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  1. #26
    Randomhead
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    I think that for Texas weather, the largest Ortlieb seat bag would work pretty well. I would put a strap around it, the mounting isn't the best. I really like the bag though.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Rwc5830's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Thanks, CFB.

    The Moots bag does look very nice, but my idea of "reasonably priced" is a little different.

    Rwc, unfortunately I can`t say I`ve been much in TX other than passing through an airport from time to time and the little chunk of highway between Las Cruces and Juarez. If you end up in Reno again, give me a holler. And couch is up for grabs too (WS members Brian and Lupita in Lemmon Valley).
    Thanks Brian, the same for you, if you're ever in South TX I'm also a WS host!
    Cycling is an addiction that is worth having; let's go!! South TX Randos www.rgvrandos.org

  3. #28
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    This thread inspired me to pick up a Topeak trunk yesterday for my commuter/winter training bike. Did a fine job of carrying my lunch today, and no more sweaty back for me.

  4. #29
    Senior Member LucF's Avatar
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    I use a combination frame bag (for food and papers) + seat bag (tools, clothing + first aid). Can't put much in a framebag. With randonneuring-size seatbags, the problem is usually the support system -- which btw should not be used on carbon seat posts.

    My seat bag is a Vaude (http://www.vaude.com/en-GB/en/Produc...oad-Bag-M.html). Works great for me, but if I was getting one today I'd get the Arkel Randonneur Rack+Tail Rider. More expensive but much sturdier rack than either Vaude or Topeak systems.

    My setup :
    Cervélo R3 Vaude 005.jpg

  5. #30
    Senior Member antimonysarah's Avatar
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    I am really liking this map case:
    http://www.rei.com/product/637969/bar-map-otg

    It folds fairly small, so I don't feel like my handlebars are a giant sail, but shows enough of a turn-by-turn list to be useful. As for seat bags, I was in here looking for ideas; mine is only big enough to hold my emergency kit; something that can hold a jacket would be nice.

  6. #31
    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
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  7. #32
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    Well, I now have a few weeks with my Topeak seatpost/trunk bag. I like it for commuting a lot, holds lots of stuff, was reasonably cheap, and comes off easily. That last is important, because it has a dramatic effect on the bike's handling! I can not understand how you guys can tolerate it on long rando rides. To me, as soon as I take it off it's like riding a new bike...a much better one!

    Seems like every time I build another bike, or into another configuration, I become more and more convinced that a low-trail, front loaded bike is the only solution for performance cycling with a load.

  8. #33
    Reeks of aged cotton duck Hydrated's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
    Seems like every time I build another bike, or into another configuration, I become more and more convinced that a low-trail, front loaded bike is the only solution for performance cycling with a load of bananna bread on board.
    FIFY...

    I've become a big fan of balanced loading rather than just "up front" or "out back" loading. I learned that from riding my '84 Trek 520 touring bike. If you load that thing up with a heavy load isolated on the back, the frame wiggles a lot and the tail wags the dog pretty badly. If you load it all up front on a big honkin' rack, the steering goes to pot and shimmy gets ugly on downhills to the point that it's moderately scary. But if I split the load up to put moderate loads on both front and back, the handling is stable and predictable and that long touring frame does its job soaking up bumps.

    I carried that premise over to my distance bikes too. My Kogswell P/R is a low trail 650B design, but I don't load it all up front. I split the load between a moderately sized Carradice saddle bag (I think it's the Barley model) and an Arkel bar bag. I get confidence inspiring handling and spirited performance with the bike loaded that way.

    That loading strategy works well on my Serotta too... and it's a full on race geometry. I just avoid loading too much heavy stuff in the bar bag.
    "We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." George Orwell

  9. #34
    or tarckeemoon, depending marqueemoon's Avatar
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    I would go with a Revelate bag with a cue sheet holder. Jersey pockets are fine for holding arm warmers, food, whatever, but as has been mentioned already a Bento Box type deal might be helpful.

