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  1. #1
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    ideal components for a road bike

    HI I am new here and I am pretty sure this has been answered but if not can someone please help me out. I want to start getting into cycling and I have no Idea what bike I should get to train for events such as a triathalon or a century. I have heard of shimano 105 and tiagra, sora etc. but I have no idea what components would be the best for what I would like to do which fast paced long distance rides
    .basically my question is what kind of parts, components should I be looking for and I am on a budget of $1,000 and under any help such as a cycling site that sells bike or some advice would be very helpful for now I am going to go use google to do some additional research Thank you.

  2. #2
    Senior Member snowdog650's Avatar
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    In that price range, I would definitely go for a used bike. Maybe 5 years old or so, in tip-top shape. For $1000, you can easily find a very solid bike with a full Shimano Ultegra group set (which is their second-best set).

    It is also a good idea to get a basic measurement from a friendly bike shop, so you know what size frame to look for.

  3. #3
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    Thank you, so what you are saying is ultegra shimano is really good part and that I should look for a used bike not new?

  4. #4
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    most of the bike shops around here have big sales to clear out last season's inventory. I got a great bike for about 30% of the ticket cost. Bit it doesn't matter what the cost of the bike is -you're wasting your money if it doesn't meet your needs. The bigger issue for you to answer is finding the right bike that fits how you plan to ride. To do that you need to educate yourself by trying out a lot of differnt options. Getting advice from others isn't a substitution for you doing the workk yourself. All shops will allow you to test ride a bike- take advantage of that to understand what might be important to you. A subtle differernce in dimension can make a big difference in performance and comfort. If you live in a mountainous area vs a flat area, use the folks at the bike shop to help you understand what features best match the kind of riding you're going to do. If you are considering long distance cycling the materials that are used in the frame and fork are worth taking time to investigate- aluminum, steel, carbon, titanium.... all have a different feel. I have an aluminum frame bike that I use for commuting. I used it once on a century and swore to NEVER use the bike again for that purpose (OUCH!!).

    Likewise the choice of components will also depend on the kind of riding you're doing. But I wouldn't worry about the specifics (about componens) to start- you will dial in what works for you the more you ride. View components as a temporary arrangement on your bike- so just start w/ a basic system. They have to be replaced after they wear out and you can upgrade later.

    If cost is a major concern for you, remember that the off- the shelf cost is only the beginning. I've been quite shocked to discover how costly it has been to maintain my bike so I can pursue long-distance cycling. I go through a chain a month, and replace crank and cog set annually...never mind tubes, tires etc... I spend more on the upkeep of my bike than I do on my car on an annual basis. I don't use higher end components because they dont provide any advantages for the kind of riding I do- in fact high end componens seem to lack durability so they are a waste of money. Don't get hung up on one group of shimano being "better" than another. Technology has evolved and the current 105s are virually the same as ultegras were 2 yrs ago.

    good luck
    Last edited by Sekhem; 07-16-11 at 08:28 PM.

  5. #5
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    If on a budget, 27 speed Shimano Tiagra with a triple crankset is your best value. Sram Apex is another good value to look for.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosin789 View Post
    HI I am new here and I am pretty sure this has been answered but if not can someone please help me out. I want to start getting into cycling and I have no Idea what bike I should get to train for events such as a triathalon or a century. I have heard of shimano 105 and tiagra, sora etc. but I have no idea what components would be the best for what I would like to do which fast paced long distance rides
    .basically my question is what kind of parts, components should I be looking for and I am on a budget of $1,000 and under any help such as a cycling site that sells bike or some advice would be very helpful for now I am going to go use google to do some additional research Thank you.
    Generally an entry level road bike is around 700 USD. But even though this is a nice bike for recreational riding you will quickly want an upgrade if you are doing any racing, triathlon or serious recreational riding. If you can stretch your budget up to about 1200 USD you can get a bike that's good enough for racing and has a nice enough frame that it is worth upgrading with better components such as better wheels. Shimano 105 is kind of the point where components start to get more into the nicer quality. Yet Tiagra and Sora components can be used.

    I would look at a Specialized Allez Elite for an entry level racing bike. Other manufacturers will also make a bike in the same price range. But Specialized and Giant generally offer the most for the money in this price range since they are big huge companies. You might also look at Jamis.

    Knowing what I know now I would build my own bike if I was in your situation using a Leader frame and front fork and Neuvation wheels and a Shimano Ultegra crankset. Shimano 105 shifters and derailers and a Nashbar steel cassette to save some money. Leader makes a couple of different TT frames which is what you want for Triathlon.

