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-   -   Your century bicycle(s) (http://www.bikeforums.net/long-distance-competition-ultracycling-randonneuring-endurance-cycling/270172-your-century-bicycle-s.html)

robertkat 02-15-11 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12225917)
I haven't done a brevet in SD in a few years so I don't know what the demographics are down there anymore but it used to be pretty much dominated by "race" style bikes and a few recumbents. Maybe that's changed?

That still is more or less the case. Although the 200k events seem to bring out many people that just want to check it out, but are not regulars. But then, in SD, I think you see mostly race bikes because that's really all people ride around here. Even to commute. I've yet to do PBP, but I have heard about the differences in equipment amongst nationalities. As a friend of mine put it - the French all have classy steel with front bags, the English all have less classy steel with big saddle bags, and the Italians are all on race bikes. I know that's not entirely true, but that was one impression he came away with from the 3 editions he did.

Homeyba 02-15-11 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robertkat (Post 12232149)
...As a friend of mine put it - the French all have classy steel with front bags, the English all have less classy steel with big saddle bags, and the Italians are all on race bikes. I know that's not entirely true, but that was one impression he came away with from the 3 editions he did.

Yeah, your friend got it right. Speaking in generalities of course. There are always exceptions...btw, I don't know about the English being on even less classy steel, most of them were so dirty it was hard to tell! (I'm over generalizing now ;))

Vireo 02-19-11 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12225917)
Have you done PBP? What I said about it being a regional thing is based on my observations over the years. At a ride like PBP you can almost tell what nationality/region a person is or came from by the type of bicycle they are riding. People from countries (or regions) where the riders have to ride in bad weather often (such as England and NW U.S.) tend to have the more rugged bikes with fenders and lots of baggage capacity. People who are from warmer climates tend to be on the lighter bikes with no fenders and little or no baggage. It tends to be a result of necessity. If you ride in bad weather equipment wears faster, you carry more clothes etc. If you ride in good weather you don't need all that stuff so a carbon race bike becomes more user friendly. Heck, I can spot a group of Italian rides just by their bikes. ;) I haven't done a brevet in SD in a few years so I don't know what the demographics are down there anymore but it used to be pretty much dominated by "race" style bikes and a few recumbents. Maybe that's changed?

I do the San Diego brevets. I have done them on my custom Steel Serotta CSI, on my Colnago C40, Scott CR1, Cervelo Soloist SL and even on my Cervelo P3. I ride whatever I want on the day. We have fair weather in SD and even if it rains I won't wear all that rain clothing. I travel light :lol: Even on 600km I don't take much but what I can put in my jersey pockets. I even did a 600km on my P3 with a Speedfil some gels and flat repair.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5201/...7329db8f_z.jpg

from my last 200km in January (Cervelo Soloist SL with Di2)

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5041/...2889fe92_z.jpg

pictured here with Chris Kostman of AdventureCorps

Six jours 02-19-11 09:20 PM

Vireo's set-up is pretty typical for the SoCal randonneur, in my experience. I think he might even have been one of the guys making fun of my fenders a couple of years back. Hard to remember for sure, though. All those plastic bikes look alike to me. :p

Homeyba 02-19-11 11:50 PM

What's that thing Kostman's on? I bet you a buck it's some 70's thing, or older, with six speed and down tube shifters. Vireo, did you make fun of him having fenders on a SD brevet? I would have. ;) It never rains in SD... actually, the last 300k I did in SD it poured buckets on us the whole ride. Made coming down off of Palomar Mtn. much more fun than usual! ;)

Vireo 02-20-11 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12252102)
What's that thing Kostman's on? I bet you a buck it's some 70's thing, or older, with six speed and down tube shifters. Vireo, did you make fun of him having fenders on a SD brevet? I would have. ;) It never rains in SD... actually, the last 300k I did in SD it poured buckets on us the whole ride. Made coming down off of Palomar Mtn. much more fun than usual! ;)

I don't actually know Kostman is riding. But it's his PBP bike he says. I think he actually prefers 8 speed and bar cons.

What year did you do the rainy 300km in SD? I have done a few rainy 300kms. If you are talking about coming off of Palomar there were a couple of years we went up South Grade down East up Mesa Grande to Santa Ysabel and then up to Julian. In March 2005 I finished "first" and in March 2006 I am in "third" that year from the freezing rain and hail. Those years sucked but then there was 2010 300km also rained like hell. Here and here after mile 90 things get really bad.

Homeyba 02-20-11 12:56 PM

Um, yeah, it was 2005 or 2006. :) I was just cruzing with some friends, rode a fair amount of it with Barkley. We definitely went up the south grade of Palomar and down the East followed, by Mesa Grande and Julian. It was a lot of fun because I got to ride my bicycle on all the roads I cut my motorcycle racing teeth on when I was younger. :)

Vireo 02-20-11 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12253665)
Um, yeah, it was 2005 or 2006. :) I was just cruzing with some friends, rode a fair amount of it with Barkley. We definitely went up the south grade of Palomar and down the East followed, by Mesa Grande and Julian. It was a lot of fun because I got to ride my bicycle on all the roads I cut my motorcycle racing teeth on when I was younger. :)

Wow it is a small world I did both (2005 and 2006) those events! And Barclay that's a name I haven't heard in a while. Last I heard about him is he was speed skating. I remember one time I went out with him in his converted bus to Death Valley for a double century.

electrik 02-20-11 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbycorno (Post 12224007)
I hear ya. My "local" rando crowd (in Portland, almost 200 mi away) is very tolerant of equipment choices. Here in Bend OTOH, if it ain't a racing bike, then what the **** are you doing riding it?? Whatever. Funny thing is, the higher level the riders are the more they appreciate my "antiquated" bike. It's the cat-5 wannabe's that are the worst.

I love humanity - it's the people I can't stand.

SP
Bend, OR

Crabs in a bucket. I get the same thing about equipment choices... "cat 5" types just refuse to believe(self serving) it's about the rider not the equipment. I hear the same words from people who are shocked I've ridden a bicycle to work... "but it must be a special bicycle, no?"

GP 02-20-11 11:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12252102)
What's that thing Kostman's on? I bet you a buck it's some 70's thing, or older, with six speed and down tube shifters. Vireo, did you make fun of him having fenders on a SD brevet? I would have. ;) It never rains in SD... actually, the last 300k I did in SD it poured buckets on us the whole ride. Made coming down off of Palomar Mtn. much more fun than usual! ;)

I think it's a Rivendell.

Homeyba 02-21-11 12:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GP (Post 12255924)
I think it's a Rivendell.

It could be. I'll ask him next time I see him.

GP 02-21-11 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12256015)
It could be. I'll ask him next time I see him.

There's a picture of it on a stand somewhere; either on the xo-1 or Velo Cult website. Plus I did that ride - hours behind Vireo.

lonesomesteve 02-21-11 11:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12225917)
Have you done PBP? What I said about it being a regional thing is based on my observations over the years. At a ride like PBP you can almost tell what nationality/region a person is or came from by the type of bicycle they are riding. People from countries (or regions) where the riders have to ride in bad weather often (such as England and NW U.S.) tend to have the more rugged bikes with fenders and lots of baggage capacity. People who are from warmer climates tend to be on the lighter bikes with no fenders and little or no baggage. It tends to be a result of necessity. If you ride in bad weather equipment wears faster, you carry more clothes etc. If you ride in good weather you don't need all that stuff so a carbon race bike becomes more user friendly. Heck, I can spot a group of Italian rides just by their bikes. ;) I haven't done a brevet in SD in a few years so I don't know what the demographics are down there anymore but it used to be pretty much dominated by "race" style bikes and a few recumbents. Maybe that's changed?

That's an interesting theory about the climate. I always thought it was a function of proximity to Jan Heine. :)

I only started randonneuring in 2008 and it's been exclusively on Seattle Randonneur events, so I don't know much about how the rest of the country and the rest of the world do it. But I was a bit surprised by the bikes I saw on the Cascade 1200 last summer. I was used to seeing the local boys and girls with their steel bikes, aluminum fenders, front bags, and Brooks saddles that show up for all of the local events. But the C1200 draws people from all over the world. The only people there riding lugged steel with level top tubes were us locals. Nearly everyone else was on something racier, lighter and more carbony (carbon-ish?). So it really does seem to be a regional thing. What I don't understand in the least is why anyone cares what someone else is riding.

Homeyba 02-22-11 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lonesomesteve (Post 12261039)
That's an interesting theory about the climate. I always thought it was a function of proximity to Jan Heine. :)...

:roflmao2::roflmao2::roflmao2: You've got a point there!

Quote:

Originally Posted by lonesomesteve (Post 12261039)
...What I don't understand in the least is why anyone cares what someone else is riding.

I don't know if "cares" is the right word. I like to look at other peoples bikes just to see what they are doing because they might be doing something in a way that will work well for me. I've been doing it long enough to have a pretty good idea what will work for me and what won't but not long enough to know everything. A lot of it is just like people watching at the beach. Sometimes I'll see someone on the beach and think to myself "you really shouldn't be wearing that" but then I might see someone wearing a suit that might look pretty good on me. Unfortunately there are too many people out there that think their way is the only way. People are just people.

lonesomesteve 02-22-11 02:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12262639)
:roflmao2::roflmao2::roflmao2: You've got a point there!



I don't know if "cares" is the right word. I like to look at other peoples bikes just to see what they are doing because they might be doing something in a way that will work well for me. I've been doing it long enough to have a pretty good idea what will work for me and what won't but not long enough to know everything. A lot of it is just like people watching at the beach. Sometimes I'll see someone on the beach and think to myself "you really shouldn't be wearing that" but then I might see someone wearing a suit that might look pretty good on me. Unfortunately there are too many people out there that think their way is the only way. People are just people.