    I am not a Carradice fan.

  10. #35
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    OTOH I've never experienced the slightest handling problem from my Trek carbon race bike with the Detours rack bag I mentioned earlier in this thread. Don't even know it's there. Never had the slightest shimmy from that bike, even descending bumpy passes at 50 mph. I have a light bar bag on our CoMo tandem and even the slightest weight in it affects handling. I've gotten used to it though, and now put maybe 1-2 pounds in it.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hydrated View Post
    FIFY...

    I've become a big fan of balanced loading rather than just "up front" or "out back" loading. I learned that from riding my '84 Trek 520 touring bike. If you load that thing up with a heavy load isolated on the back, the frame wiggles a lot and the tail wags the dog pretty badly. If you load it all up front on a big honkin' rack, the steering goes to pot and shimmy gets ugly on downhills to the point that it's moderately scary. But if I split the load up to put moderate loads on both front and back, the handling is stable and predictable and that long touring frame does its job soaking up bumps.

    I carried that premise over to my distance bikes too. My Kogswell P/R is a low trail 650B design, but I don't load it all up front. I split the load between a moderately sized Carradice saddle bag (I think it's the Barley model) and an Arkel bar bag. I get confidence inspiring handling and spirited performance with the bike loaded that way.

    That loading strategy works well on my Serotta too... and it's a full on race geometry. I just avoid loading too much heavy stuff in the bar bag.
    Proper nutrition is critical for the endurance athlete...banana bread carries all of your essential nutrients; chocolate, banana, butter, deliciousness...etc.

    Seriously though, if I'm going to go through the trouble of strapping a bag to my bike, I expect to be able to stuff it full and not have to think too much about it. Though your point about balanced loading is a good one, the trouble is that my big fat arse is mostly on the back of the bike so I still think the front is the proper place to put a load in order to achieve that.

  12. #37
    Senior Member k7baixo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmikesell View Post
    these are pretty expensive, but check out revelate designs
    http://www.revelatedesigns.com/
    Great products but he can be slow to ship if he hasn't made what you're purchasing. Order well ahead of your needs.
    Cheers, Gerry
    gerryelam.wordpress.com

  13. #38
    Banned. Bekologist's Avatar
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    non-traditional bags i've found invaluable on long group rides as feed bags and food haulers -


    1) cheap musette bag.
    2)climbers chalkbag strapped to back of saddle.



    Musettes are invaluable as a feedbag. I like using mine on hot days to pick up cans of ice cold coke at a convenience store (that i keep hidden from the other riders), then hand out once we get rolling again.

    Another bag i've used for years strapped to the saddle loops on most of my rides as a gu pack, coke, coffee or banana holder, is a climbers chalk bag.

    It's a goofy look, people make fun of it, but it holds bananas and gu packs and food and drinks like a snacktray. It works particularly well as a trash can for empty gu packs and wrappers - what does everyone else do with them anyway? I figured out to strap a climbers bag to the saddle as a feed bag and trash can.

    Revelate Designs makes a similarly styled bag called 'the feed bag'.


    snakbag2.jpgI think there's some bananas in this photo 520lighttour.jpg ,still in great shape after about 200k of mostly mountainous gravel. (Sun tea brewing in bottlle under downtube)


    ==================================

    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    I think that for Texas weather, the largest Ortlieb seat bag would work pretty well. I would put a strap around it, the mounting isn't the best. I really like the bag though.
    Had the large ortlieb saddlebag for a while when i worked at Gregg's. Loved the bag, hated the attachment. Returned the bag.

    I received a Revelate seatbag over the winter.

    monstercross2.jpg (NOT a brevet bike )

    The large size is huge, the attachments solid straps and neoprene reinforced nylon. We'll see how it holds up, but a much nicer underseat rolltop saddlebag compared to the Ortlieb one. The small Revelate saddlebag is probably also plenty big enough.

