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  1. #1
    Senior Member CanadianBiker32's Avatar
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    When should I be doing rides over 5 hours etc?

    Training to do another 100 mile mountain bike for end of June.
    I have been training now, doing XC skiing and indoor riding.

    Since the event is end of june.

    and it is 2 nd week of february
    When should i be riding long distances of almost 100 miles to be able to ride the event distance properly?

    i was aiming for end of March? would that be too soon?
    burnout?
    what timeline would be recommended?

  2. #2
    Randomhead
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    why not now? I just rode 200 kilometers last weekend. But on a more serious note, you have plenty of time to prepare. People all have their own ways of training, but for me once I can ride 60 miles in good form I'm good to go 100, no problem. If you were riding 100 miles a day, I might worry about burnout, but the occasional 5 hour ride is nothing to worry about.

    Somehow the mountain bike part escaped me. I find mountain biking harder, and so I probably would work my way up to the distance a little more slowly. Still wouldn't worry about riding too much

  3. #3
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    I never really saw the point of doing training rides of a hundred miles to train for a hundred mile ride. Personally, if it's a real race, I'd be concentrating on intervals and speed work. If it's a ride and you can do 50-60% of the distance comfortably in the time you want then the rest is cake.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  4. #4
    Randomhead
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    I think my best season of randonneuring featured a maximum of 55 mile training rides twice a week. That particular ride has almost 6000 feet of climbing though.

  5. #5
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    Depends on the intensity. You could pootle around for 5 hours every day if you had the time. Like the others, I wouldn't do more than 1-2 long hard rides per week.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  6. #6
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    The only real way to burn out is to only have one goal. If you have multiple goals that you are always trying to accomplish the chance of burnout is very slim. Another key secret to avoiding burnout is to never ride the same route twice. Always chose a different place to go. That's the one reason riding long distance, cross country, is so easy. You are always seeing new territory versus seeing the same thing all the time. I remember the guy from the New Orleans area last year that posted here on this sub forum and he was trying to see if he could ride 100 miles each day he rode for the next 100 rides. He was planning to take a day off each week. I remember reading his posts about his ride each day. I was screaming out loud. I knew he didn't stand a chance at making his goal. He was always riding the same place every freakin' day. That is the quickest way to hit the wall of boredom that you'll ever show me. I ended up last year with over 90 days where I rode 100+ miles. I had 7 days where I rode over 200 miles. The difference between me and him, I never rode the same route twice. I was always riding new highways in the area and then I took off and rode roundtrip NH-St. Louis mid to late summer. I kept it new and invigorating every day.

    This year I'm trying to ride even more miles but this year I have a new challenge, to ride more miles than last year but do it without ever riding a single 100 mile day. I rode 21,200 miles last year. Always have multiple goals and never ride the same route. It's the quickest way to failure that you will ever show me. Sure you can ride to the same place but don't constantly use the same route. Of course that can be changed if part of your riding is running to the grocery store or something like that but if you are riding someplace 'new' than don't follow the same route.

    Here's a challenge for you. How many 100 mile days could you ride between now and the day of the event. Just a challenge for you. Like I said, have multiple goals, not just one. Make the event easy, make IT boring by already doing more than the event will require. When it comes time for the event blow the event/your personal best thus far, etc out of the water. The more you can do now the easier it will be later and the harder you can press later to make a faster time.

  7. #7
    Randomhead
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    when I'm training, I usually ride the same rides over and over. I don't have any trouble with burnout because of that. Of course, I don't ride long distances for training -- that's what the training is for.

    If you are riding 100 miles/day, there is a real issue with burnout no matter how many different routes you take. When I was younger, I rode that far every day for a month, but I was at a training camp so the only alternative was to play poker. I would really love to be in that shape again, but I'm afraid my wife wouldn't go for it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Burnout happens when riding stops being fun. no matter how you train keep it fun.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    ... When I was younger, I rode that far every day for a month, but I was at a training camp so the only alternative was to play poker. I would really love to be in that shape again, but I'm afraid my wife wouldn't go for it.
    My wife loves it when I do rides in other countries. That means we get to travel. Then my wife will say to me "hey don't you need to be out training? " ;
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

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