Right, "cares" isn't the right word. I'm also very interested in what others are riding because I just love to look at bikes, and like you I think there's a lot to be learned by observing and asking about what others are riding and why. But why, why, why do so many people feel a need to convince others that they're wrong to choose fat/skinny tires or a steel/carbon/titanium/aluminum/bamboo frame or a triple/double/compact crankset?

Sorry, just ranting...

seenloitering 02-22-11 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lonesomesteve (Post 12261039)
What I don't understand in the least is why anyone cares what someone else is riding.

The gaze of others is alienating, but without their judging eyes, we have no identity. Thus we struggle against a terrible yawning gulf, knowing that the very force driving us into isolation drags us also into existence. It's not so much that they care that poses the problem; rather, it's that on the one hand, should we stop seeing them as judging, we would no longer exist, but on the other hand, if we simply allowed their judgement to stand we would become subservient to the hostility of their gaze. We are stuck with a choice between annihilation and alienation, and there is no cure. There is only a crisis of being; a horrific watching eye we cannot bare to turn away.

...or maybe some people are just ********. I'm torn. :P

lonesomesteve 02-23-11 07:01 PM

Ah ha... so that's what you do with a PhD in philosophy. :)

Edit: I think I'm gonna go with the annihilation.

lonesomesteve 02-23-11 07:20 PM

And to take this thread in a less existentialist direction and back toward it's original intent, I'm going to post big fat pictures of my bike because I just remembered I haven't posted this one here yet.

It's a Velo Orange Randonneur. I just put this bike together last fall so I've only done a few rides of 100 miles or more on it so far. I expect it will see some long rides this spring and summer.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4106/...4a862c3a_z.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4127/...00182364_z.jpg

seenloitering 02-23-11 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lonesomesteve (Post 12270534)
Edit: I think I'm gonna go with the annihilation.

A daring choice. I tip my hat to you sir. (nice bike btw)

Six jours 02-23-11 09:30 PM

Very nice. How do you like it so far?

Homeyba 02-23-11 10:32 PM

What????? Fenders in that sunshine????? And, downtuuuube shifters?????? :):) Sorry, had to do my part to head us towards annihilation. ;);)
Nice looking bike! I'm seriously thinking of heading up to Canada to do the RM1200 again next year as long as it doesn't conflict with RAAM. That's not too far from you. Maybe I'll get a chance to see that thing on the road in person????

lonesomesteve 02-24-11 02:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Six jours (Post 12271257)
Very nice. How do you like it so far?

I'm very happy with it. The handling is solid. It takes some input to initiate a turn, but once in a turn it's easy to correct. The ride with 28mm Paselas is like buttah, very cushy. Climbing isn't it's greatest strength, but it feels like a lot of decent quality classic steel bikes when you get out of the saddle and stomp on it. The thing I notice most is how it feels on fast descents. I usually start getting nervous at about 40 mph, but on this bike I've hit 45 a couple times and it felt stable and safe. It's a keeper for sure.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba
What????? Fenders in that sunshine????? And, downtuuuube shifters?????? :):) Sorry, had to do my part to head us towards annihilation. ;);)
Nice looking bike! I'm seriously thinking of heading up to Canada to do the RM1200 again next year as long as it doesn't conflict with RAAM. That's not too far from you. Maybe I'll get a chance to see that thing on the road in person????

The RM1200 is definitely on my short list. If I see you there you'll have to ride slow so I can keep up. The downtube shifters really slow me down, ya know. ;)

BigDaddyPete 02-24-11 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homeyba (Post 12271544)
What????? Fenders in that sunshine????? And, downtuuuube shifters?????? :):) Sorry, had to do my part to head us towards annihilation. ;);)
Nice looking bike! I'm seriously thinking of heading up to Canada to do the RM1200 again next year as long as it doesn't conflict with RAAM. That's not too far from you. Maybe I'll get a chance to see that thing on the road in person????

You say it like it's a bad thing! ;)
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_h...223_115642.jpg

shorthanded 02-24-11 06:44 AM

hee.. i'm pretty fond of the annihilation then. nice bike steve!

i'll posit the completo version having just upped the ante with a new set of cranks-- all that's left is building a set of wheels NOT geared toward farm road riding, and she'll be fully in business.

http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot..._4261623_n.jpg

lonesomesteve 02-24-11 06:13 PM

Well, would you look at that! Suddenly there's a slew of beautiful steel bikes with aluminum fenders, fat-ish tires, big clunky french style handlebar bags, Brooks saddles, no brifters in sight... maybe even some friction shifters!!! Let the annihilation begin...

BigDaddyPete, I already complimented your bike in another thread, but I'll say it again. Beautiful bike!

Shorthanded, I've always been partial to the panel paint jobs on those Masi's. Very classy. And are those the new fancy CNC machined DiaCompe centerpulls I see? If so, what do you think of them? I hate to give the carbon fiber overlords more ammo with which to judge, but I really like centerpull brakes. They have great feel and modulation. I'm thinking of "upgrading" my VO with some old DiaCompe 610s I have on my commuter bike.


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