    The Revelate saddlebag is almost too huge for a couple hundred miles on a bike; but its going to give me some extra space if needed. A rider could pick up a six-pack AND a rotisserie chicken with one of these, and still have room for the raincoat and whatever else that needs packing.

    -------------------------------------------------

    No one has yet mentioned the SQR system from Carradice?

    Used to see those hanging up all the time at Davidson cycles in Seattle, but the design seemed over-engineered yet a little fragile.

    This spring i sold the Carradice i've used for a few years, didn't like having to throw my leg over it, and the 'rack' -bagman- was always bouncing loose on gravel and rough roads. I'd be out riding in the middle of the Marin highlands of GGNRA and one of the rackrails would work its way loose from the seatclamp. The new 'bagman' design is a mini rack, and a kludge to attach the seat and frame in that manner IMO.

    Loved the look, but good riddance.
    Last edited by Bekologist; 03-10-13 at 05:17 AM.

  14. #39
    Randomhead
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    a plurality of the long distance cyclists I know use a carradice. I never really understood why.

    I will probably get a Revelate seat bag. Not really to replace the Ortleib, but for times when the Ortleib isn't big enough.

    I was considering getting a seatpost rack and trunk bag, but the Revelate makes more sense to me since it needs no rack.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    I've seen a lot of carradice bags too. They are big and bulky but I suppose their popularity is in the fact that they carry a lot.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  16. #41
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    If you like the bike and it's comfortable to sit on for the duration of the brevet and you can finish in the time limit, it's a great brevet bike. No reason it has to be a brevet-specific bike.
    However, you'll probably have better handling if you don't put too terribly much weight on the handlebars, since your bike isn't designed for a front load. Personally, I like to have a compact handlebar bag for food (and cuesheet) and a saddlebag for the other stuff. It also has the benefit of keeping my clean extra clothing separate from the mess I usually make in my handlebar bag by the end of a long ride...

    If you try a frame bag and the straps aren't long enough, you can usually find other pieces of velcro or webbing that you can extend them with. In particular, electronics stores sometiimes have velcro straps with a plastic loop at one end that work great for tie-downs, strapping on pumps, extending other straps, etc. They sell them for tying up cables among other things. Hardware stores sometimes have them too.

    And of course I second Cyril's suggestion of Dill Pickle...

  17. #42
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    I've been using this saddle bag from Banjo Brothers. Well made and holds a reasonable load without adversely affecting the bike's handling.

    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  18. #43
    Lurking Under a Rock
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    re: CO2. I'd recommend a manual pump. If you carry 2 cartridges, what do you do if you have 3 flats? not common, but not unheard of.

    I loved my ortlieb handlebar bag. I'd get my food at the control, throw it in the bag and keep pedaling. who cares if you slow down to eat? 12 mph is better than 0 mph. I could also shed layers while riding.

  19. #44
    24-Speed Machine Chris516's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rwc5830 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I did my first 200K last year and plan another on my bike next month. In April I plan to tackle a 300K and am now concerned about being able to carry more while on the bike.

    My bike is a Specialized Roubaix SL3 Pro (yes I know it may not be a good rando or touring bike because it is a road bike). I do centuries all the time but an unsupported 300K has me a bit concerned that I'm not carrying enough.

    I currently have a small seat bag that carries two CO2, a tube and a small toolkit. When I ride I also carry an extra tube, tire levels, my wallet, phone and snacks in my cycling jersey pockets.

    I've done a little research and have seen some handlebar bags. Another alternative are some lightweight racks that you can put a seperate bag on. The rack attaches to the seat/seat posts. For example: Arkel brand

    For my 300K I'd like to be able to carry a little more stuff like a couple more CO2, maybe another tube, my jacket (which can be rolled up very small) and some extra snacks.

    So will one of those rack/bag combos on the seat be too heavy for my bike? To me, that looks like a good option as long as I don't pile a bunch of heavy stuff in it. The handlbar bags look a bit bulky to me...don't know.