    EDIT: Looks like Leader has changed their product line. They are getting into more fixed gear, single speed and track stuff. They still make 1 steel frame road bike frame. They used to make a dedicated Tri frame in aluminum that was pretty nice and a higher end TT frame. Still, there are good road racing frame deals at Nashbar and on the internet.
    Last edited by Hezz; 07-17-11 at 11:06 AM.

  7. #7
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    Most brand name, (Shimano, SRAM, etc.) components will shift and brake adequately for most riding. So, I would not get too hung up on level of component groups at this point. What I would recommend is trying to get the lightest bike that fits first and foremost. Fit is important. If you are not comfortable you won't ride much. Secondly, I would recommend a compact crank with a cassette that has an adequate gear range such as a 10 speed 12-27 or 11-28 so you will have a low enough gear for climbing. If you have to go with a heavier bike you might even consider a triple chained crank with an 11-32 cassette for even lower gearing options. Either way you will have enough high end gears to roll you down the road on the flats at a good pace and enough low ones to climb like a mountain goat when you need to. It has been my experience that the lighter bike will climb easier and accelerate quicker but you won't notice much difference in cruising speed or top end speed. My 31 pound hybrid is just as fast as my 20 pound road bike in the flats and going down hills. It is harder to get up to speed and does not coast as well and it tends to tire me out on longer rides and I find I cannot maintain the pace on the hybrid that I can on the roadie so my rides are usually longer too for the same distances. As for websites where you can buy a good bike, there are many to be found. I have personal experience with one and that is fezzari.com. I recently bought a road bike from them and had a great experience and got a great bike too. They will fit the bike to your measurements and it will be ride ready when you get it. That being said if you haven't ever bought a bike you owe it to yourself to visit a local bike shop that sells quality bikes and test some out and see what works best for you. Then, you can make the decision to buy online or to buy local. You will probably pay more local than you will online but it may be worth it if you are just getting started because of the expert support that you should get from the LBS. Congrats on getting into cycling. I have been at it for about 4 years now and am on my 3rd bike beginning with a bike I bought at Target, then a Trek 7300 from an LBS and now a Fezzari Fore' CR2. If you fall in love with cycling as much as I have you will probably be doing the same thing over the next few years so don't approach this as your end all, be all bike. Odds are it won't be. Just get something you can enjoy and grow on. A good friend of mine started competing in tri's a couple of years ago and regularly wins his age group riding a used Specialized Allez. Good luck in your quest and Happy Trails!
    Last edited by phodges0921; 07-18-11 at 03:35 PM.

  8. #8
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    IMO, I would find a used bike that you have reason to believe will fit you well (this is where some research and help from the LBS will help). You can probably get one for a couple hundred bucks. Put a little money into and go out and ride it. You will find out things about it that you like and don't like but you won't have invested much money in it. When you feel more confident about what your tastes are, then you will be better able to find a new bikes that fit what you want. Your chances of being happy with the new bike will be much higher because you will be able to say "I know I like that and I know I don't like this".

  9. #9
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    Most of the stuff out there is pretty good. As has been pointed out, even the relatively low-end stuff is as good as the middle-of-the-road parts of a few years (let alone decades) ago. Considering that there's a fellow out in Washington state who has been setting randonneuring course records on a bike made in the 40s, it seems obvious that the rider truly is more important than the bike.

  10. #10
    No one carries the DogBoy
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    I may be a cycling redneck, but here's my $.02. I've ridden bikes with Dura-Ace, and I've ridden bikes with Sora, XTR and Alivio, I've ridden bikes with Record and Veloce(sp?). The difference can be noticed but it is not (IMO) worth the difference in cost. Also, I am a fat pig so the weight difference for me is laughable. Every drivetrain I've had that didn't come on an x-mart bike has been reliable, easy to shift and comfortable to ride. For my taste, forget the "level" and find the levers that feel the best in your hands and the gear range that fits your riding terrain. Beyond that, the differences in performance are small (IMO) but the differences in price are large.

  11. #11
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    Thank you for all your posts, I will take all your advice to help me in deciding which bike is best for me and I will go to the bike shop to ride the bikes first to see how they feel.

