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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 07-08-11, 01:18 PM   #1
BadKarma62
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Whats in your wallet..er on your bike?

I'm just starting out on a fitness program because I'm a relatively new diabetic. My plan is a 1/2 Century by the end of the year and a Tour de Cure next summer.

Just curious, what do you pack along on a supported Century?

And on an unsupported Century?

I'm also going to try out a Rails-to-Trails ride next summer also.

Thanks all,

Karma

Last edited by BadKarma62; 07-08-11 at 05:48 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-08-11, 02:10 PM   #2
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Welcome to the club, Karma!

I'm a Type 1 diabetic myself... so I understand your confusion. Especially since you're new to the world of the "metabolically challenged".

My recommendations:
  • Find a doctor who understands and supports your exercise. I've had friends who had doctors actually tell them to take it easier! (my endocrinologist is a triathelete who finished 3rd in his age group at the Hawaii Ironman a few years ago)
  • Buy a RoadID bracelet and use it. Always.
  • Never ever go out for a ride unprepared. Your glucose can tank quickly, so carry gels, glucose tabs, or other emergency sugar sources.
  • Monitor your sugar every 30 minutes minimum while you're out on the road. I use a constant glucose monitor that automatically checks my sugar every 5 to 7 minutes and graphs it for me.
  • Never let anyone tell you to stop riding. It will make your diabetes easier to control, and you will just plain feel better.
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Old 07-08-11, 06:31 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Hydrated View Post
Welcome to the club, Karma!

I'm a Type 1 diabetic myself... so I understand your confusion. Especially since you're new to the world of the "metabolically challenged".

My recommendations:
  • Find a doctor who understands and supports your exercise. I've had friends who had doctors actually tell them to take it easier! (my endocrinologist is a triathelete who finished 3rd in his age group at the Hawaii Ironman a few years ago)
  • Buy a RoadID bracelet and use it. Always.
  • Never ever go out for a ride unprepared. Your glucose can tank quickly, so carry gels, glucose tabs, or other emergency sugar sources.
  • Monitor your sugar every 30 minutes minimum while you're out on the road. I use a constant glucose monitor that automatically checks my sugar every 5 to 7 minutes and graphs it for me.
  • Never let anyone tell you to stop riding. It will make your diabetes easier to control, and you will just plain feel better.
Thanks for the advice. Just ordered my Road ID, should have done that long ago. Everything else is a work in progress. Joining a bike club soon, hoping for a kindred spirit to ride with.

I was just curious what everyone carries on the bike.
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Old 07-08-11, 10:30 PM   #4
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Caveat: I'm not diabetic; my diet issues are not your diet issues.

On an unsupported century, I plan or check my route to find convenience stores along the way. Then I carry enough food to last me an hour longer than I'd expect to take between the longest leg. I take the same amount of water/hydration/electrolyte replacement (i.e. enough to last me longer than the longest leg).

I don't do much different on a supported ride. I just take advantage of what they offer at the rest stops instead of creating my own at a c-store.

My repair kit: spare tube, patch kit, tire levers, pump, bike multi-tool, 2 nitrile gloves, spare batteries (for headlight/taillight), a handful of zip-ties, 2 cheap shower caps (rain protection: one for head, one for leather saddle), small container of chamois cream, small swiss army knife.

I always carry a cell phone; on a long ride, I'll leave it turned off to conserve it's battery. You never know when you're going to have a mechanical failure that you can't fix.
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Old 07-08-11, 10:36 PM   #5
Mr. Beanz
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A supported century, 2 water bottles and a Clifbar

Unsupported century, 2 water bottles, A Clifbar and $5 for a Quarter Pounder with Cheese at McD's.

I always carry 2 spare tubes, frame pump and a coupe of allen wrenches.
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Old 07-08-11, 10:49 PM   #6
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+1 for carrying extra cash in addition to food on long rides. You never know when you'll need extra fluids or food out on a ride. And in a pinch you can use a bill as a tire boot if needed.
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