    Or should I just get a larger seat bag?

    Ideas are welcome, but don't rag on me for doing a 300K rando on a road bike One of these days my N+1 will be more of a touring bike but for now this is working.

    Pictures would be good if you have a setup to suggest.

    Thanks everyone,
    Richard
    Richard, Here is the link to a hip pack I have: http://www.hudsontrail.com/viewItem/...715/1/t/34063/ It has the bottle holders on each side of it. I have a pair of cycling gloves, tube, tire puller, flat repair kit, cell phone, I.D., and emergency #'s, in it. I also have my PDA to take down any notes on my rides, that I can hotsync with my computer.

    As for your doing a 300k on road bike, I don't see anything wrong with that. I do every kind of riding, with my '03 Specialized Allez'.
    Last edited by Chris516; 03-15-13 at 11:25 PM.

  20. #45
    Randomhead
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    Ortlieb has a new seat post bag, probably because the mounting on the seat bag was so bad. I saw one yesterday at my lbs. One nice feature is a strap on the top to carry extra clothing. If they had gotten a large I probably would have bought it, but the medium was a pretty decent size

  21. #46
    Senior Member
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    Carradice SQR tour. Carry up to 22 lbs. (Length 37cm, Width 18cm, Depth 20cm) I use it on my road bike when I commute. I can put quite a lot of stuff in their (mostly clothes - rain gear... not heavy, but they can take up space.) I throw my extra tube, Co2, patch kit tire levers in their already in a separate saddle bag. I also have a Lezyne micro floor drive pump that fits in their just fine:



    My road bike is a cannondale synapse carbon fiber... I think it's the bike I would ride on anything up to 400K.
    Last edited by InTheRain; 03-20-13 at 02:59 PM.

  22. #47
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    You guys will also want to be careful in putting to much weight on a carbon seatpost. . .
    Breaking that ends a ride really fast.

    Small Handlebar bag - http://topeak.com/products/Handlebar%20Bags
    Tri Feed Bag - http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftr...ags/vital-pack
    Mountain Feed Bag - https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...2&ProductID=12

    Now you have a lot of stuff up front with no need to stop to access!

  23. #48
    Senior Member Chesha Neko's Avatar
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    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...=1&ProductID=5

    Revelate for frame bags and Carradice for saddlebags.

    Quote Originally Posted by rusheleven View Post
    You guys will also want to be careful in putting to much weight on a carbon seatpost. . .
    Breaking that ends a ride really fast.
    Switch to Thompson Elite for load carrying on the brevet.
    "I stick to my basic plan of simply keeping the pedals turning."
    -- Kent Peterson, The Way of the Mountain Turtle

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rwc5830 View Post
    My bike is a Specialized Roubaix SL3 Pro (yes I know it may not be a good rando or touring bike because it is a road bike). I do centuries all the time but an unsupported 300K has me a bit concerned that I'm not carrying enough.
    It would be a poor touring bike but there's no reason it isn't just fine for rando (especially for a short 300k).

    Quote Originally Posted by Rwc5830 View Post
    I've done a little research and have seen some handlebar bags. Another alternative are some lightweight racks that you can put a seperate bag on. The rack attaches to the seat/seat posts. For example: Arkel brand
    Assuming you aren't talking about large temperature swings from cold to warm OR the possibility of on-and-off rain, you probably don't need much more storage space. A small handlebar bag (like the Lone Peak Pfeifferhorn) and a larger (possibly) seat back is likely all that you would need.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rwc5830 View Post
    Ideas are welcome, but don't rag on me for doing a 300K rando on a road bike
    Many people use road bikes for randos. Where they don't work quite so well is in wet-conditions and were you have to carry lots of stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rwc5830 View Post
    One of these days my N+1 will be more of a touring bike but for now this is working.
    A touring bike is over-kill for rando.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 04-07-13 at 10:57 AM.

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