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Thread: 2010 Brevets

  1. #1
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    2010 Brevets

    Are you riding brevets this year ... just for fun or to increase your chances of getting into the PBP? Tell us about your brevets when you complete them.

  2. #2
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    March 5th, Rowan and I drove about 150 km to Lancefield and arrived here in pouring rain. We spent the evening setting up our bicycles and gathering all our wet weather gear together.

    March 6th, Rowan and I rode our first 200K brevet since early 2008!! 205 km in total!!

    It was a relief to see clear skies when we set off for the Start/Finish area in the morning, but we still carried our wet weather gear with us just in case. At about 6:30 a fairly large assortment of riders gathered for the 7 am start. There were rides of several distances going on ... 100K, 200K, 300K, 400K, and 600K. Rowan and I opted for the 200K.

    At 7 am, we all started, and just when I was starting to settle into the ride, about 5 km down the road, I flatted!! The same thing happened on my 100K two weeks previous!! We determined that the problem was not the brand new tire I put on, but rather the rim tape which is old, worn, and out of place. Rowan fixed it as best he could and we fixed the flat and set off again. Fortunately Rowan's fix worked and I did not flat again for the rest of the ride.

    Shortly after the flat we rode into an area of heavy, wet fog. We could hardly see, and our glasses kept misting up from the fog. The fog went on for kilometers ... kilometer after kilometer of white.

    Finally, about 60 km into the ride, with about 40 km to go to the turn-around, we got out of the fog and into sunshine. Then it started heating up which combined with the humidity made it rather uncomfortable, and we stopped to shed some layers. From there all the way into Bendigo, it was warm and sunny.

    Our control in Bendigo was a pleasant little 24-hour store where we had sandwiches and squares, and coke before heading back.

    As we were leaving Bendigo, we could see storms forming in the distance ... where we were headed. As we rode, more and more clouds formed above us ... and then it started to rain. But only for 5 or 10 minutes at a time. We would discuss stopping to put on our jackets, and then the rain would stop. Then, all of a sudden it was like we rode into a fridge. One minute the temperature was fairly warm ... the next minute the temperature dropped. And shortly after that we put on the jackets.

    It continued to rain on and off all the way back, with several loud rumbles of very close thunder around. We noticed hail heaped up on the side of the road, and found out when we got in that quite a number of the other cyclists had been caught in that hail. And then we found out on the news that Melbourne had a superstorm during the day and was blanketed in hail, some as large as golf balls, and waist-deep flooding in the CBD.

    We stopped for a bite to eat in one little town, and when we set off again, I struggled. I felt like a hamster in a wheel ... like I was riding for all I was worth and getting nowhere. But apparently that bit of road is like that. It's a long, long gradual climb, but some of it is a false flat ... it doesn't look like anything, but it is. We had a great run out to Bendigo, but the route there came out of the highlands and into flatlands, and then we had to climb back out again. Fortunately when we finally got to the top, I was able to pick up a bit of speed again.

    We rolled in after 11 hours and 48 minutes of cycling ... with 1 hour and 42 minutes before the cut off. I was really pleased with that time!!

    And then, we ordered a chicken pizza to eat while watching Australian Rules Football in our room.


    That was an offical 200K brevet which means that, if we wanted, Rowan and I could apply for the PBP two weeks earlier now.


    And photos ... the ones marked 06Mar10_YMBC: http://www.flickr.com/photos/1430288...7622681266839/

  3. #3
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    I'm working on my RUSA R-12 award (a 200k brevet or permanent each month for 12 consecutive months), so I'll be riding brevets/perms on occasion. I've got 4 done. And some pictures posted elsewhere on the internet.

    I'm sort of planning to do a 300k this summer, but am not working on PBP other longer events at the moment. (PBP would be of more interest if it was a 12-day 1200k ride, and if airfare was free, both about equally likely).

