Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Brusheda
    Guest

    What is your opinion of this?

    I recently saw and ad on here for http://www.LongDistanceCyclingCoach.com. I checked out the site and with a starting price of $10 it is tempting. I am considering doing a 100 mile per day 2 day event in November. I did my first century recently without trouble with a training plan from The Complete Book of Long Distance Cycling. What do you think of hiring this guy?

  2. #2
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,666
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you did a century without trouble, you can do a back-to-back century just fine too. Or is there something more you want to accomplish ... like a particular speed record?


    I wouldn't use it for a century or anything like that. The only way I might use something like that is if I were planning to set some kind of record in a 24-hour race or something.

  3. #3
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    5,434
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think that you can get ample good advice for what you want to do from experienced riders in a local bike club, bikeforum members, and from the book you referenced.

    Note that for $10, all you will be getting is a mileage chart for training. There's much more to riding centuries than just trying to keep up with a mileage chart.

  4. #4
    Spinning like a gerbel spingineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    My Bikes
    Seven
    Posts
    7,946
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    I think that you can get ample good advice for what you want to do from experienced riders in a local bike club, bikeforum members, and from the book you referenced.

    Note that for $10, all you will be getting is a mileage chart for training. There's much more to riding centuries than just trying to keep up with a mileage chart.
    That's good advise. In the end, there is no substitute for actual mileage on the road. You'll want to make sure you have proper mileage. Even if you are able to go out only for 10 or 20 miles during the weekday will help. Just keep up the training every week, and you'll be fine by the time you do your consecutive 100 mile trip.
    I'm in it to finish it.

    My Cycling Blog

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I made my living as a professional coach for many years, primarily for track racers but also for several roadies and a large collegiate road team.

    Coaching for money is B.S., except perhaps in the case of elite and professional racers. Everything you need to know you can learn from experienced riders, and they should be more than happy to talk to you. I'd vote strongly "no" on paying someone to "train" you for century riding.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    BTW, the guy who is apparently running the site is a psychologist with a USAC club (entry) level coaching certificate. This certificate can be obtained by buying a pamphlet from USAC which contains information on the "basics of competitive cycling and introductory information on exercise science, nutrition, sport psychology, bike fit, etc." and then getting a "B" or better on the written test.

    I don't have anything against the guy; he may be a swell fellow and is genuinely trying to be helpful, but I would suggest that if you really feel the need for this kind of coaching, you should simply order the $30 entry level coaching pamphlet from USAC and become your own "expert".

  7. #7
    Spinning like a gerbel spingineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    My Bikes
    Seven
    Posts
    7,946
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Six jours
    BTW, the guy who is apparently running the site is a psychologist with a USAC club (entry) level coaching certificate. This certificate can be obtained by buying a pamphlet from USAC which contains information on the "basics of competitive cycling and introductory information on exercise science, nutrition, sport psychology, bike fit, etc." and then getting a "B" or better on the written test.

    I don't have anything against the guy; he may be a swell fellow and is genuinely trying to be helpful, but I would suggest that if you really feel the need for this kind of coaching, you should simply order the $30 entry level coaching pamphlet from USAC and become your own "expert".
    OMG ... this is just too much. I guess you can't blame someone for trying to make an easy $10.
    I'm in it to finish it.

    My Cycling Blog

  8. #8
    Brusheda
    Guest
    Would it work if I take the double century training plan and instead of doing a long ride on saturday split it between saturday and sunday? If so should I split it evenly, or unevenly with the longer ride on saturday or with the longer ride on sunday?

  9. #9
    Spinning like a gerbel spingineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    My Bikes
    Seven
    Posts
    7,946
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    IMHO, after experiences riding doubles, I would not split it. The body will learn what it takes to do one long endurance ride, as opposed to two shorter ones. I basically trained for doubles by doing a long hard saturday ride, and a recovery on sunday. For example, I would do 80-120, with some climbing (~ 5000 -8000). Then, on sunday, do a flat 50 miler (~3000 ft). But that's what worked for me. For you, it might be a little different. Doing doubles is so psychological anyways.
    I'm in it to finish it.

    My Cycling Blog

  10. #10
    Titanium Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose
    Posts
    153
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd agree, getting all the miles into 1 day is much different than splitting them. Friday I was able to complete my first 100 mile commute day. 40 miles to work, 20 miles at lunch, then 40 miles after work... heading to the hills each time for maybe 4000' of climbing. Weekends are family time, so I have to get my long rides in on the weekdays around work.

    I still feel that ride today, even though I've done those same routes on different days.

    200k 7500' next weekend.... which is just training for a double a month after that. Not sure what kind of riding I'll do this week. Maybe a couple of short commutes 2 days, 40 miles RT.

    SharpT

  11. #11
    Brusheda
    Guest
    But I am training for a two day ride, so don't I need practice doing back to back rides?

  12. #12
    Vintage Punk, w/ Damage Eyeseeu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Front Royal, Virginia
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR Limited, Planet-X Carbon TT, 70's Paris Sport
    Posts
    309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There is some training info for centuries and doubles at http://www.ultracycling.com/training/training.html see if that is any help. It is free.
    How much ya want for that Classic Huffy?!
    I heard Paris Hiltons parents have downgraded her to a Motel 6...

  13. #13
    seattle based cyclist merlinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    My Bikes
    Merlin Extralight, Gios Steel, Schwinn Voyageur fixie
    Posts
    173
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    at the risk of being contrary I'd say there is some value for some folks if you elect the option for weekly email. The reason being - even if "there are no stupid questions" in some forums (surely not this one) if you ask a newbie question you can get zapped and feel pretty stupid. That's why so many people start off in the forums and then either lurk or after a few flameouts leave and never return. With an on-line coach you can ask questions and get answers safely. All the other on-line resources cited above are great. Clearly one doesn't "need" a coach if you are willing to search forums, the websites cited, and ask questions on friendly forums. But I wouldn't dismiss these online coaching resources.
    Andiamo!!

