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Old 02-23-10, 01:51 PM   #1
crisssamor02
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Difference between Clipless Pedals

Someone please HELP! I just purchased my first bike and I am completely lost on the differences between clipless pedals and what shows I should purchase. I was recommend to purchase Keo Easy pedals but I don't know the difference between Look Keo Easy regular which starts at $80 or Keo Easy Classic Pedals which starts at $120? Also what shoes should I purchase with them? I am on a budget and I don't want to exceed $80. The bike I have is a Cannondale Six 6.
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Old 02-27-10, 08:58 PM   #2
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I believe the difference between the Easy and Classic (I don't believe there is an Easy Classic) is the easy doesn't have a tension adjustment. Which in my opinion is a downside, but that's a subjective opinion.

As for shoes, you generally looking at the smooth bottomed roadie type shoe. Shoes are a personal choice. I prefer Lake.

You might want to try some of the cheaper clipless pedals if your unsure of what you really want. Personally I like the Crank Brothers line, I use the Mallets on my long distance rides due to the platform size and the MTB type shoe.
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Old 03-01-10, 08:28 PM   #3
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Thank you so much! Very helpfull
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Old 03-02-10, 01:27 AM   #4
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Why Look pedals? As dobber suggested, I recommend looking into mountain bike pedals and shoes - retaining the ability to walk normally in bike shoes is a must for me. Shimano makes some excellent road-style pedals that use MTB cleats (Shimano A520 or the newer A600 that are about to be released).
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Old 03-02-10, 01:43 AM   #5
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Everyone has different opinions on what pedals to use, so it's gotta be a decision you make for yourself.
I see that you posted this in long distance cycling, and I agree with the previous poster that you probably don't want road shoes and road type clipless pedals (look, speedplay, etc). If you plan to do any off the bike activities (walking, stopping for a break, or even trying to pee in an outhouse!) it's really easier to have mountain style pedals and shoes. My pedals of choice are the eggbeaters. I've found that they work very well for me, and I like have the additional float they provide on longer rides. I've always found shimano mtn style pedals to be much more difficult to predict the engage and disengage points which is the only reason I don't like them (although they may have improved since I last rode with them 5+ years ago). Another counter-point to what I'm saying though is mtn style pedals and shoes don't offer as much "platform" (flat connection to the pedal) as road pedals do. So if you plan on really "hammering" for a long distance that may be something to consider. You'll get better power transfer to the pedals using road pedals than mtn pedals.
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Old 03-03-10, 01:21 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandjeanius View Post
I've always found shimano mtn style pedals to be much more difficult to predict the engage and disengage points which is the only reason I don't like them (although they may have improved since I last rode with them 5+ years ago). Another counter-point to what I'm saying though is mtn style pedals and shoes don't offer as much "platform" (flat connection to the pedal) as road pedals do. So if you plan on really "hammering" for a long distance that may be something to consider. You'll get better power transfer to the pedals using road pedals than mtn pedals.
I've never had a problem with engaging or disengaging Shimano SPDs. As for the decreased platform, I've found that the stiffness of the sole of the shoe is as important as the size of the platform on the pedal. When using MTB shoes with carbon soles, the pressure is sufficiently distributed across my foot; when using shoes with a softer sole, then the pressure has been too focused.
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Old 03-03-10, 01:29 AM   #7
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I am not much on the pedal area theory of power transfer and foot comfort noted above but the
general idea of ATB shoes with their recessed smaller cleats versus road shoes with their larger
exposed cleats and thus greater discomfort off the bike in walking and slipperiness on tiled floors
make ATB shoes the obvious choice. I have tried Crank Brothers and found them hard to clip into
and sometimes harder to clip out of and not as comfy as my Speedplay Frogs which are easy in/out
and comfortable to any mileage so far. Shoes come in several quality levels with the biggest
discriminator being sole stiffness. Soles of bike shoes should not be bendable. If you wear a
D or E, EE width there are not too many shoes in that width. the vast majority of bike shoes are
B/C width. Shimano, Lake and Sidi have wider shoes but they are not easy to find. SPD or Crank
Bro platform are a good compromise and pedals are available in sub $80 range. The cheap Cranks
at $40-50 have simplified bearings and construction and are short lived. SPD pedals are generic
and double sided versions or platform variants are usually easy to clip in and out of and are comfortable.
Shoes should be over sized, large enough for an insert (they come with cardboard only inside the
shoe) to allow for the swelling that feet do after long mileage. A tite shoe to start will get
excrutiatingly tight after 30-50 miles.

Last edited by sch; 03-03-10 at 01:33 AM.
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