    For what it's worth, my last 200k was actually the first ACP ride I've done, so I went ahead and got my medal. Pretty cool. Don't know that I'd need to collect a bucketful of the things, though.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

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    So far this year I've done San Francisco Randonneurs (SFR) Point Reyes Lighthouse 200k (01/23) and the SFR Russian River 300k (02/27). I'll be doing the SFR Healdsburg/Hopland 400k on 03/27. The longest ride I'd done before this year was the Davis Bike Club 200k last March. So I'm setting new personal distance records every month. I plan on doing at least a 600k this year to finish off an SR series, and I'm also hoping to do the Santa Cruz 1000k in June. I've looked at this year's brevet schedule, and it looks like I could easily do a brevet every month from January thorugh October or November, so if I do all of those, I could finish off an R-12 with just a couple of permanents. I don't know if I'll go for that this year, though. I figure doing a 1000k this year will be invaluable prep for PBP next year, and the more brevet experience of any length I can get in, the better.

    Keith
    Keith Hearn

  5. #5
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    I had a 200, 300 and 400k already this year. It's been -c-o-l-d-, for Florida, and the DNF's among the group have been higher than last year as a reult. I managed to get through o.k. The 200k was the worst, 40 degrees and rain all day. On the 400k, cold but dry, I was able to cut two hours off my time from last year, so I guess I'm making progress.
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  6. #6
    Senior Member The Octopus's Avatar
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    I did the 200k and 300k this year; missed the two local 400ks (due to arrival of kid #2; best reason ever for missing out on cycling). I'll do the 600k next month and then the local 1000k this October.

    More interested in doing the brevets because they're fun than as part of the PBP qualification, though that's a nice incidental benefit. Definitely "in" for PBP in '11.

    This is my second season of riding these things fixed and I'm really enjoying it, even more than I enjoyed brevets on geared bikes (and that was still a heck of a lot of fun). Will almost certainly be riding PBP fixed.

  7. #7
    Commuter & cyclotourist brianogilvie's Avatar
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    I'm a newbie: until this year my longest rides had been 50 miles in one day and an 88-mile tour in two days. This year I decided to try a 200K and, if I like it, try to do the rest of a super randonneur series. I'm aiming for the Berkshire Brevets Sheburne Falls 200K on April 24. I could do the 300K and 400K in the Berkshire Brevets series too, but I'd have to do a 600K in France or England the weekend of June 26 (there's one in Brittany that looks interesting, as well as one in Wales and one in Yorkshire).

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    Senior Member wirehead's Avatar
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    I did the SF Randonneurs 200km in Jan ( http://www.wirewd.com/bike/blog/200km_2010_brevet/ ) as my first brevet ever. Like Machka, I did my first brevet on a mountain bike, although that's partially because it was my only bike.

    Crashed but walked to the finish in time, missed the next set of SF Randonneurs brevets and am looking to get back on track and riding a 300km next.

  9. #9
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Just finished another 200k yesterday, and I've got back to back weekends of 300k rides lined up for the following 2 weeks.

    All my ride reports are on my blog: Permanent Clydesdale
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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    I've done the Central Florida 300 & 400 so far this year and am planning on doing the 600. I have conflicts for all of the Gainesville FL brevets, unfortunately. I'm planning on the 1000k around Lake Ontario in early July, will likely do some other brevets out of Ontario Canada before that and I'm signed up for the 1001 Miglia (1600 kms). As last year, I'll do whatever fits into the schedule.

    They are running a "hell week" in early June north of Toronto, with a 200, 300, 400, 600 all in one week. I'm conflicted because it overlaps with the Shenandoah ... I'll have to make my choice soon.
    Dave

  11. #11
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
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    Last Saturday (3/20) was the Oregon Randonneurs (and my) first brevet of 2010.

    The "Birkie" (Forest Grove to Birkenfeld and back) is an ORR tradition, and this year was the first that anyone could remember that had clear (and dry!) weather all day. The day started out downright chilly: there were reports of frost and ice in the first third of the ride, but I personally didn't notice any. By the finish, temps were in the mid to upper 60s (f). All in all, quite a nice day for a ride. I finished in my usual mid-pack spot, despite having had a lot of trouble lately with sore legs and, ahem, "intestinal issues".

    Up next: the ORR "3 Capes" 300k on April 3.

    SP
    Bend, OR

  12. #12
    Senior Member Daveyboy's Avatar
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    Did my first official brevet two weekends ago - 200k.
    Did another brevet last Saturday - 200k.
    I'm doing another brevet tomorrow - 300k, YIKES!

