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  1. #1
    Member ToddBS's Avatar
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    Casseroll seems to be the default "Intro to Rando 101" bike?

    I'm interested in getting into riding brevets. Fortunately the brevet series in my neck of the woods is done for this year so I have until next to get ready. Loaded touring is not my goal here; I already have a LHT for that. From what I've been reading here in this forum, a lot of folks are getting a Salsa Casseroll as their first rando bike, and even a lot of experienced LD riders seem to really like it.

    I guess my question is then, if my budget is not exactly huge, is the Salsa the way to go? I can get a frameset for under $500 and I already have a ton of parts lying around. I'm sure I'll have to get some more here and there, but I have the time. I think I even have a complete Shimano Sora group on another (aluminum and slightly smallish go-fast type) bike that I don't ride (nor like very much) that I could move over. Not exactly top of the line, but it isn't bottom either.

    Also a final question would be as to what specific disadvantages a touring rig like the LHT poses in a randonneuring event.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Just because a lot of other randoneurs like it doesn't necessarily mean that you will. There are several questions that you need to ask. Does the bike fit you? Have you been fitted? Is that frame going to do all the things that you want it to do? If the answer is yes to all those then it might be the perfect bike for you but only you can answer that. If you are just wondering about the quality of the frame set, it's a fine entry level frame. Salsa is a great manufacturer and makes quality stuff. Hope that helps!
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  3. #3
    cycles per second Gonzo Bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddBS View Post
    Also a final question would be as to what specific disadvantages a touring rig like the LHT poses in a randonneuring event.
    bling factor

    and maybe a bit slower in the finishing sprint

  4. #4
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
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    IME, a bike like the LHT is great for loaded touring (hence the name), but not so well suited to more "performance oriented" stuff like randonneuring. The stability and comfort are great, but performance not so much so. Not that it's inherently slow, but more that it "gets in the way" of going quickly when you need or want to. A lighter, livelier bike, like the Casseroll is better suited to the type of riding most randos do. Whether it works for you is a different question. If you can, take one out on an "extended" test ride (at least 20 miles). And make sure it's set up to fit you as well as possible. That'll give you a pretty good idea of how it'd work for you.

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  5. #5
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    There are plenty of good bikes / frames out there for LD riding. That said the Salsa has some good aspects for LD (steel frame, can take wide tires/fenders etc) and may be a great frame for you, but it all comes down to fit.

    The LHT should be fine for long distances as long as speed is not a critical factor.

  6. #6
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    If your budget is tight, you're comfortable for long rides on the LHT, and you're just trying out randonneuring, you might want to start using the LHT running a lighter and snappier set of wheels, which you can always transfer to a new build.
    Last edited by zowie; 09-01-09 at 01:57 PM.

  7. #7
    Member ToddBS's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips.

    I actually came close to buying a Casseroll once before to use as my commuter, but the LBS called me back to say that QBP had given an exclusive Salsa distributorship to another shop in the area (one that I do not care for) and they only had just found out themselves. Odd since I bought my Surly from them, which is another QBP brand, but that's a puzzle for another time. Anyway, given the geometry charts and my previous fittings I know what size I need so that isn't an issue.

    I probably will hold off on it though. I may try a century or two on the LHT and possibly a 200k next year on it as I think it's speedy enough to finish that distance in the time allotted. I also have a 650b bike (a Rawland Sogn) that I am in the process of building up so that may see some action as well. It may end up lighter than the LHT, and if it proves viable then I likely won't need another.

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