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  1. #1
    squatchy
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    Show me your best, extra large saddle bag pics or links.

    Hi

    I tend to switch bags depending on distance and weather. I need a bigger bag to be able to put extra clothes as I am doing a big 3 day climb with lots of weather and tons of climbing early next spring. It is supported but the elevation changes, along with early spring makes me believe I'll need to be able to have a good array of things on board. I don't want a rack, so panniers are out. I might conside a handle bar bag, but would really like to see what you people have for larger seat bags.

    Thanks

    Ryan

  2. #2
    rhm
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    multimodal commuter rhm's Avatar
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    I made this one myself, copying the design from an ancient bag I bought that turned out to be at the end of its useful life. It's leather with a waterproof coating of some kind, not a very attractive material but it is waterproof. And the bag carries a lot of stuff.


    Speaking of saddle bags, has anyone ever heard that a saddle bag can cause or contribute to fork shimmy? I heard that somewhere, and am not sure I believe it or not. This bag of mine is totally secure, with u-shaped bolts around the seat rails, and it rests on a Park Tools bag rest that cantilevers back from the seat stays. It does not flop around at all. But I can't deny that the fork shimmies if I let go of the bars for more than a few seconds. The shimmy stops if I lean forward. So more weight on the front wheel, less on the back, might be a better setup.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chris Pringle's Avatar
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    Ryan: The largest saddlebags I've seen are made by Rivendell or Carradice. On the larger models, they recommend some kind of support, like a small rack or a "Bagman" saddlebag support. Otherwise, you start having the bag swing around all over making it more difficult to handle the bike. Such support also avoids the saddlebag brushing the rear of your thighs as you pedal which can get quite annoying. If you want to avoid installing racks on your bike, look into frame bags such as the ones made by Revelate Designs. For a bunch of ideas, look into the immensely popular "Ultralight Evangelism" thread in the Touring forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by rhm View Post
    Speaking of saddle bags, has anyone ever heard that a saddle bag can cause or contribute to fork shimmy? I heard that somewhere, and am not sure I believe it or not. This bag of mine is totally secure, with u-shaped bolts around the seat rails, and it rests on a Park Tools bag rest that cantilevers back from the seat stays. It does not flop around at all. But I can't deny that the fork shimmies if I let go of the bars for more than a few seconds. The shimmy stops if I lean forward. So more weight on the front wheel, less on the back, might be a better setup.
    Yes, I've heard of saddlebags causing shimmy. Apparently, the rear of the bike gets too heavy and the front end gets too light. It also depends a lot on the design of the frame and fork as not all bikes are prone to this. Since a lot of the rider weight is already on the rear, as a rule of thumb, it is best to counter the overall weight by carrying some bags/panniers (or at least a handlebar bag) up front. It is my understanding that the bike generally will perform better - definitely it will feel more grounded.
    Last edited by Chris Pringle; 11-08-12 at 07:02 PM.

  4. #4
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    I don't use one (use rack bags, etc.) Several of the local rando riders use Carradice bags. I'm not sure, but the Nelson looks like one of the models- I recognize the "face" on it!
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  5. #5
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  6. #6
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    I use a Topeak Dynapack. The smaller version (which I use) is 4 liters. Works well for long distances, but not quite enough space for spare clothing. The larger version, pictured below, has a capacity of 9.7 liters:




    The attachment system works very well, and you can get extra "fixers" to easily swap the bag onto other bicycles.

  7. #7
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Look up Carradice Nelson Longflap.

  8. #8
    Has opinion, will express
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe View Post
    I use a Topeak Dynapack. The smaller version (which I use) is 4 liters. Works well for long distances, but not quite enough space for spare clothing. The larger version, pictured below, has a capacity of 9.7 liters:




    The attachment system works very well, and you can get extra "fixers" to easily swap the bag onto other bicycles.
    I have one of those. However, because I like bikes with an old-style flat top tube, the space on the seat post for the clamp was rather limited. Fortunately, there is enough space on the seat tube above the junction with the seat stays to put the clamp. it works like a charm.

    This is on a carbon fibre bike, but before proceeding with the fitting, I did confirm that the bike, an older Merlin C110 Works, had an aluminium sleeve inside the seat tube.

    I like the bag. The whole design reduces complications that come with racks, and the back is expandable to enable more stuff to go inside depending on the season. The only trouble is that the loops on the back of my Brooks Swallow do tend to wear spots on the lid of the pack when I open it.

    A rear mudguard also is advisable. I can't recall having used it in really heavy rain, but slipping a plastic bag over it is not a problem, which I have done. The mounting system makes that so easy.

    I would recommend it. But then I would also recommend a Carradice Barley for short rides with not much stuff, and a Carradice Longflap when the range increases and the weather is uncertain. And the Topeak slide-on rack bags have all been of use in one iteration or another in my riding history.

    In short, I love experimenting with bags...
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    Richard's Trail West by BC Randonneurs Photo Gallery, on Flickr
    Er, not the best photo but it's the only one of that bag I have...