    This one's on familiar roads, and I've diligently studied the map and compared to the cue sheet just to make sure, you know. I really don't want anymore bonus miles on this one.

    I'm new to brevets this year, but not that new to LD riding - just not this early in the year.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Madsnail's Avatar
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    I did my first brevet yesterday, a 200k in Osterdorf, Germany. It was a great experience, I certainly learned a lot.
    I was rather well prepared physically, and I had no problem finishing, but I realized I was totally unprepared for all the rest. I had no time to check the route on a map in advance, so no real idea of where we were going, and I didn't have anything to hold the cue sheet. Even then, my German is pretty bad so I am not sure I would really have understood the sheet correctly. It's sort of okay deciphering it now that I am sitting at my desk, but I would have been in trouble trying to follow it on the road.
    Fortunately, this is a popular event in the region, there were maybe about 130 randonneurs at the start and I never found myself alone. I have many people to thank for guiding me!

    There was quite a lot of climbing, my bike computer says 2400m, though I don't think this was quite that much. The worst was a part at 15% that was rather nasty, and another long-ish bit at 11% in the last 5km.

    I've also registered for the 300k on 23.04, in Osterdorf too, and by then I will have installed a cue sheet holder and I will have checked the route in advance.

  14. #14
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    I did the San Francisco Randonneurs 400k on Saturday. It was a very, um, interesting experience. That long of a ride gives plenty of time for changes to take place. For instance, how many of you have started a ride feeling perfectly healthy and come down with a cold during the course of the ride? We started out crossing the Golden Gate Bridge Saturday at 6 am, and I felt fine for the first 40 or so miles, then suddenly my legs started loosing their strength and I couldn't keep up with the group of riders I had caught up to earlier. At the time, I figured it was the mile or so of 12% grade we had recently gone up.

    I kept chugging along while noticing odd noises coming from the bike's drivetrain, kind of like a misaligned RD, but more intermittent. I figured I'd take a good look at the first control, but before I got there, the chain started completely slipping. I stopped and looked, and discovered that the chain had slipped down between my two biggest cogs. Closer examination revealed that the cogs were slipping back and forth on the freehub body because the lockring had come loose. Anybody familiar with the military term "Charlie Foxtrot"? In this case, it was very appropriate. Fortunately, I was carrying a Stein Mini Cassette Lock tool and was able to put it back together.

    As I rode the last few miles to the control, I was considering turning around and just riding back to the start because I just wasn't feeling very good and I knew from the elevation profile I had seen that there was a very significant climb right after the control. It would have been a 200k day, but I decided to stick it out. I was out here to overcome challenges, wasn't I?

    At the first control, I was drinking some apple juice when I notice my front tire looked odd. Turns out it was completely flat. When I took the wheel off the bike, the reason was obvious, a very large fishhook was sticking into the sidewall. Trying to pull a barbed fishhook out of a tire is pretty much impossible without destroying one or the other. Fortunately, the manager of the store that was our control point had a pair of pliers with wire cutters, so it was the fishhook that got destroyed. By the time I was done and ready to go, I was the only rider left at the control, so I was pretty sure I was the last rider on the road. Bleah.

    The big hill after that control lived up to its reputation. It is ironically named "Joy Road", and was mostly 12-15% grade, and 3 or so miles long. Hmmm, doing the math, that would be 1900 feet of climbing. It wasn't quite that much, but I do vaguely recall a few flat bits along the way. I got up it, but suffered. The descent was nice, though, beautiful forests. I suppose there were nice forests on the way up, but I didn't see anything by the pavement 10 feet in front of me on the way up. And it wasn't even very nice pavement.

    There was a very nice stretch of the Bohemian Highway that followed, which was mostly 1-2% downgrade, which gave me plenty of opportunity to recover. I'd say it was the high point of the day. I pulled into the next control, the Guerneville Safeway, and saw a few riders eating, but by the time I had gotten in and out with some food, they were all in the process of leaving. I ate quickly and headed out alone again, after taking off a layer of clothing.