  12. #12
    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhem View Post
    most of the bike shops around here have big sales to clear out last season's inventory. I got a great bike for about 30% of the ticket cost. Bit it doesn't matter what the cost of the bike is -you're wasting your money if it doesn't meet your needs. The bigger issue for you to answer is finding the right bike that fits how you plan to ride. To do that you need to educate yourself by trying out a lot of differnt options. Getting advice from others isn't a substitution for you doing the workk yourself. All shops will allow you to test ride a bike- take advantage of that to understand what might be important to you. A subtle differernce in dimension can make a big difference in performance and comfort. If you live in a mountainous area vs a flat area, use the folks at the bike shop to help you understand what features best match the kind of riding you're going to do. If you are considering long distance cycling the materials that are used in the frame and fork are worth taking time to investigate- aluminum, steel, carbon, titanium.... all have a different feel. I have an aluminum frame bike that I use for commuting. I used it once on a century and swore to NEVER use the bike again for that purpose (OUCH!!).

    Likewise the choice of components will also depend on the kind of riding you're doing. But I wouldn't worry about the specifics (about componens) to start- you will dial in what works for you the more you ride. View components as a temporary arrangement on your bike- so just start w/ a basic system. They have to be replaced after they wear out and you can upgrade later.

    If cost is a major concern for you, remember that the off- the shelf cost is only the beginning. I've been quite shocked to discover how costly it has been to maintain my bike so I can pursue long-distance cycling. I go through a chain a month, and replace crank and cog set annually...never mind tubes, tires etc... I spend more on the upkeep of my bike than I do on my car on an annual basis. I don't use higher end components because they dont provide any advantages for the kind of riding I do- in fact high end componens seem to lack durability so they are a waste of money. Don't get hung up on one group of shimano being "better" than another. Technology has evolved and the current 105s are virually the same as ultegras were 2 yrs ago.

    good luck
    Do you mean you much prefer a steel frame for longer distances because it doesn't transmit as much vibration as an aluminium frame?

    And would you feel comfortable buying anything lower than Deore/Tiagra? Would you roll around with Alivio/Sora parts?

  13. #13
    Papaya King waynesworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogBoy View Post
    I may be a cycling redneck, but here's my $.02. I've ridden bikes with Dura-Ace, and I've ridden bikes with Sora, XTR and Alivio, I've ridden bikes with Record and Veloce(sp?). The difference can be noticed but it is not (IMO) worth the difference in cost. Also, I am a fat pig so the weight difference for me is laughable. Every drivetrain I've had that didn't come on an x-mart bike has been reliable, easy to shift and comfortable to ride. For my taste, forget the "level" and find the levers that feel the best in your hands and the gear range that fits your riding terrain. Beyond that, the differences in performance are small (IMO) but the differences in price are large.
    I believe this is true. The 105 bike I had shifted more crisply than the Sora bikes I've ridden. The Tiagra bike I now own shifts pretty close to how the 105 bike that was 5 years older shifted at the time, if memory serves. But, they all shifted, and worked just fine.

    If you have an active Craigslist in your area, you can probably find something reasonable if you're patient. However, you should easily be able to find something new that is within your budget. If you can stretch it a couple hundred bucks, though, that opens up lots of possibilities.

    Right now you may be able to find 2011 closeouts. That might allow you to afford more bike than you otherwise could.
    Quote Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
    walk right in and punch the first guy you meet in the head
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  14. #14
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Here is a new bike with 5700 105 series 2x10. The frame is ideal for longer rides and accepts 700x35 tires and fenders: http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...LAID=930224204

    FRAME: Chromoly
    FORK: Carbon legs with chromoly steerer for integrated style 45mm headset, 1 1/8" steerer
    HEADSET: Tange sealed cartridge bearing, integrated
    CRANKSET: FSA Gossamer, 170mm (49, 52cm); 172.5mm (54, 56cm); 175mm (58, 61cm)
    BOTTOM BRACKET: FSA Mega EXO
    SHIFTERS: Shimano 105 5700 10-speed
    LEVERS: Shimano 105 5700
    HANDLEBAR: Kalloy 31.8mm oversized clamp, Width: 400mm (49, 52cm); 420mm (54, 56cm); 440mm (58, 61cm)
    STEM: Kalloy, 7-degree rise, Length: 90mm (49, 52cm); 100mm (54, 56cm); 110mm (58, 61cm)
    FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano 105 5700 10-speed double
    REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano 105 5700 10-speed SS
    CASSETTE: Shimano 105 5700 (12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25T)
    BRAKES: Tektro Oryx cantilever
    WHEELSET: Alex DC19 32-spoke
    TIRES: Kenda K-879 700x30

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