    It's a Carradice Nelson Longflap. Worked great, but handlebar bags are just far superior.

  10. #10
    Randomhead
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    Nice picture

    I know a lot more people that use the Carradice than handlebar bags. Granted, that's because it's a lot cheaper.

  11. #11
    oldie
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    I use a Minehaha bag, this is the small one. I can get tools, a tube, rain jacket and winter gloves in there with room to spare.
    398197_468882573163965_1012840128_n.jpg

    http://banjobrothers.shptron.com/pro...007060.0.0.0.0
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  12. #12
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    Another reason they recommend a support of some kind for the larger saddlebags is that unless you ride a really tall frame and have lots of space between saddle and rear wheel, the saddlebag can drag on the tire.
    Lots of saddlebags have D-rings on top though, which allow you to strap more stuff on top, where if nothing else it's at least up away from the tire. But at a certain point, you're piling up all kinds of weight on the bag loops, and in a position where it doesn't do you any favors in terms of handling and swaying.

    Personally, I prefer to add a handlebar bag if I need more than I can carry more than in a saddlebag and less than panniers. The bike also feels more balanced to me, having weight both in back and up front, although that could be all in my head.

  13. #13
    Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk znomit's Avatar
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    On saturday I did a 320km ride with my ortlieb seatbag. This is usually my bag of choice for long day rides. Swallows rain jacket, tools, some food, vest, arm and leg warmers. Zip tie a tyre to the top if you need it.
    Its held firmly to the seat so doesn't rock back and fourth like the nelson bags tend to.



    Sunday monday was a 300km CC tour using my revelate pika, probably a bit on the large size for what you want.

  14. #14
    Randomhead
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    I have one of those ortlieb bags. I don't recommend it since it fell off during a 600k. That was a pain. Ortlieb has threatened to replace the hardware for me if I ever give them a chance, but I just put a strap around the bag and seat rails and I would never use it without the strap again anyway. I know another rider that has adopted the strap solution for the same reason. I think the hardware is just under-sized for the large bag.

    Thank goodness for the robustness of Berthoud fenders, I thought for sure the fender was a goner when the bag hit it, but there is no evidence on the fender that it ever happened.

  15. #15
    Old. Slow. Happy. MileHighMark's Avatar
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    Carradice Nelson with Bagman support:

    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  16. #16
    Old. Slow. Happy. MileHighMark's Avatar
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    Dill Pickle Gear saddlebag (large, custom) with Bagman support:

    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  17. #17
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    Revelate: (from a 400k)


    IMG_1592 by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    IMG_9474 by mbeganyi, on Flickr
    Last edited by bmike; 11-27-12 at 02:26 PM.

  18. #18
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    And a frame bag:


    frosty morning by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    combined, with a gas tank, with a bladder, or bottles, etc. you can carry enough gear for touring...

    the 'tangle' bag is a small frame bag. fits a bladder, or lots of other stuff:


    ready to roll, day 2 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  19. #19
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
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    i've also used the nelson, camper, SQR tour, ortlieb in medium and large, and ortlieb handlebar bag.

  20. #20
    Randomhead
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    My LBS had a batch of Revelate bags in, but they went really fast. I was tempted to get the seat bag, but I'm not sure if I would use it on a brevet

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MileHighMark View Post
    Dill Pickle Gear saddlebag (large, custom) with Bagman support:

    Hey, that looks familiar!

  22. #22
    Old. Slow. Happy. MileHighMark's Avatar
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    Just received one of the new Bagman 2 supports from Carradice. Lighter (by approx 70g), and much stiffer than the original version/model.



    It's definitely worth considering if you want to reduce bag sway and leg interference.
    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  23. #23
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Not a saddle bag, but this large Revelate frame bag works for me;

    2014 Trek DS.1: "Viaggiatore" A do-it-all bike that is waiting in Italy
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  24. #24
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    I used a frame bag a little bit when I first started randonneuring. It wasn't really a good solution for me because I prefer a low q-factor crank and pedal with my knees pretty close to the top tube, so when it was full of stuff, my knees would hit it. And when I would climb, my knees would rub against the velcro holding it on so I'd either scuff up my knee warmers or scuff up the inside of my knees. But I can see where, if your legs don't hit it and it doesn't interfere with getting your bottles out, it's probably a pretty optimal place to carry weight, in terms of balance and weight distribution, and easy to reach while riding. I get stuff in and out of the side pockets of my saddlebag all the time while riding, but usually do it sitting up, sometimes with both hands behind my back fiddling around with stuff, so I can see where not everyone would want to do that (even though I'm convinced that it helps me avoid back/neck stiffness and hand issues on long rides too).

  25. #25
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    Carradice Barley. Not as large as the Nelson, but big enough to hold my spare clothes and such. It's the smallest of the traditional Carradice line.



    I also like the Carradice Pendle, which is somewhat larger but still not as big as the Nelson. The Bagman rack is very useful for any decent sized saddlebag.


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