  14. #14
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,666
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Six jours
    BTW, the guy who is apparently running the site is a psychologist with a USAC club (entry) level coaching certificate. This certificate can be obtained by buying a pamphlet from USAC which contains information on the "basics of competitive cycling and introductory information on exercise science, nutrition, sport psychology, bike fit, etc." and then getting a "B" or better on the written test.

    I'm in the process of going for my coaching certification. Hmmmmmm .... maybe I should start charging for the advice I give!

  15. #15
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,666
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brusheda
    But I am training for a two day ride, so don't I need practice doing back to back rides?

    Here ... http://www.machka.net/century.htm

    In the plan I include there, you'd ride long rides on both Saturday and Sunday. My recommendation would be to ride a longer ride on Saturday and a slightly shorter ride on Sunday. For example, suppose you are comfortable doing 50 mile rides right now (incidentally, you don't say where you're currently at here in this thread, but you've got LOTS of time to prepare for an event in November) ... do a 50 mile ride on Saturday, and then go out and do a 40 mile ride on Sunday. Next week, do a 55 mile ride on Saturday, and a 45 mile ride on Sunday.

    If life commitments come up on a Saturday a few weeks from now and you can only get in a 35 mile ride, then do a 55 mile ride on Sunday. It doesn't hurt to switch it around now and then. And if something comes up that takes the whole day (or if you get a 24-hour torrential downpour or something), then just do a long ride on the other day of the weekend. You can also pick a distance every few weeks and do the same distance on both days. Say you're at the point where one weekend you do 60 miles on Saturday and 50 miles on Sunday ... maybe the next weekend do 60 and 60. Then you might want to back off the next weekend and do 40 on Saturday and 35 on Sunday ... just to rest a bit ... and then back up to the 50-60 mile level again the following week.

    There is no one set way of training for a century or back-to-back centuries or double centuries or longer distances. We're all different with different fitness levels and different commitments etc. Centuries and back-to-back centuries are really not that difficult and you've got lots of time to prepare, so you've got the flexibility to mix it up. Just keep gradually increasing the distances you do ... and don't forget to back off a bit about every 4 weeks or so to get some rest and not burn out.

    Now one suggestion I would make is this ... about the time where you're comfortable doing back-to-back 60 mile rides, start increasing the distance on only one day. In other words, on Saturday do 65 miles, while Sunday remains at 50-60 miles ... a few weeks later you'll be doing an 80 mile ride on Saturday, but still a 50-60 mile ride on Sunday ... and then a few weeks later you'll do a century on Saturday, and maybe take Sunday off or do a light spin on Sunday. Back off the miles the next weekend to rest, and then start increasing the miles again. I would suggest getting in several centuries (not back-to-back ones) before November. After you've done about 3 centuries you'll start feeling comfortable with that distance - you'll know what to eat and how often, you'll have an idea what kind of breaks you need to take, you'll have a pretty good idea if your bicycle is set up correctly, etc. And if you can do a century on one day, and a ride of 60-75 miles on the next day, you can do back-to-back centuries.


    BTW - what's the event?

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,941
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brusheda
    I recently saw and ad on here for http://www.LongDistanceCyclingCoach.com. I checked out the site and with a starting price of $10 it is tempting. I am considering doing a 100 mile per day 2 day event in November. I did my first century recently without trouble with a training plan from The Complete Book of Long Distance Cycling. What do you think of hiring this guy?
    I did the Carmichael online training last year - you can find my conclusions here...

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ericgu/archive...05/657053.aspx
    Eric

    2005 Trek 5.2 Madone, Red with Yellow Flames (Beauty)
    199x Lemond Tourmalet, Yellow with fenders (Beast)

    Read my cycling blog at http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx
    Like climbing? Goto http://www.bicycleclimbs.com

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,941
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brusheda
    But I am training for a two day ride, so don't I need practice doing back to back rides?
    I've done two-days without any long back-to-back rides, and I don't think I had any issues because of it.

    So, you don't have to. It is interesting to do some riding the second day to understand that a) your legs are going to hurt for a while (perhaps up to 30 minutes) and b) your legs will loosen up at some point.

    I think it's much more about the quality of training rather than the amount of training.
    Eric

    2005 Trek 5.2 Madone, Red with Yellow Flames (Beauty)
    199x Lemond Tourmalet, Yellow with fenders (Beast)

    Read my cycling blog at http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx
    Like climbing? Goto http://www.bicycleclimbs.com

  18. #18
    ...
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey guys. Someone sent me an e-mail about this thread, so I should clear up a few things.

    Is a coach worth the money? I cover that here. Keep in mind that I focus on beginners. Sure they can learn through books and the internet, but that takes time. Meanwhile, a coach can help take some of the error out of trial and error.

    Don't get the wrong idea about the programs that are offered. First, keep in mind that all of the programs are custom made to fit your background and schedule. I doubt you can find that for free anywhere. Second, understand that a simple mileage chart is not the only option that is offered, it's simply the least expensive. I offer programs with specific workouts and programs with specific HR zones. I'll be certified in power by the end of the year, so I will be offering power-based programs soon. Obviously these are better than a mileage only chart. The reason I offer the mileage only chart is simple- there is a big demand for it. Finally, I offer add-ons such as a flexible chart and e-mails with the coach. Basically, you decide how much coaching you want, nothing more and nothing less.

    Enjoy the ride!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •