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  1. #1
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    Tuscany replacement?

    A few years ago while considering a light weight LD bike I was impressed by the Litespeed Tuscany. Now that I'm ready to buy one I find that Litespeed no longer offers it. Bummer! The Tuscany seemed to most closly match what I'm looking for, light weight non racerboy LD comfort to share riding duty with a heavy weight Trek 520 already in the stable. It also seemed a great fit for my long torso body geometry, something the 520 also excells at.

    What bike in Litespeeds's line up, if any, would be best for LD riding? What other Ti bikes would be comparable, if any?
    I'm just trying to be the person my dog thinks I am.

  2. #2
    Who is Austin Dunbar?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom cotter View Post
    A few years ago while considering a light weight LD bike I was impressed by the Litespeed Tuscany. Now that I'm ready to buy one I find that Litespeed no longer offers it. Bummer! The Tuscany seemed to most closly match what I'm looking for, light weight non racerboy LD comfort to share riding duty with a heavy weight Trek 520 already in the stable. It also seemed a great fit for my long torso body geometry, something the 520 also excells at.

    What bike in Litespeeds's line up, if any, would be best for LD riding? What other Ti bikes would be comparable, if any?
    The Litespeed Siena is virtually the same tube set as the Tuscany. It just uses compact geometry. In 2006, the last year they made the Tuscany, they sold both frames for the same price and were marketed as the same tubes with different top tube geometry. The head and seat tube angles are the exact same so it is really a matter of style more than function. In 07 they dropped most of their traditional geometry frames (Ultimate, Tuscany, etc.) and went almost exclusively compact. I would have no problems riding a Siena if something happened to my Tuscany.
    And I wanna play a little game I like to call "Block My Spike" with Misty May. - House

  3. #3
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    ti club racer from independent fabrication...

  4. #4
    Not an internet law-maker Godwin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pb_Okole View Post
    The Litespeed Siena is virtually the same tube set as the Tuscany. It just uses compact geometry. In 2006, the last year they made the Tuscany, they sold both frames for the same price and were marketed as the same tubes with different top tube geometry. The head and seat tube angles are the exact same so it is really a matter of style more than function. In 07 they dropped most of their traditional geometry frames (Ultimate, Tuscany, etc.) and went almost exclusively compact. I would have no problems riding a Siena if something happened to my Tuscany.
    I ride a Sienna (2006) and (other than muscle soreness) have never really felt sore from riding (okay, once but it was after riding for pretty much more than a day straight through and after days of riding before). You should also be able to find older models like the Tuscany for fairly good prices on eBay or elsewhere, Ti frames pretty much last forever.

    Crit bikes are made to be comfortable (and fast) for long distances because races are commonly 100 miles or more. You'd run into trouble if you were looking at a TT or Tri bike which are pretty much built for speed only.

    Opinions seem to be divided whether a sloping top tube makes a bike slightly more or less comfortable although most seem to say it makes no impact at all.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
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    "Crit bikes are made to be comfortable (and fast) for long distances because races are commonly 100 miles or more. "?????

    Um, no.... crit bikes are most definitely NOT made to be comfortable for long distances. A specialty crit bike (which is, I might add, an extremely rare bird) is essentially a track sprint bike with gears: built for rigidity and quick handling - screw comfort. Quite unlike a road bike in character. And another thing: pro/elite level criteriums typically run an hour plus 5 laps. More like 30 miles than 100.

    Scott Peterson
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    Home of the Cascade Cycling Classic - one of North America's longest running pro stage races.

  6. #6
    Ho-Jahm Hocam's Avatar
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    He must mean bikes with stage race geometry.

    Litespeed seems really nice but I can't really tell the difference between most of their models, is it mainly weight and cost? The descriptions are oddly vague and plain but detailed on unimportant things.
    Race-o-meter:
    Broken until next season

  7. #7
    Not an internet law-maker Godwin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbycorno View Post
    "Crit bikes are made to be comfortable (and fast) for long distances because races are commonly 100 miles or more. "?????

    Um, no.... crit bikes are most definitely NOT made to be comfortable for long distances. A specialty crit bike (which is, I might add, an extremely rare bird) is essentially a track sprint bike with gears: built for rigidity and quick handling - screw comfort. Quite unlike a road bike in character. And another thing: pro/elite level criteriums typically run an hour plus 5 laps. More like 30 miles than 100.

    Scott Peterson
    Bend, OR
    Home of the Cascade Cycling Classic - one of North America's longest running pro stage races.
    Oh poop. Not actually a racer, got the terms messed up, sorry.

  8. #8
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godwin View Post

    Crit bikes are made to be comfortable (and fast) for long distances because races are commonly 100 miles or more. You'd run into trouble if you were looking at a TT or Tri bike which are pretty much built for speed only.
    someone already commented on crit geometry... but a tri bike (ironman distance) could be OK for LD - provided the rider was fit properly. (think RAAM).

  9. #9
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    someone already commented on crit geometry... but a tri bike (ironman distance) could be OK for LD - provided the rider was fit properly. (think RAAM).
    Indeed. Several folks have completed 200-400km brevets on tri bikes in these parts, and appeared none the worse for it, tho' you wouldn't catch me doing that...

    Scott P
    Bend, OR

  10. #10
    The guy in the 50+ jersey PAlt's Avatar
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    What size frame? Have a Tuscany (1999 pre Lynskey sellout) that could be ready to find a new home...PM me

  11. #11
    sch
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    Tri bikes are made for those svelte enough to bend at the waist such that the
    back is close to parallel to the ground, not quite, but close. If you have the
    physique for this and the ability to average in the low to mid 20s then the
    tri posture will cut your wind resistance significantly, good for a 1.5-3mph
    speed increase for the same effort. If your gut and back don't allow this
    posture, tri bikes are not a good idea.

  12. #12
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Perhaps a custom bike like a Seven would fit your needs. Before you recoil at the price, consider that if you are reasonably addicted to LD riding, then you are going to be spending a lot of quality hours in the saddle and may as well get something that really fits and is designed around your riding style.

  13. #13
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sch View Post
    Tri bikes are made for those svelte enough to bend at the waist such that the
    back is close to parallel to the ground, not quite, but close. If you have the
    physique for this and the ability to average in the low to mid 20s then the
    tri posture will cut your wind resistance significantly, good for a 1.5-3mph
    speed increase for the same effort. If your gut and back don't allow this
    posture, tri bikes are not a good idea.
    true, but just the act of getting on the aerobars will lower your profile to the wind - its more about tucking in arms and shoulders @ lower speed to get more benefit than dropping down - so even if you can cruise @ 18 mph on the flats, but are a bit more upright, (bars at a 'club' racing position, not touring, and not pro time trial) your surface area will go down and you may see a 1 -2 mph increase with the same effort. (i have... with no flat back - but with a trad road position with the added bars)

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