    It was now about 70 degrees (F), and quite pleasant out, so I was wondering why my nose was still running like crazy. I understood it earlier, since it had been somewhat cold, but it was nice and warm at that point. I figured it must be an allergy, which seemed odd, since I don't have much in the way of pollen allergies. My legs still felt dead, but I slogged onward. Turning around was out of the question, since I didn't want to go back up the backside of Joy Rd.

    I knew there was one more climb of similar height to Joy Rd. ahead of me, but it was on a state highway, so I hoped the roadbuilders had put sane limits on the grades. It turns out they had. It was 4-5% the whole way, including a few switchbacks. It was just as high (a little higher I think), but I could get in a low gear and spin my way up, so it wasn't nearly as bad. Just before I started the climb, I got passed by another randonneur on a recumbant, I think he had stopping for food in the town I had just passed. I passed him on the climb, which made me feel a little better. Then the course turned onto a smaller road and headed down. Then up. After a couple of miles of 6% or so climbing, I stopped at a summit to refill water bottles, and the recumbant rider caught up to me. We chatted for a few minutes, and I suggested he start first, since he would no doubt descent faster (which he did). The road went down at about 6%, then up at about 6%, then down at 6%, and so on for a while. When it finally hit flat ground about a mile from Hopland (the halfway control), I was really happy to be able to just be able to ride on flat ground. There were still a few people at the mini-mart that was the control. In the pre-ride info, we had been warned that we should expect headwinds going south from Hopland and being in a group was highly advised. So I tried to get turned around as quickly as possible. The sandwich I bought was too dry for me to eat quickly, so I stuck it in my h-bar bag for later and got ready to go with the last 3 riders.

    Joining up with them was the best thing I did the entire ride. Heading south on Hwy 101 from Hopland was headwind the whole way. We took turns pulling and when I got to the front, I was so glad that I wasn't dealing with the wind by myself. I think I took pulls that were about half as long as the other 3 were doing, but I just had nothing in my legs. I figured it was just from the two very steep climbs earlier in the day. Around sunset I started noticing a familiar sound from my rear wheel, and called a stop so I could check it out and we could put on lights and reflector gear. Yes, the lockring was loose again. This was at the 150 mile point, so I had made it 100 miles since the first time it came loose. I put it back together and hoped it would make it it the 100 miles to the finish.

    I had been feeling weaker and weaker, and was just barely managing to hang on at some points. One of the other riders mentioned that we had about 10 miles of rolling hills just ahead of us, and I told them that I wasn't sure I could stay with the group on rollers, so they shouldn't feel like they had to wait for me. It turns out that everyone else had been thinking that they might have similar problems. So we headed out into the darkening evening taking it nice and easy and I managed to stay with them through the rollers.

    Later on though, I was having a hard time riding in the paceline on the flats. It was taking all of my concentration just to keep on the wheel in front of me, and I wasn't feeling like I could eat or drink safely or even look at my cue sheet, so I eventually dropped off the back and rode by myself. I figured I could crawl to the finish. By this time the winds had died, so being in a paceline wasn't as much of a benefit as it had been earlier. I also figured the others would be be able to finish much more quickly without me.

    I was surprised a few miles later as I came to an intersection, to see a headlight coming towards me, then do a u-turn as I went past. It was one of the other riders, coming back to make sure I was OK. The other two were stopped a little ways after the turn. As I was approaching them, I was thinking of what to say to tell them to just go on without me, but never got the chance to say it. We started off again, and I got dropped again, and a while later they were stopped, waiting for me again. Sometime around Santa Rosa I drank a Red Bull energy shot, which helped a bit. We eventually made it to the next control, the Safeway in Petaluma around midnight. I was really looking forward to some hot soup because I was getting cold, but the deli was closed. I still couldn't eat the sandwich I had bought in Hopland, it was just too dry. So I bought some cold potato salad, which at least went down easily. While I was eating, I could feel that I was on the verge of shivering, even though it was in the mid-40s and I was wearing gear that had kept me quite comfortable down below freezing on my commutes. I knew we had a couple of valleys ahead of us that had been the coldest part of the trip out, and would probably be significantly cooler than Petaluma was. About then I noticed that one of the other guys was visibly shivering as well. We all put on all of the clothing we had. I had a pair of chemical toe heaters that I put in my shoes, then I put on my rain booties, my rain legs, and a windbreaker that I had in reserve. We spent over an hour in that Safeway, but eventually all of us were feeling warmer, so we headed out around 1 am.

