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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 07-24-11, 04:30 PM   #1
jrkotrla
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First really long ride

Signed up like a fool for the Tejas 500. Not asking for advise on how to train, as it's way to late for something with as much foresight as that at any rate , but on what to eat/drink on the ride.

Talked to the organizer and he suggested staying on the bike and going slower as a much better strategy for finishing within the 48hr time limit than doing quick sprints around the 26mile course and resting between. Given this, I'll be spinning on the bike continuously for however long it takes me to finish and/or fall asleep and crash (with necessary stops to switch bikes/tires/bio).

For those of you who have done these things, what do you use for fuel?
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Old 07-24-11, 08:54 PM   #2
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Can't say for the 48-hour. On longer rando rides, usually whatever sounds good, and after I've been riding a long time, that winds up including barbecue sandwiches, pimento cheese sandwiches and stuff like that. And some Perpetuum along the way. Last year's winner has recently been talking about Cytomax, but I haven't used it myself. I've been drinking mainly water and Gatorade, with the occasional V8 thrown in, and sometimes I take Endurolytes and sometimes I don't. I haven't experimented extensively enough to confirm, but I suspect Perpetuum may clog the pipes if used to excess, no fiber.

On the 12-hour race last year, I was moving pretty good the first 4 laps, then it got hard after that. So i suspect the spinning/mashing/fast/slow whatever will all work itself out for you after a few laps, also. You get into whatever-you-can=manage mode. Or I do, at least.

Last year, it wasn't too hot, but the year before, it was pretty warm during the last afternoon of the race- so your drink needs could vary considerably depending on the weather at the time.

You might try posting on the LSR board also- I suspect two or three of the other riders would get back with you on it.
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Old 08-14-11, 06:11 PM   #3
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On my first and only century ride I decided to stop for pizza. Big Mistake! Since then I've learned some valuable lessons.

In the morning, take oatmeal or steel cut oats. Anything that contains complex carbohydrates. These will keep you charged for the start. Then, you want to eat at least every 20 miles or so. Gatorade cut with water will limit your sugar crash later and keep you hydrated throughout the event. I try to go natural with bananas and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Energy bars can get dicey as they take energy for your body to digest. If at all, eat these early on.
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Old 08-22-11, 12:12 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by jrkotrla View Post
Signed up like a fool for the Tejas 500. Not asking for advise on how to train, as it's way to late for something with as much foresight as that at any rate , but on what to eat/drink on the ride.

Talked to the organizer and he suggested staying on the bike and going slower as a much better strategy for finishing within the 48hr time limit than doing quick sprints around the 26mile course and resting between. Given this, I'll be spinning on the bike continuously for however long it takes me to finish and/or fall asleep and crash (with necessary stops to switch bikes/tires/bio).

For those of you who have done these things, what do you use for fuel?
I have never done such a ride/race but I can tell you that for me real food is important. Since this race is done on a circuit I assume they will have a feed area where you can store a cooler of food. I would take a big cooler full of ice and cans of V8. Small sandwiches made with wheat bread, small amount of protein and lots of raw veggies on them. Make them about the size so you can eat one small one each lap. I would also take some electrolyte drops to add to my water instead of Gatorade. The best thing you could do would be to make a small protein shake every two laps out of raw milk and some high quality whey protein. One world whey protein is far and above the best but it is really expensive. It would be worth it for this race though. So you could stop for about 1 minute each lap and grab a sandwich and V8 to eat on the bike. Then stop for about 4-5 minutes every other lap and make a small whey protein shake. You can also throw a few apples and bananas in the cooler to take on the bike to eat while riding. After about 4-5 hours you may get a raging appetite since you are really starting to burn a lot of calories.

Good luck.

Last edited by Hezz; 08-22-11 at 12:20 AM.
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Old 08-23-11, 08:04 AM   #5
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I would take a big cooler full of ice and cans of V8. Small sandwiches made with wheat bread, small amount of protein and lots of raw veggies on them. Make them about the size so you can eat one small one each lap. I would also take some electrolyte drops to add to my water instead of Gatorade.

Good luck.
It's interesting to see the range of fuel requirements for different LD cyclists. If I tried yours I'd probably have a major case of heartburn, a stomach ache, a reduction in power output, and bonk not long after 100-200 miles.
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Old 08-23-11, 11:04 PM   #6
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It's interesting to see the range of fuel requirements for different LD cyclists. If I tried yours I'd probably have a major case of heartburn, a stomach ache, a reduction in power output, and bonk not long after 100-200 miles.
Yes, it's very true that different people need different things on the bike for long rides. Some people get along better with energy gels and energy bars and endurance drink formula and need less food. I'm thinking that the younger you are the easier it is to handle these concentrated processed foods but they can catch up with you when you get older. Also, younger riders can handle more sugar because they can metabolize it better. And because trained younger riders are likely to be riding at higher wattages they may need more easy to digest quick energy solutions.

One thing that triathlon ironmen do is take little maltodextrin wafers which the body can more easily digest and convert into glucose. I don't know if they make these things or buy them. I think that these things have been replaced largely with energy gels packets now. And the triathletes seem to think that it is generally better to have one that is made with several different kinds of sugars. But as general rule Fructose should be avoided because it is slow to digest and interferes with liver and kidney functions. Some people are more sensitive to it but it is best avoided.

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Old 08-24-11, 07:20 PM   #7
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For those of you who have done these things, what do you use for fuel?
First off, if you don't already know what works for you on longer rides, there's no way you're prepared for a 500 mile race. That said, what works for me is (1) Gatorade and (1)Ensure every hour with occasional small amounts of solid food at stops.
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