are 700x25s. I could have gotten the smaller size (650s?) but I opted to go for the full size ones because tires for that size are more common. But the problem with those wheels is that they take up so much room ... I can't use wider tires.

Actually it's the same story for the entire bicycle. Machak is very compact, and everything just fits with no extra room!

Sounds like you need a new bicycle!! :D

.

lemurhouse 02-21-07 08:08 AM

Thanks. Its a Trek 600 from 1985. Its not fancy, but has Reynolds 531 steel and a nice geometry. Too flexy for racing but very comfy and stable. It was starting to develop some some rust so I had it powdercoated a couple of years ago. I removed most of the braze-ons at the same time.

zowie 02-21-07 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zonker
I did indeed have a Rivendell Quickbeam, but sold it...it just wasn't working for a 46 year old with two surgeries on each knee. I did enjoy the Rivendell experience, however...and started thinking about a lugged steel bike with more gears. I considered their Rambouillet (wasn't crazy about the blue, green ones were not expected til mid-year). Then they debuted the A. Homer Hilsen...I'm not too crazy about the name or the decals, but saw they were being made for them by Waterford. So, I went surfing, and then called them. Found I could get a made to measure frame for not much more than the A.H.H. and any color I wanted (British Racing Green). Ended up buying the Nitto bits (seatpost, handlebar, and stem) as well as the tires and cork wrap from Rivendell. Thanks for the kind words!:D

"A. Homer Hilsen" really is a horrendous name for a bike.

Zonker 02-22-07 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zowie
"A. Homer Hilsen" really is a horrendous name for a bike.

They wanted to call it the "Honus Wagner" but could not come to terms with the trademark people that own the copyright. :eek:

fastturtle 02-22-07 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by atomship47
(...)
so how do you know if a particular bike is going to be comfortable on a century if you've never tried it? also, how does relaxed vs. aggressive geometry enter into the picture? some of the bikes pictured appear to be set up for more aggressive riding.

Personnally I am not clear yet how "aggressive" a position I prefer. I have ridden quite a few centuries on bikes where the handlebars were a few cm lower than the saddle, a setup I would qualify as "rather aggressive". I have recently bought a dedicated randonneur bike which is less so, with bars almost level with the saddle. I am not actually sure I prefer this more relaxed position. It could be that because my hands are higher I put more weight on them, it is hard to explain. It could also be that the manufacturer (despite his great reputation and undisputed experience) laid the cables in an inadequate location along the bar, meaning that my hands don't rest on the nice flat surface that is normally provided by Campagnolo levers. One of these days I will probably try redo the cable routing and taping - I hate that - and see if it improves.
One advantage of these highish bars is that I can ride on the drops without feeling too cramped.

dmitri926 02-23-07 12:53 PM

http://photos-058.ak.facebook.com/ip...56058_5831.jpg

mercier aquila from BD 700$. Last summer, ~10 centuries including 3 in a row all the way to canada :D

Dewbert 02-24-07 09:12 AM

1 Attachment(s)
OCR2 and OCRc2 (not at the same time!):)

knobster 02-24-07 10:30 AM

My first century was done on a Trek Pilot 5.0. Very nice riding bike but sold it because I wanted a more durable frame. Another bike I have been riding long distances on is my '93 Trek 520. Very stable and enjoyable ride. Heavy as hell though. I think with the fenders and rack it is like 34 lbs. My newest build is a Eddy Merckx Titanium AX. It's a light one at 17 lbs and doesn't take fenders or racks, but damn it's fast. Very comfortable over the long distances. Will be doing a majority of my centuries on this bike this year.

Question: My Eddy Merckx has a compact double (50/36) with a 13/26 cassette. I haven't ridden it on any long rides yet or over any large hills. Most of the centuries that I've got planned are mountain centuries this year. Does this gearing make sense? I've also got a triple (53/42/28) that I could put on, but because of the bottom bracket the granny can only be used on the large cog on the cassette. I loved the 520 gearing (48/36/22) (12/34), I could climb anything on it.

Eddy Merckx
http://www.tranquilitysystems.com/ga...1/img_0538.jpg

Trek 520
http://www.tranquilitysystems.com/ga...1/IMG_0509.JPG

Trek Pilot 5.0 (regret selling this)
http://www.tranquilitysystems.com/ga...1/IMG_0504.JPG

rule 02-24-07 10:48 AM

http://i17.tinypic.com/454yhqv.jpg 2004 Specialized Roubaix Pro on Shimano R540 wheels...rides like butta. ;)

stapfam 02-24-07 03:35 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Have done imperial centuries on my current three bikes. The Tandem and MTB have been offroad and the Giant SCR and the MTB have been on the road. Can't compare the three bikes as the routes are different but If it was a road ride- then the Giant with no suspension, thin saddle and harsh aluminium frame has been the easiest on the body. Then again- On or Offroad- I would not give up my Thudbuster Suspension post and wide saddle on the Tandem.

stapfam 02-24-07 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by knobster
Question: My Eddy Merckx has a compact double (50/36) with a 13/26 cassette. I haven't ridden it on any long rides yet or over any large hills. Most of the centuries that I've got planned are mountain centuries this year. Does this gearing make sense? I've also got a triple (53/42/28) that I could put on, but because of the bottom bracket the granny can only be used on the large cog on the cassette. I loved the 520 gearing (48/36/22) (12/34), I could climb anything on it.

Depends on you and the mountains but Can you change the rear cassette to something lower? I know of a regular century rider on hilly routes that use a double compact crankset, and he has changed his rear cassette to a 12/34. This did require a long cage rear derailler so adding to the expense but a couple of centuries a month is his norm.

My Giant has a triple and on our hills I would not contemplate any thing else but When I do road rides on the MTB I have a crankset of 44/32/22 and I can assure you that I do use the lowest gear of 22/32 at some point. So why is it that on the same hills on the road bike- I can sail up hills in 30/26? I think it is a mental thing- It starts hurting so change down- but when you run out of gears- you have to put up with the pain.


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