    When we had arrived at the Safeway, there were a few other riders already there who were also suffering from the cold. I think they were planning on DNFing and calling someone for a ride, but by the time we were ready to go, they had also warmed up and headed out with us. We had 4 more climbs to go in the last 50 miles to the finish, but at this point I think we were mostly worried about the cold descents. The hour long stop did wonders for me and I was actually leading on the climbs. I was very glad to have 24x26 gearing. We stopped to regroup at the top of each hill and pushed on. It was down around 38 degrees in a couple of the valleys, but I was doing ok at that point. The windbreaker made a great vapor barrier, although it was a bit warm on the climbs.

    The finish was on the south end of the Golden Gate Bridge, which requires a final climb up from Sausalito. We regrouped at the top and rode together across the bridge to the finish at about 5:20am. I had been hoping to finish at around 22 hours, but I was certainly satisfied with being under 24 hours. Heck, I was just glad to have finished at that point. I have never been so happy to see a crock pot of hot chicken-noodle soup in my life.

    This was the longest ride I've ever done, and definitely the hardest. I went home and got to bed at 7am, and woke up at noon and dragged myself out of bed. I was tired and achy, which I suppose was to be expected, but I also had a stuffed up head. At that point I started to suspect that I had come down with a cold in the course of the ride. The feeling of fatigue and aches that you get from a cold is remarkably like the feeling of aches and fatigue after a nearly 24 hour ride. Combining them is not recommended.

    After a full nights sleep, I was still achy on Monday (expected), but my head was still foggy all day, which I wouldn't expect from the ride. Today I'm mostly better, but still a little achy and I can tell I'm not 100% in the alertness department, either. Plus, I still have a bit of a runny nose.

    All-in-all, it was not what I'd consider to be a fun time. Coming down with a cold in the middle of a ride is not recommended. Not even realizing that you're coming down with a cold does not help. Or maybe it does... If I had realized what was going on, I probably would have bailed out, rather than suffering though it all. But on the other hand, I'm kinda proud of myself for pushing through to the end, even though I felt pretty lousy. I took up randonneuring to give myself challenge to overcome, and I did manage to overcome this one.

    Keith
    Keith Hearn

  15. #15
    convert TommyL's Avatar
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    Last year my goal was to do the series. I got sick after the Spring 200k and missed the 300k. We left the country to travel before the summer/fall series, so I got a big FAIL on my goal.

    We got back from our travels three weeks ago, and I'm trying to make up for 6 months off the bike, and being in the worse shape of my life (I'm a pretty fit 26 year old guy, so that's not saying a ton, but I am pretty out of it).

    My goal this year is the same as last year, but I am going for the summer series (not for PBP, just for the challenge). It is hard right now because 1 1/2 hours at a moderate pace seems like a big workout. That wasn't even true when I started cycling, because my cardio system was in such better condition. I have a long way to go, but I am looking forward to starting the series in July!

  16. #16
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    we are running a populaire, 200k, 300k and fall dirt 200k here in burlington, vt.
    information on the boston brevet series website or the RUSA calendar.

    as soon as we are RUSA certified i'll have some webpages up with more information...

  17. #17
    Senior Member downtube42's Avatar
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    Posted another thread but it should have been here - I completed my first brevet two weeks ago, a 200k in Columbus OH. We were really quite lucky with the weather for late March. It was a bit cold in the morning with a bit of a headwind in the last leg, but at least it was dry! Overall it was a nice introduction to randonneuring. Next weekend is a 300k, also in Columbus. I've ridden the 200k distance a couple times before, but 300k is uncharted territory for me. I think the whole key for me is to eat enough, particularly early.

    I've promised myself I'd ride a 200k and 300k. From that we'll see whether I'm interested in anything further
    This has to be a tie between re-frozen slushy uneven dirty ice stuff just right of the nicely plowed pavement, and super-glassy ice with a dusting of fresh powder - SalshShark

  18. #18
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
    I've promised myself I'd ride a 200k and 300k. From that we'll see whether I'm interested in anything further
    My first season I did a 200, 300 and 400. The year prior, I rode a well supported double century, so I knew I could do the 300k distance; the 400 was my big challenge. This year (2nd season) I'll be doing a 600 in the fall.
    Many people are trying to convince me to go to Paris next year, but I'm into taking things at a much slower pace as far as increasing my distance. Right now, I've got no plans to do a 1200k.
    I think you've got the right idea with stepping things up gradually.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  19. #19
    **** that mattm's Avatar
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    Haven't done any brevets this year, the race calendar has been too full.

    But I hope to do a few later this summer.

    Decided not to do PBP next year, a huge weight off the shoulders. Maybe 2015? Or maybe the Cascade 1200 eventually..
    cat 1.

    blog

  20. #20
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    Did my first 200km brevet today. first time riding more than 100k, which was 2 weeks ago in the populaire.

    the ride started at 7 am in a small town called chemanius. it was frosty in the morning, but I was dressed for the expected warmer afternoon temps. needless to say my extremeties were not very happy with me, but my legs and torso were fine. I need a handlebar bag in addition to my seat wedge to hold removeable layers. (its on order)

    I felt good and was riding strong, utill at about 130 k I realized the guy I had been riding with, who I had ridden a lot of the hundred k with, was much stronger than I and that it was time (more like too late) to let him go. I did, was passed by two others who soon stopped and made the decision to ride more to my pace so we could all share the headwind. there was a LOT of headwind on this ride. I wasn't feeling particularly great at the 150 k control leg wise, so I took my time loading up on calories. definetly helped me keep pace with a couple other guys with the next 30 or so, but I ended up doing the last hour or so by myself in a fair bit of pain.

    I finished the ride (205km) in about 8:20. ability to walk at end of ride not so great. Would I do it again? defientely. this was a great learning experience and I hope to use it to good effect in the 300 in two weeks.
    All You Haters Suck My Pawls.

  21. #21
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    On Saturday, April 10th Rowan and I rode a 300 km brevet.

    Last weekend my beautiful little blue Marinoni Ciclo, Machak, was stolen from the campground where we were staying. I have been devastated all week. Not only did the theft break my heart, but it also looked like I would not have the chance to ride a 300K brevet this weekend we had been looking forward to.

    However, Rowan managed to put together a "frankenbike" for me to ride consisting of a GT mtn bike frame and gearing with road handlebars, brakes, shifters, and wheels. Frankenbike has platform pedals with toe clips ... and one of Rowan's partially broken in Brooks saddles.

    After two very short test rides (one on the trainer, and one around the parking lot of the motel near the start/finish area), we started the Lingalonga 300.

    6 km out from the start ... I flatted. This seems to be a very regular occurance for me on these events. Weird. On Machak the problem appeared to be slipped rim tape, this time it was a little bit of gravel shaped like an arrowhead.

    Not too long after the clouds started precipitating ... mist, drizzle, rain, fog, more drizzle, a bit more rain, some mist ... and this went on, and on, and on till the 150 km point where it finally started to clear. It continued to clear, and the night ended up being clear and cool ... the sky was full of stars. Fortunately, wind was not a factor on this ride.

    The route was supposed to be flat. This was partially why I wanted to ride it. And it was flat ... except for the hills. Flat brevets are the ones in Manitoba, Canada where you might encounter a couple overpasses in 300 km ... this was just mainly flat. The hills were generally gradual and I would have had no trouble at all on them ... if I'd been riding Machak. As it was, I wasn't used to the shifting on Frank, and ended walking a few ... which gave me the chance to stretch, so that wasn't too bad. I also had a minor crash on one. I'd stopped to get off and walk, and in trying to get my leg over the saddle, my foot caught, and over I went.

    The route instructions were pretty good, but there was one notable error ... an instruction to turn left onto Creamery Road. When we got there, Creamery Road was not much more than a gravelly dirt track. We debated about riding it, but decided to continue on and find the next paved road going the right direction. That ended up being the right thing to do, but apparently one rider actually rode Creamery Road.

    I was amused by the cows when we got to Shepparton at the 150 km point. They weren't any ordinary cows. You'll have to wait for the photos.

