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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 08-27-08, 02:41 PM   #1
SirGrant
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Century coming up New bike or old bike

I am doing the Best Buddies charity century coming up Sept. 5th. This will be my first century (farthest I've gone previously is 80 miles). I have to make a choice. I've been riding my current bike a old steel Nishiki which weights about 30 pounds. I'm comfortable on it and race crits and stuff on it. I also do regular 40ish mile rides on it.

However my friend is currently building me a new bike with a felt aluminum frame with some carbon parts (fork ect.). He says it should probably be completed by this weekend.

I'm currently in a debacle over which bike to ride. Because fact is next week I'm very busy so I'll only be able to get maybe one or two rides on the new bike. Although I will have time to get it fit for me by my LBS. I'm wondering which one I should take.

BTW my Nishiki is pretty old, it's from the 80's so it's kinda beat up a little bit so sometimes people will look at me funny. I think it might be kind of weird to show up to the ride because I know some pro teams are going to be there like CSC and T-mobile. But if that is what you guys think I should do I'll show up on it.
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Old 08-27-08, 02:54 PM   #2
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Do not attempt to break in a new bike on a century ride unless you're dead certain on the fit. (as in, it's identical to the bike your currently ride distance on) Otherwise you're just asking for some massive soreness.

(edit)

Who cares what a pro team, or anyone else, thinks about your bike? I rode quite a few miles of STP with a guy on a chipped up mid-80s Raliegh converted to a single speed. I don't recall the fast paceliners pointing and laughing as they sped past us.

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Old 08-27-08, 02:55 PM   #3
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i'd say go for whichever one is the most comfortable, unless you plan on breaking (personal or not) records on your ride.
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Old 08-27-08, 03:04 PM   #4
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Nope, not going for any personal records or anything. Heck doing 100 miles will be a personal best for me (as mentioned above the farthest I've gone before is 80 at one time). However, I mean I want to do well. It's like the conflict is because I think on the new bike I won't have to spend as much energy because it will be about half the weight. On the other hand I won't be totally used to it. Actually though butt wise I think it will be more comfortable because I think it will have a better seat.

My old one though the thing is I'm totally used to riding it but I think over the course of the day I'll blow a lot more energy riding it.
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Old 08-27-08, 03:41 PM   #5
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if you're doing a mountain climb of some kind, then the lighter bike would make sense.

otherwise, i'd just go with whatever is more comfortable (which sounds like the old bike, since the new one is an unknown at this point).
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Old 08-28-08, 06:22 PM   #6
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Old bike.
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Old 08-31-08, 01:46 PM   #7
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Contrary advice here, and I did my first century on a brand-new bike. I bought it on the Thursday, had a gentle test ride on the Saturday, and did 100 miles on Sunday. It was lighter than my previous bike, and had a triple, which I welcomed for the hills. And I never regretted it.

I'd say if you are confident in the fit, like the bike, and have done a few miles on it (my shake-down ride was about 25 miles), go for it.
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Old 08-31-08, 09:39 PM   #8
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I did an organized ride ou in the desert. On my way out from the postride meal, I enconterd 3 riders with bike trouble. On had a crooked rim and 2 with flats. They were out of tubes and bad rim strip. They had no idea what to do. I fixed up the rim and gave them some electrical tape for the rim. Then I lectured them on riding wiht a brand new bike, unproven!

It was close to getting dark when I had decided to take the sideroads out of town. I think they were lucky cuse nobody knew they were out there. Gave them my tubes then sent them on their way. Bike were only one week old and onlyh had 50 miles on them, 3 new bikes!

No new bikes on big rides, just asking for trouble.

BTW, If I ever get a chance to ride with Lance, I aint buying no $30 TT bike!
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Old 08-31-08, 09:55 PM   #9
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If you've been riding steel, you may not like the feel of aluminum (carbon notwithstanding). I don't think a long ride is where you want to find that out!

I'm doing a century on Saturday (I hope) on my 80's steel tourer, but in my case there was no debate about a new bike because I'm poor. I think my bike's lighter than yours, though - about 25lb, which is cancelled out by all the crap I seem to haul everywhere I go.

I may try to squeak a new wheelset on there though (I don't really need ALL my textbooks for the first day of class do I?). My front wheel is making an unpleasant noise that I thought was brake rub but now seems to be hub related (eek!).
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Old 09-01-08, 09:59 AM   #10
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+1 on the old bike.

Even if your ride has a lot of climbing I'd do it on the tried-but-true heavy bike before trying to break in the new bike.
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Old 09-02-08, 02:24 PM   #11
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If its not too late for you to read this I am plus 2 on the old bike.
What is 30 pounds compared to what you are adapted and fitted to?
My newest randonee bike is right at 27 pounds and I dont give a rat's behind that I have another bike that weighs 17 pounds....
Will 10 pounds make a difference on climbs? yes... But I am USED TO the heavyweight and I could certainly lose a lot more weight myself in comparison to my steed.
I hope you have a great trip!
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Old 09-03-08, 11:19 AM   #12
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I would go with the old one. I have tempermental knees and if I do a long ride on a bike I don't ride often, I have problems. Why risk riding the new bike. Probably would work fine, but how pissed would you be if you couldn't finish due to bike issues or body issues! Build up to longer rides on the new bike to make sure you don't have any bad reactions.
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Old 09-03-08, 03:17 PM   #13
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Either bike will be fine -- I like the maiden voyage of my new bikes to be a century. Carry a multitool so you can adjust on the road if you need to. If you have any concerns about comfort or fitness, you should stick with your old ride.
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Old 09-03-08, 06:46 PM   #14
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Wait... You race crits on a 30 pound bike but have never ridden over 80 miles? How is that possible?

But anyway, old bike. New bike is just asking for trouble. Seat, adjustmenst. Don't do it.
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Old 09-04-08, 01:39 AM   #15
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I would suggest going with the new bike, but put the saddle from the old
bike on the new bike for the century. Take along a few basic tools just
in case of minor adjust problems. Later you can evaluate the saddle for
longevity problems. Also don't ride in new shoes, use the ones that
work and swap pedals if necessary.
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Old 09-04-08, 02:14 PM   #16
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Quote:
"I'm currently in a debacle over which bike to ride" -
Yeah, or maybe a dilemma - instead. Except, there seems to a clear, favorable choice - which means you are in neither a "debacle" nor dilemma, oh well.......
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Old 09-04-08, 03:30 PM   #17
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So, SirGrant, the big ride's tomorrow. Have you decided which bike? Inquiring minds want to know.

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