Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-10-07, 07:08 PM   #1
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Tourer or road bike

I have a Jamis Coda Elite, it came with flat bars and I changed them out to trekking bars. The bike is steel, with carbon forks. I'm almost 67 years old, but I would like to try distance riding. The farthest I've gone with the bike is 67 miles, for a birthday ride. I have the trekking bars on a heads up riser and they end up about 1" above my saddle. I have Rheumatoid arthritis, but I have it under control, for the most part. My question is should I go with a Trek 520 or a Cannondale T800 or some other road bike, like the Trek Pilot. I've been riding a year and I have 3340 miles in. I think I could have about 5000 miles in, but we had some medical problems to take care of. We're not completely out of the woods yet, but close I hope. Or should I just wait for a while, to get more miles under my belt. One of the main things I'm worried about is the drop bars. I don't want to buy a road bike and end up not being able to use it, as much as I would like to. That one of the reasons I bought the Jamis with the flatbars. I really like the trekking bars, but a bike mechanic told me, with the riser I have on it, I'll wear the headset out on it faster or it may fail. So if I buy a bike with drop bars and use a riser on them and keep taking spacers out as I get use to it, would that work? I really appreciate any replys, thanks, George
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-07, 07:52 PM   #2
Hezz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,649
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would keep your Coda elite and set it up for long distance riding and buy another road bike for shorter faster rides. A carbon fiber frame meant for an easy ride would be a good choice. If that's too expensive a good old quality crome moly frame outfitted with newer components will make a good riding bike. Also, if you can find an old good quality steel frame bike with a frame that is slightly too tall by todays standards you can keep the seat lower in relation to the handlebars without having to put on too tall of a stem. More variation is fun. Just my two cents. It's also nice to have a backup bike if one gets damaged, stolen or otherwise out of commission.

You don't really need a touring bike for long distance unless you plan on carrying panniers or loads over 15 pounds.

Last edited by Hezz; 07-10-07 at 07:58 PM.
Hezz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 05:16 AM   #3
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Richard Cranium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Deep in the Shawnee Forest
Bikes: LeMond - Gunnar
Posts: 2,830
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
So if I buy a bike with drop bars and use a riser on them and keep taking spacers out as I get use to it, would that work? I really appreciate any replys, thanks, George
Sounds like a plan. My experience suggests that the tire-size used, along with tire pressure, are the greatest factors in relation to ride comfort. You may want to review all the bicycles you are interested in with an eye to the types of tires they can be fitted with. Have you experimented with using "road tires" on your current bike?
Richard Cranium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 05:49 AM   #4
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I did have 28s on the Coda, but went to 32s for comfort.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 06:11 AM   #5
stormchaser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I might would recommend trying some different bars before considering a new bike. I am looking at some dirt drops, which have the ends of the drops flared out at an angle. What shifters do you have? Is the lack of different hand positions the factor limiting your distance? Absolutly +1 on the tire clearance.

Last edited by stormchaser; 07-11-07 at 06:18 AM.
stormchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 06:26 AM   #6
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
The trekking bars give me plenty of hand positions and I thought with the bigger tires, and having more comfort, they would help me go farther. The more I think about it, I guess I should work on the engine, thanks for the replys though.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 10:50 AM   #7
Six jours
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think you've correctly answered your own question. I think the bike is well suited to your goals, and I don't think there would be any advantage to replacing it or installing drop bars. IMO, the only advantage to drop bars, for most of us, comes from having several different hand positions. The trekking bars offer this advantage as well, so unless you also want the option of being able to put your hands in the drops to lean further over (doesn't sound like that's your thing) the trekking bars should be fine.

In your shoes, I'd save my money for something useful, like liquor or internet pornography.

HTH!
Six jours is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 02:06 PM   #8
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Six jours
I think you've correctly answered your own question. I think the bike is well suited to your goals, and I don't think there would be any advantage to replacing it or installing drop bars. IMO, the only advantage to drop bars, for most of us, comes from having several different hand positions. The trekking bars offer this advantage as well, so unless you also want the option of being able to put your hands in the drops to lean further over (doesn't sound like that's your thing) the trekking bars should be fine.

In your shoes, I'd save my money for something useful, like liquor or internet pornography.

HTH!


Thank's, I really needed that, I've been on the computer trying to figure out what bike would meet my goals and the more I looked and searched, I kept coming back to the one I have. I looked at so many different geometry on different bikes my eyes are crossed. I know, I do have to work on the engine and I am. Do you think that riser is going to give me trouble down the road. I'm thinking not, or they would be out of business. Thanks again for all the replys.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 02:16 PM   #9
Six jours
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I've been on the computer trying to figure out what bike would meet my goals and the more I looked and searched, I kept coming back to the one I have.
Judging by the pictures of the model you're riding, along with what you've written here, I think I'd have come to the same conclusion.

As for the rest, I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "heads up riser". If you've simply got a bunch of spacers under the stem, that shouldn't pose any problem. If it's something else, I'm afraid I'd need to know more about it before giving an opinion.

HTH!
Six jours is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 02:57 PM   #10
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Six jours
Judging by the pictures of the model you're riding, along with what you've written here, I think I'd have come to the same conclusion.

As for the rest, I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "heads up riser". If you've simply got a bunch of spacers under the stem, that shouldn't pose any problem. If it's something else, I'm afraid I'd need to know more about it before giving an opinion.

HTH!

Yes that what it is 4 spacers and I hope to start taking some out. I can get low enough now, but my neck gives me a little problem.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 03:02 PM   #11
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Bikes:
Posts: 8,413
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 667 Post(s)
I have always been a big guy and I beat a really good Mtn bike to death.
The headset was fine. In fact, the headset is one of the few components I have never seen fail on my bikes.

BUT... if you are worried about it, kill the problem dead... Get a Chris King headset.
That sucker will prob still work for your great grandkid's cross country trip 60 years from now
late is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 03:09 PM   #12
George
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by late
I have always been a big guy and I beat a really good Mtn bike to death.
The headset was fine. In fact, the headset is one of the few components I have never seen fail.

BUT... if you are worried about it, kill the problem dead... Get a Chris King headset.
That sucker will prob still work for your great grandkid's cross country trip 60 years from now

Thanks Late, would you believe, I had to replace the headset already. It was endexing and I thought maybe the riser may have caused that. From the 3340= miles in a year, only 1500 were on the Jamis. I had a MTB mountian bike headset put in. I'm going to put the next one in myself now that I know what it's all about. Thanks for the tip though, I'll make a note of it.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-07, 03:31 PM   #13
Six jours
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Yes that what it is 4 spacers and I hope to start taking some out. I can get low enough now, but my neck gives me a little problem.
IMO the bike shop guy was in error. The spacers do put a bit more stress on the upper bearings, and if it was the upper cup that was pitted, then the spacers may indeed be a problem.

But I have never in my life seen upper bearings that were damaged, except through lousy installation, gross neglect and/or extreme age, and in almost all of those circumstances, the lower bearings were in much worse condition than the upper. The lower bearings are the ones that are getting pounded, and again in my experience, they are always the ones to fail first.

IMO, pitting at 1500 miles almost certainly indicates damage from poor installation. Some 17 year old overtightened your headset when he put it in; I'd put money on it.
Six jours is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:23 AM.