    By the time night fell, the ride started to feel really long. We could see the taillights of the few cars that passed us ... and see them ... and see them ... and see them ... and continue to see them ... and knew that's where we'd be riding. We'd ride along a particular road ... and half an hour later, I'd feel like I was on the same road again, and an hour later I'd feel like I was on the same road again, like we were riding in circles.

    I was struggling out there because I haven't been eating and sleeping well this past week, and wasn't eating at all well on the ride ... my stomach was unsettled the whole way through. This lack of food, combined with my exhaustion, triggered minor hallucinations. The way Rowan's wheels caught his light made it look like he was being followed by bunnies!!

    In real life, however, we startled an owl sitting on the road, and were followed by bats now and then. That was kind of interesting.

    We could see the glow from the finish town from some way off, but could not see any ground lights. Finally, after what seemed like an incredibly long time, we started encountering the occasional street light, and after some more riding, rode into the finish area.

    We had 20 hours to finish the 300K, and finished it in 18:59 ... 1 hour and 1 minute to spare! I'm just pleased I made it!!

    Frank did well out there. He survived the ride, handled well, and was fairly comfortable. His setup could have been slightly better for a ride of that distance ... and not only do I miss Machak, but I miss my Brooks saddle. I'm sore all over, and have a somewhat bruised butt.

    -------------------------------------------
    Lingalonga 300 Km brevet photos ... including the very interesting cows .. and photos of Frankenbike ...

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/1430288...detail/?page=7

  22. #22
    Senior Member downtube42's Avatar
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    I rode a 300k on Saturday the 10th, as well. It was my first 300k brevet, my second brevet overall, and the first time I've ridden over 200k. It started out cold at 6 am - the forecast called for an overnight low of 36F so it was somewhere in that vicinity. My feet were two blocks of ice for the first couple hours. Later the hills popped up, giving me an opportunity to warm up I hooked up with a fellow BF member riding a Bike Friday, and we stayed together to the finish. We picked up another rider along the way, then a fourth at the last control, heading into the dark. It was nice to have people to chat with, and in the dark was definitely nice to have multiple lights. The afternoon segment was quite warm, and I ended up with sunburns on my legs and nose. I guess that's randonneuring - frozen feet and sunburns in one ride.

    Today I did a 1 mile recovery ride on my unicycle
    This has to be a tie between re-frozen slushy uneven dirty ice stuff just right of the nicely plowed pavement, and super-glassy ice with a dusting of fresh powder - SalshShark

  23. #23
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    2010 Brevets for Team Stokes

    My husband and I just completed our first brevet series, consisting of a 200/300/400/600k. This is our first year of randonneuring. We live in Southern California so we've been able to get the series in, starting in January.
    Having just completed the 600k San Diego brevet 3 days ago I am still recovering from the complete exhaustion, aches and pains, etc. but am thrilled to say we accomplished our goal. I've never climbed 18,600ft before and not sure I want to do it again any time soon, but it's definitely a feather in my cap.
    Now it's time for some serious rest, relaxation and recovery.

  24. #24
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
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    So, Team Stokes, have you signed up for the Cascade 1200 yet?

    Anyway, I just spent 20 min typing up a nice ride report for the Oregon Rando's 3 Capes 300k last weekend, but BF logged me off before I could post it.

    Short story: other than the headwind all day, the weather was good. My finishing time was my second slowest 300k ever (after a personal best on the same course last year). Felt like grim death for the first third of the ride, but things got better from there.

    Next stop: "Eden's Gate" 400k on 5/1.

    SP
    Bend, OR

  25. #25
    Senior Member downtube42's Avatar
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    Is it common to have post-brevet burnout??? I did my first brevet three weeks ago (200k), then a 300k last week. I went for a 20 mile right tonight, which I typically would have enjoyed immensely, and it was.... blah. Not hard, not like I was tired, just not particularly fun. I do like the idea of pushing my limits, but if this is going to detract from my enjoyment of cycling I'm going to reconsider!

    What have veteran randonneurs experienced?
    This has to be a tie between re-frozen slushy uneven dirty ice stuff just right of the nicely plowed pavement, and super-glassy ice with a dusting of fresh powder - SalshShark

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