Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    BMC Lover
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Double Century - pitfalls to avoid

    Most I've ever ridden in a single setting is 125 miles...just finished a major cycling goal of mine (cycling up Mt Evans in CO), so it's on to the next goal: Double Century, preferably done in under 12 1/2 hrs.

    Starting the research (this is my first visit into the Long Distance forum!), but as I do, I was curious of any typical "Big Mistakes" to avoid that you all have experienced.

    I've read up on the "5 training Mistakes" on UltraCycling.com...but am interested to hear anyone's experience and what they would aboslutely avoid.

  2. #2
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    My Bikes
    Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid
    Posts
    10,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FixdGearHead View Post
    I've read up on the "5 training Mistakes" on UltraCycling.com...but am interested to hear anyone's experience and what they would aboslutely avoid.
    Setting a time goal on a ride that's much different than anything you've attempted before

    Seriously, there's a much bigger difference between 125 and 200 miles than there is between 50 and 100 miles. Set a time goal for something you haven't figured out yet, and you may ride too hard.

  3. #3
    BMC Lover
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
    Setting a time goal on a ride that's much different than anything you've attempted before

    Seriously, there's a much bigger difference between 125 and 200 miles than there is between 50 and 100 miles. Set a time goal for something you haven't figured out yet, and you may ride too hard.
    Alrighty; point taken

  4. #4
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    5,434
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
    Setting a time goal on a ride that's much different than anything you've attempted before

    Seriously, there's a much bigger difference between 125 and 200 miles than there is between 50 and 100 miles. Set a time goal for something you haven't figured out yet, and you may ride too hard.
    +10.

    Biggest pitfalls:

    1. Riding too hard in the first half. If you DNF, it doesn't matter what your average speed was.

    2. Not eating enough food. 200 miles is prime bonk country.

    3. Not staying hydrated. Know what the weather is going to be and how far apart the available services are and plan accordingly - especially in the afternoon when it's hottest. If you end up rationing water, you are in trouble.

    4. Fit/comfort issues. If your butt or hands hurt after the first 100 miles, it's not going to get any better in the second 100.

  5. #5
    seattle based cyclist merlinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    My Bikes
    Merlin Extralight, Gios Steel, Schwinn Voyageur fixie
    Posts
    173
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    not getting enough electrolytes
    Andiamo!!

  6. #6
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,033
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I've often read that many centruy riders eat something solid at mile 65-70. I have done so on many of my centuries and actually feel strong at mile 95, strong enough for a sprint finish. That's a turkey sandwich or similar.

    Is there a point after the first hundred where many double riders might stop for another feed type break? 120 miles?150? Or just whenever you feel the need?

  7. #7
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,666
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    I've often read that many centruy riders eat something solid at mile 65-70. I have done so on many of my centuries and actually feel strong at mile 95, strong enough for a sprint finish. That's a turkey sandwich or similar.

    Is there a point after the first hundred where many double riders might stop for another feed type break? 120 miles?150? Or just whenever you feel the need?

    On a century, I like to eat something solid (like a sandwich) somewhere around the halfway point. On longer rides, I like to eat something solid approximately every 5 hours.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    ANT Club Racer, 2004 Trek 520
    Posts
    1,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    I've often read that many centruy riders eat something solid at mile 65-70. I have done so on many of my centuries and actually feel strong at mile 95, strong enough for a sprint finish. That's a turkey sandwich or similar.

    Is there a point after the first hundred where many double riders might stop for another feed type break? 120 miles?150? Or just whenever you feel the need?
    I'll eat something solid when it's time for lunch or dinner. I don't tend to associate it with the number of miles under my legs, but that usually works out to something like 120 miles into a 250 mile ride.

    My strongest 400k finish came after I had a nice, hearty bowl of chili about 60 miles before the finish. The last 50 miles felt like a whole new ride.

  9. #9
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,666
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spokenword View Post
    I'll eat something solid when it's time for lunch or dinner.
    That reminds me ...... It struck me as amusing (in a way) that the Gold Rush Randonnee volunteers were under the impression that we cyclists wanted breakfast foods early in the morning, and lunch foods around noon, and supper foods early in the evening, and light snacks during the night ... and they didn't have much of anything ready for us when they decided that breakfast was over and it wasn't quite time for lunch, or when lunch was over and it wasn't quite time for supper!!! They obviously had NO idea that we'll eat a wide variety of foods at ANY time of the day. A big bowl of pasta works for me at 2 am, at 8 am, at 2 pm, at 8 pm, or anywhere in between ..... whenever I'm hungry.

    So I guess one pitfall to avoid for any ride that extends over several mealtimes would be ... don't eat what you think you SHOULD eat based on time of day ... eat what you WANT to eat, no matter what time of day it is.

  10. #10
    www.ocrebels.com Rick@OCRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    GT Edge Titanium, Mercian Vincitore, Masi Gran Criterium, GT Zaskar, Hercules 3-Speed
    Posts
    5,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Beanz,
    Good to see you on the Long Distance Forum! Yes, you will look good in that Triple Crown jersey and even better in that Thousand Mile Club Triple Crown jersey . . .
    I know you can do it!

    Rick / OCRR (who has been trying to get Beanz to ride a double for three years now . . . )
    Last edited by Rick@OCRR; 07-27-07 at 06:37 PM.

  11. #11
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,033
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick@OCRR View Post
    Hi Beanz,
    Good to see you on the Long Distance Forum! Yes, you will look good in that Triple Crown jersey and even bette in that Thousand Mile Club Triple Crown jersey . . .
    I know you can do it!

    Rick / OCRR (who has been trying to get Beanz to ride a double for three years now . . . )

    Yup, it's time Rick. I'm getting the itch! Been riding 10 years consistently. I guess the desire aint gonna go away, so I better get the TC before I hit 50 and get too old!

    I figure I'll go for the King of the Mtns too while I'm in shape, When I get in shape!

    I will need some advice though. I took look at the TC rules and register stuff a while back. Looked confusing as I know nothing about organized rides. All I know is 'bring your bike'!

  12. #12
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,033
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spokenword View Post

    My strongest 400k finish came after I had a nice, hearty bowl of chili about 60 miles before the finish. The last 50 miles felt like a whole new ride.
    Honestly, I don't think that would work for me. Well, it may motivate me to reach the finish sooner than planned!

  13. #13
    www.ocrebels.com Rick@OCRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    GT Edge Titanium, Mercian Vincitore, Masi Gran Criterium, GT Zaskar, Hercules 3-Speed
    Posts
    5,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No problem Beanz,
    As you know, I'm happy to help! I've been doing this Triple Crown thing since Jackie first talked me into it just before Davis 2003. Been at it ever since, but really, I'm a newbee compared to a lot of these riders. I think there are five or six riders with over 100 CA doubles now.

    Still, its a great community and the more riders you get to know, the better!

    Soon you can have a page like this with all your stats!

    http://www.caltriplecrown.org/Double...sp?RiderID=729

    Rick / OCRR
    Last edited by Rick@OCRR; 07-27-07 at 08:59 PM.

  14. #14
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,033
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Wow Rick, you are a crazy one! Mine will say, He did this one, this one, and this one, now he is done with it!

  15. #15
    www.ocrebels.com Rick@OCRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    GT Edge Titanium, Mercian Vincitore, Masi Gran Criterium, GT Zaskar, Hercules 3-Speed
    Posts
    5,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I know Beanz,

    You say that now, but you have not ridden your double first yet, so you have no idea the sense of adventure you get from it. Once you experience that . . . it's a whole different world!

    You'll see . . .

    Rick / OCRR

  16. #16
    Senior Member DanteB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Bakersfield, Host of the 2012 ToC ITT
    My Bikes
    Waterford 2200
    Posts
    1,747
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For me,
    1. Not going out to hard the first 100, you've got to pace yourself. As you do more doubles you will learn what that pace is.
    2. Keeping yourself hydrated. I try to drink 1 large bottle of water per hour, more if it is hot.
    3. Nutrition, I found that I can't eat much over 350 calories per hour. If I eat more than that I start to bloat then I tend not to eat and drink, the worst thing you can do.
    4. Getting comfortable on your bike. You need to do this so you can keep your mind in the game.
    5. Plan for all contingencies, don't let things that happen on the road bother you and ruin your ride.
    Make mine a double!

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,941
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bike fit, comfort are big deals, but to some extent you can ignore problems there if they're minor.

    Errors in nutrition and hydration are what will kill you. You can do 2 hours with crappy nutrition, to do a strong century you need good nutrition, but any mistakes will kill you.

    Too much food/too little food/wrong food can kill you. But lack of electrolytes - especially salt will sink you quickest of all.
    Eric

    2005 Trek 5.2 Madone, Red with Yellow Flames (Beauty)
    199x Lemond Tourmalet, Yellow with fenders (Beast)

    Read my cycling blog at http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx
    Like climbing? Goto http://www.bicycleclimbs.com

  18. #18
    vegan cyclist
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    between the cascades and puget sound
    My Bikes
    90's carbon fiber miyata, 05 zoo pitbill trialsbike
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been road biking for about 7 months now, and just recently finnished my first double in 11hrs45min . I was able to make the entire distance without a food stop. I caried two waterbottles, a 6hr perpetuem bottle, and an additional 6hr supply of perpetuem in a ziploc (diddn't even need a saddlebag). Perpeuem kept me happy the whole ride. Finnishing, I felt strong, strong enough to sprint up a steep hill 2 miles from the finnish, fast enough to inspre a literal pat on the back once the guy I was pacing with caught up. Felt like I had plenty more miles left in my legs.

    pitfall:
    I found my bar was set up too low/foreward, and I was forced to ride with the very end of my palms on it. I'm not sure how much this contributed to aerodynamics, but I could coast past people who where pedaling down hills. Could just be my tires though.
    http://myspace.com/thedevilmakesthree

    "There is no such thing as bad weather, people are just soft"

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    181
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Two little gems get me through the doubles...

    "A double century doesn't necessarily hurt WORSE than a century, it just hurts LONGER"

    and the best advice in the cycling world - 'most every ride is going to have a bad time. Maybe it's nutrition, maybe it's lack-of-sleep the night before, maybe it's hills and headwind. Take a few minutes, get something to eat, breathe deeply and do it some more. When you're 20 miles down the road, the low will go away and will be replaced with the highest of highs!!!!

  20. #20
    www.ocrebels.com Rick@OCRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    GT Edge Titanium, Mercian Vincitore, Masi Gran Criterium, GT Zaskar, Hercules 3-Speed
    Posts
    5,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Wow Rick, you are a crazy one! Mine will say, He did this one, this one, and this one, now he is done with it!
    Okay Beanz,
    Here's a pitfall to avoid: Following other riders and thinking that they are on the correct course.

    Yes, usually they are. But be sure to read your route sheet carefully and know where you are at all times. I've added a few "bonus miles" to doubles by following riders who thought they knew where they were going.

    Rick / OCRR

  21. #21
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    My Bikes
    Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid
    Posts
    10,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick@OCRR View Post
    Yes, usually they are. But be sure to read your route sheet carefully and know where you are at all times. I've added a few "bonus miles" to doubles by following riders who thought they knew where they were going.
    You may have been following me. Without any exaggeration, I can say that if I'm doing an organized century or greater, at least 90% of the time, I somehow get off the course and add a few miles. I even succeeded in doing this the first time I rode the STP -- an impressive feat when you consider that you have about 8,000 riders going in a straight line.

  22. #22
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,033
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    My gosh Rick, that would be the last thing I'd want on a double. If I'm ever in Oregon, remind me not to follow "Fred"!

  23. #23
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Deep in the Shawnee Forest
    My Bikes
    LeMond - Gunnar
    Posts
    2,786
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One of the "biggest" pitfalls, is probably simply choosing to ride with other riders that are going faster or slower than your pace. Often, double century rides become or seem much more difficult than they need to be. This usually happens when the cyclist starts a ride without a healthy respect for the type of conditions (weather) or type of route (hills) that the rider is going to endure.

    Simply put, I figure the biggest pitfalls to completing and enjoying a double - is starting out too fast for yourself, the weather or the route......... Make a mistake about anyone of these items and it's no fun.......

  24. #24
    www.ocrebels.com Rick@OCRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    GT Edge Titanium, Mercian Vincitore, Masi Gran Criterium, GT Zaskar, Hercules 3-Speed
    Posts
    5,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow Beanz,

    Here is a guy who knows what he's talking about!

    Back in my first life of riding doubles, I actually rode a double (or two) with Richard Cranium (not his real name!) when I lived in the St.Louis area ('80 - '95). Actually, I would just draft except for very short breaks when I would take the front.

    Richard Cranium (not his real name) and I rode the first century of the CDC (Central Double Century, Litchfield, IL) in 4:21 (it was a very flat course!) and I finished the double in under 12:00!

    I've been trying to talk Richard Cranium (not his real name) into coming out to ride the Grand Tour with us, as has Bob Harting (who used to organize the CDC in Litchfield, now lives in San Diego), but so far no success. Will keep trying!

    Rick / OCRR

  25. #25
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    My Bikes
    Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid
    Posts
    10,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
    One of the "biggest" pitfalls, is probably simply choosing to ride with other riders that are going faster or slower than your pace.
    This is huge. Going even 0.2 mph too fast can really put you in a world of hurt after you've been out all day. I also think that going too slow is not a good idea, particularly if there is a lot of climbing. If the ride is challenging enough that you have any doubts about your ability to finish, just go at your own pace and let others ride at theirs. If you want to stay together, the faster people can take longer breaks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    My gosh Rick, that would be the last thing I'd want on a double. If I'm ever in Oregon, remind me not to follow "Fred"!
    My buddies have wanted to shoot me on more than one occasion. Partly for bad navigation, but partly because I always want the "full treatment" -- i.e. if there's an easy way and a hard way to do something, I hate taking the easy way.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •