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  1. #1
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    Training for (approximately) 600k

    I recently completed my first double century (STP), and it wiped me out, even though I have done back-to-back-to-back-to-back... centuries during tours without too much trouble. My new goal is to be able to do back-to-back double centuries a year from now, but I don't know what the best training approach is. Should I just keep doing back-to-back long rides on the weekends, and slowly dial up the mileage, or would it be better to concentrate on extremely long one-day rides with a recovery day afterward?

    Also, how much does interval training help for long-distance rides? I teach high school, so the amount of time I have to train will dramatically decrease come August, and if anyone here has any suggestions for using short rides to train for very long rides, I would appreciate it.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
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    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
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  4. #4
    Two wheels, two skis...
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    Interesting article:

    http://www.adventurecorps.com/way/trainspec.html

    Not a program, but a little perspective. From my experience, training to race seems to be effective at increasing your capacity for distance. I know cat 3 & 4 racers that can do a double without too much trouble in mid season fitness, but they're not doing 8 hour training rides sat and sun every weekend. Far from it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    Should I just keep doing back-to-back long rides on the weekends, and slowly dial up the mileage, or would it be better to concentrate on extremely long one-day rides with a recovery day afterward?
    Neither of those statements represent fundamental approaches to actual training methods.

    When you are riding at distances that require hours and hours of effort, you cannot differentiate training benefits as a result of lengthening a single ride or pair of rides. In other words, if those are your only two training perspectives, it makes no difference which you choose.

    Look, you already possess a great level of fitness. You already have a rich base of long distance experience.

    The best advice is to take what you have learned and understand what training costs are associated with becoming fit for two days of extended riding. It may be that your short comings having to do with pacing, nutrition, break/rest time management are bigger factors that your physical qualities with respect to recovering for multiple-day rides.

    A look at your training log, and a deeper look inside yourself will determine whether it is your body or your mind that could limit big-time miles.

    Although others often tout training "plans" or specific strategies - I've come to appreciate the idea of offering the "theory" of sound advice and letting readers solve their own problems.

    1. You gotta use a log, and know where you are to know where you are going.

    2. You gotta ride as hard as you can some of time - ride like you "stole it." Or ride "for all the marbles."

    3. You gotta know when to rest, and know how to rest as hard as you can, not aimlessly ride around sick or tired.

    4. You gotta do all these things in some sort of golden balance that doesn't destroy your life, your relationships or yourself.

    And you have to do all these things while eating right, cleaning and checking your bike and equipment and giving praise to god or some deity of your choosing and not *****ing and moaning about why you can't ride back-to-back double centuries without "feeling it."
    Last edited by Richard Cranium; 07-12-10 at 03:49 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member lonesomesteve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
    Neither of those statements represent fundamental approaches to actual training methods.

    When you are riding at distances that require hours and hours of effort, you cannot differentiate training benefits as a result of lengthening a single ride or pair of rides. In other words, if those are your only two training perspectives, it makes no difference which you choose.

    Look, you already possess a great level of fitness. You already have a rich base of long distance experience.

    The best advice is to take what you have learned and understand what training costs are associated with becoming fit for two days of extended riding. It may be that your short comings having to do with pacing, nutrition, break/rest time management are bigger factors that your physical qualities with respect to recovering for multiple-day rides.

    A look at your training log, and a deeper look inside yourself will determine whether it is your body or your mind that could limit big-time miles.

    Although others often tout training "plans" or specific strategies - I've come to appreciate the idea of offering the "theory" of sound advice and letting readers solve their own problems.

    1. You gotta use a log, and know where you are to know where you are going.

    2. You gotta ride as hard as you can some of time - ride like you "stole it." Or ride "for all the marbles."

    3. You gotta know when to rest, and know how to rest as hard as you can, not aimlessly ride around sick or tired.

    4. You gotta do all these things in some sort of golden balance that doesn't destroy your life, your relationships or yourself.

    And you have to do all these things while eating right, cleaning and checking your bike and equipment and giving praise to god or some deity of your choosing and not *****ing and moaning about why you can't ride back-to-back double centuries without "feeling it."
    Dick, I'm not crazy about most of your posts but I have to say this is some of the best training advice I've seen anywhere.
    "You can buy status, but sucking is immutable. After a certain point, upgrading only makes you suck more ostentatiously."
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  7. #7
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
    Neither of those statements represent fundamental approaches to actual training methods.

    When you are riding at distances that require hours and hours of effort, you cannot differentiate training benefits as a result of lengthening a single ride or pair of rides. In other words, if those are your only two training perspectives, it makes no difference which you choose.

    Look, you already possess a great level of fitness. You already have a rich base of long distance experience.

    The best advice is to take what you have learned and understand what training costs are associated with becoming fit for two days of extended riding. It may be that your short comings having to do with pacing, nutrition, break/rest time management are bigger factors that your physical qualities with respect to recovering for multiple-day rides.

    A look at your training log, and a deeper look inside yourself will determine whether it is your body or your mind that could limit big-time miles.

    Although others often tout training "plans" or specific strategies - I've come to appreciate the idea of offering the "theory" of sound advice and letting readers solve their own problems.

    1. You gotta use a log, and know where you are to know where you are going.

    2. You gotta ride as hard as you can some of time - ride like you "stole it." Or ride "for all the marbles."

    3. You gotta know when to rest, and know how to rest as hard as you can, not aimlessly ride around sick or tired.

    4. You gotta do all these things in some sort of golden balance that doesn't destroy your life, your relationships or yourself.

    And you have to do all these things while eating right, cleaning and checking your bike and equipment and giving praise to god or some deity of your choosing and not *****ing and moaning about why you can't ride back-to-back double centuries without "feeling it."
    +1
    Advice I need to heed.

    Thanks RC.

  8. #8
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gorshkov View Post
    ...I teach high school, so the amount of time I have to train will dramatically decrease come August, and if anyone here has any suggestions for using short rides to train for very long rides, I would appreciate it.
    On the time factor, commuting can be a good solution if it works for you. Presumably, you can clean up and store your gear at the school. In addition to time, you can save a little extra cash for bike stuff.

    +1 the people saying speed is good distance training. My training miles were fewer but faster this year, and brevets were faster and easier as a result.
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