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  1. #1
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    Hybrid bike on long ride

    Hi,
    I bought a new bike a few months ago for my 7.5 mile commute to work, it's a Giant FCR 1 http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-GB/...ad/1400/28829/ Since buying it I've started cycling a lot more and am now training for a 200km (125 mile) cycle challenge a significant portion of which is over mountains.

    I'm confident of completing it (i've cycled up to 120km at this stage) but my question is by how much is this hybrid style bike holding me back as opposed to a standard racing bike?

  2. #2
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    H'm.... Kind of hard to say, since I'm not seeing any geometry specs. My best guess is that the FCR 1 is a "flat bar road bike," i.e. its geometry is very similar to a standard road bike, but it uses flat bars instead of drops.

    If that is the case, the FCR will likely work fine for a 125m ride. I'd focus on making a few tweaks (e.g. wider tires, high quality saddle), making sure the bike is in proper mechanical condition, and get yourself into shape.

  3. #3
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    Why the wider tyres? Currently they are 26mm. I thought narrower tyres would be more suitable like a racing bike.

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    Probably 5 to 7 miles per hour.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ilmooz's Avatar
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    The biggest difference you'll probably experience will come when you're battling a headwind. You're going to be slowed by not being able to get into the same tucked riding position you can be in on a road bike. Other than that, the FCR should prove to be a fairly fast, comfortable bike to use on a long distance ride.

  6. #6
    Needs to Ride More hxzero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitz View Post
    Why the wider tyres? Currently they are 26mm. I thought narrower tyres would be more suitable like a racing bike.
    If it's over mountains, there will likely be stretches where the roads aren't so good. You don't want to have a tiny little 700x19c pumped up to 160psi, as this will be uncomfortable for long distances. 26 is pretty wide already, maybe a 28c might work well for you too.

    Your bike does look like a flat bar road bike. If possible, you could ask your LBS for some info on how you could make the switch to drops or some other type of bar with more hand positions, as this is crucial for longer distances.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hxzero View Post
    Your bike does look like a flat bar road bike. If possible, you could ask your LBS for some info on how you could make the switch to drops or some other type of bar with more hand positions, as this is crucial for longer distances.
    Bar ends. The long ones with a curve give at least a couple more hand positions. A lot less expensive than a new bar, shifters, levers, etc.

  8. #8
    BreakingWind BreakingWind's Avatar
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    Its significant in terms of both speed and energy output by the rider. I once rode a century on a hybrid - bought a road bike a month later and have never been sorry. Lack of multiple hand positions and aerodynamics are the culprits IMO. I realize that many people ride the hybrids over long distances all the time, but I believe they are best suited for MUP;s, commuting, etc., with moderate mileage. The fact that they are hybrid indicates that they are a compromise between road and trail, and don't function as well in either environment as a bike specifically designed for the job.

  9. #9
    Senior Member teamcompi's Avatar
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    It does not look like it but road bikes, given all things being equal more comfortable and quicker than hybrids. I find that with the drops it gives more ways to ride and ways to distribute weight. On hills especially it will allow one to pull up on the bars. I have both sorts of bikes the hybrid is great for commuting, but for road riding I use the road bike.

    To answer your question, a good road bike will likely increase your speed by 8 km an hour get back to after you have had it a while and tell us.

  10. #10
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    Rather than talking about specific types of bikes, I will say that at least a conservative road bike position is what will make the most difference. This is mainly because the slightly more forward and down position makes better use of all the muscles that contribute to pedaling effort. If you can simulate that position on your hybrid by proper positioning of the flat bar (hopefully with added bar ends and bar cut down to proper width for you if necessary) and also the saddle, you can get the same advantage. Of course, the fact that the hybrid weighs more and uses heavier, sloppier tires is going to make a long trip much harder. The internet seems to have created the myth that big, fat, lower pressure tires will give the same performance as road tires. Whether you accept that or consider it a load of bull is up to you.

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone. I'll let you know if i survive the 200km.

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