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  1. #26
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    I think that is generally up to the RBA who they let in and don't and I don't think any of them even check. I've seen people get into 1200ks when they didn't complete a whole series (not PBP they're a little more strict). The long distance community is pretty small and most people know who's experienced and who's not. If you have a thick ultra resume RBA's tend to look the other way. A rider new to brevets on the other hand...
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  2. #27
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    I've gone from a 200 to a 400 with no problem, and from hard weekend rides to 150 and 200 mile supported rides. However, it depends on the sadism of the RBA. Some 300's are really tough, nasty chipseal and gravel with super steep hills in the middle of nowhere, guys out of Deliverance hammering on metal in the clearings and 50 miles between controls. Also depends on how fast you are, how good you are at suffering and fixing a ride that's gone bad.

  3. #28
    Senior Member k7baixo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
    Ha! Point taken. My mindset when I posed my question totally discounted the fact that there are other long distance events aside from RUSA brevets. I was originally wondering what it would be like if someone off the street who had not rode much at all were to ride a 1200K event.
    Last year was my first full brevet year and I went from having never completed one to riding and finishing a 1200. I learned so much as we went from 300 to 400 and then 200, there's no way I could have started with 600 and certainly not 1200.

    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    I think that is generally up to the RBA who they let in and don't and I don't think any of them even check. I've seen people get into 1200ks when they didn't complete a whole series (not PBP they're a little more strict). The long distance community is pretty small and most people know who's experienced and who's not. If you have a thick ultra resume RBA's tend to look the other way. A rider new to brevets on the other hand...
    I corresponded earlier this year with a RBA who stated that I *had* to complete the full series to ride in his 1200 later this year. Most RBA's will let you ride their 1200 event if you completed a 1200 the year before. I knew PBP is an exception but I was a bit surprised to learn that about this event.

    fortunately, my schedule and plans were already set for another 1200. I wasn't going to give the RBA a hard time. Their ride/their rules but I suspect had I more experience, we could have worked it out.
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  4. #29
    Senior Member joewein's Avatar
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    It's not a huge leap from 200 km to 300 km. Before my first 300 km last May I did three rides of between 211-235 km in March and April, but the 300 was my first organised brevet. The biggest difference for me was the night time riding (and consequent lack of sleep) in the 300, for which I also practiced in one of the 200+ km rides.

    An hour a day a few days a week will help with speed, but I think you should also do a longer ride of several hours at least on the weekend for endurance.

  5. #30
    Senior Member BasicJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    BasicJim, just go ride a bunch. If you live where it's hilly, go ride hills.
    The big question is not so much "can it be done" but "can it be done in a reasonable time while enjoying the experience". The more you're able to get out and ride, the easier it'll be.
    That's the game plan then! Thanks! It looks like we may actually get above 35°F so I'll get out the door rather than rollers!
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  6. #31
    Senior Member BasicJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    as far as the original question goes, I find the difference between being able to go 100 miles and 300k is eating. As long as I eat I do fine. I have also been known to ride too hard sometimes, but that generally doesn't stop me from finishing. The only problem for me is cramping, when I'm not in good enough shape I cramp a lot. For me, enduralites fix that problem pretty well
    When I did the 200K I didn't do too much in the way of nutrition. Some Gu packs, some Hammer drink, lots of water. A PB&J for lunch. Is the extra 100K a big game changer? (I know, everyones different. YMMV). I might have to rethink my nutrition plan a bit.
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  7. #32
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    if it was my ride and I had no idea if a person would finish, I would ask them what they will do if they can't. If the answer is "call you," I might suggest working up to the longer distance.

    I am pretty sure these things are up to the organizer and not a hard and fast rule. I have heard of cases where people have been allowed to ride 1200k's without a qualifying series. Don't try this with PBP
    AIUI PBP requires a super randonneur series to be completed as a qualifier but London-Edinburgh-London has no requirements to enter over and above paying the entry fee...

    Quote Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
    How does somebody do a 1200k without having previously ridden a series? I imagine that that's a decision that would be immediately regretted.
    ... which is why I didn't enter London-Edinburgh-London
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  8. #33
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BasicJim View Post
    When I did the 200K I didn't do too much in the way of nutrition. Some Gu packs, some Hammer drink, lots of water. A PB&J for lunch. Is the extra 100K a big game changer? (I know, everyones different. YMMV). I might have to rethink my nutrition plan a bit.
    It was for me. I can eat a big breakfast and just snack a bit during a 200 and be okay, but hungry at the end. On the one and only 300 I ever did, I was still hungry at the end of the first 200, so I needed to have a larger meal.

  9. #34
    Senior Member Commodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamster View Post
    How do you figure?
    It's just a different set of rules. A double 'century' is 320 kms, there is no 320 km standard distance event in randonneuring.

  10. #35
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BasicJim View Post
    When I did the 200K I didn't do too much in the way of nutrition. Some Gu packs, some Hammer drink, lots of water. A PB&J for lunch. Is the extra 100K a big game changer? (I know, everyones different. YMMV). I might have to rethink my nutrition plan a bit.
    I think it makes a difference. I treat 200 and 300 the same, meaning the usual 250 cal./hr. thing. You probably should think more along those lines rather than what you can get by with. That last 100 does come a little harder. It's all day, right? So your usual all-day eating plan at home is what? Plus you'll burn X many calories per hour for 10 or 13 or however many hours on the bike? So already you can't eat that much. Your stomach won't stand for it. So we fall back on that 250 cal./hr. which most folks can tolerate. The more you can eat on the bike, the more likely you are to finish feeling decent. I don't think hydration on a 200 and a 300 is all that different, but electrolytes are more likely to become an issue. So on your training rides, try to eat at that rate. See what you like and don't like and what you can and cannot tolerate.

  11. #36
    Senior Member skiffrun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
    ...
    I corresponded earlier this year with a RBA who stated that I *had* to complete the full series to ride in his 1200 later this year. Most RBA's will let you ride their 1200 event if you completed a 1200 the year before. I knew PBP is an exception but I was a bit surprised to learn that about this event.

    ... I wasn't going to give the RBA a hard time. Their ride/their rules but I suspect had I more experience, we could have worked it out.
    With the US domestic 1200's filling-up so rapidly, perhaps the RBA's may be getting a bit stricter, just to provide a filter.

    I wouldn't expect "DD" or "jle" to cut-me-any-slack. I wouldn't expect "TG" to cut me any slack, either -- but he might IF he had room for another rider. The difference? I know "TG"; he knows what I can ride.

    ============================================

    Re: Maria (RUSA #8001) -- as I understand it, she did her ToC-1200 as a solo worker's-ride, and then worked at some of the controls during the event-proper. (I've never met Maria -- we do have some friends in common -- real world friends.)
    Enjoy the ride.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BasicJim View Post
    When I did the 200K I didn't do too much in the way of nutrition. Some Gu packs, some Hammer drink, lots of water. A PB&J for lunch. Is the extra 100K a big game changer? (I know, everyones different. YMMV). I might have to rethink my nutrition plan a bit.
    I have done fairly long rides, maybe up to 400k, eating only junk food, soda, bananas and chocolate milk. First day of the ToC 1200k, for example. I ate pizza, pbj when they were provided at controles, but that was the second day. There was one controle where I ate a cheesesteak, and it lasted me about 100 miles (no climbing though). I like to eat real food, but I don't need to do so on a 300k.

  13. #38
    Lurking Under a Rock
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    Quote Originally Posted by BasicJim View Post
    I did my first 200K last fall and loved it. I signed up for a 300K in May and I just realized it's March!!

    I have been doing 3-4 days a week (1 hr ) on the rollers for the past few months. I feel confident that I could go do 100mi today but I am not sure about 300K. I need to ramp it up.

    Should I just keep with the same I am doing but add in some long rides going from 4 hrs and adding an hour each week?

    Thoughts?

    Basicjim
    To answer the OP's question, 1.5-2 months is plenty of time. My suggestion would be to "ride your ride" and not worry about hammering it down. And remember to eat! 300k is starting to get into the distance where you need to concentrate on your nutrition as much as your riding. I would definitely add in some longer rides on the weekend. I created 100k perm pop's from my house so I can get "Credit" for my training rides. The more you ride, the better off you'll be.

    Despite what others are saying here, there is no RUSA rule which would preclude you from riding a 300k. My first brevet was a 300k, and I finished (had mechanical problems). I would urge you check out your lighting situation. I waited by the side of the road for a group with proper lights who were kind enough to let me into their fold.

  14. #39
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    I didn't get decent lights until a disastrous 400k in 5 hours of rain that started at dark. Nobody would ride in front of me and I could only go as fast as my (failing) lights would take me. This is one of the experiences that made me consider the joy of riding by myself. Rain and lights are a bad combination. The other thing to consider about lights is that you may not use them to capacity until the 400k or some similar length ride. My first 300k I finished just after it got dark. That was nice, going to try to get that fast again.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    I didn't get decent lights until a disastrous 400k in 5 hours of rain that started at dark. Nobody would ride in front of me and I could only go as fast as my (failing) lights would take me. This is one of the experiences that made me consider the joy of riding by myself. Rain and lights are a bad combination. The other thing to consider about lights is that you may not use them to capacity until the 400k or some similar length ride. My first 300k I finished just after it got dark. That was nice, going to try to get that fast again.
    I'd like to have the confidence that I would always finish a 300k in the daylight. But, I have finished before the sun set, and I have finished after.

  16. #41
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    I have finished an SR series with about 4 hours to spare - total. If you are going to pull a stunt like that, your lights have to be good. My second 300k, I was slow and didn't finish until midnight. Since in gets dark at 7, that means 5 hours in the dark. That is generally long enough to test your lights, but it's nothing like getting into the finish at daybreak on a 400k, which I have done a couple of times now. The second sunup is definitely better

  17. #42
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    I don't always bring lights on 300ks. Only if I know I will be coming in near or after dark. If you do that though, there is always the risk of dnfing if you get delayed for some reason. Then the RBA will be peeved at you for having to pick you up.
    Last edited by Homeyba; 03-21-13 at 11:05 AM.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  18. #43
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    our 300k/400k/600k starts in the dark, so there is no chance to do that. I like having lights

  19. #44
    Senior Member EdgewaterDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    our 300k/400k/600k starts in the dark, so there is no chance to do that. I like having lights
    That's interesting. I just had a look at the PA Randonneurs web site - 4AM departure seems really early. But, that's a smart idea to make most of the daylight. Our 400K/600K starts at 6AM, with the 200/300 at 7A.

  20. #45
    Senior Member joewein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    I don't always bring lights on 300ks.
    For brevets here in Japan they won't even let you start unless you have lights, because local road regulations require a front light and a bell. Riding without lights is not an option.

    For the 300 I'm going to do in May, two head lights are required and two lights on the rear (one that has to be attached to the frame, the other can be a helmet light).

  21. #46
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    I did my first 300K three weeks after my first 200K randonnee. I had ridden a number of centuries and a 200 km ride at my own pace before that, so the 200K wasn't a big deal ... but I'd never ridden more than that, so the 300K was a bigger deal.

    I'd have to dig out my old records, but I think I did my usual commute in between the rides, plus a 100 km ride and an 80 km ride on the weekends in between.

    And yes ... you do have to pay a bit more attention to nutrition. Also, it's a good idea to travel prepared for flat tires, darkness, etc.

  22. #47
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
    Well usually you're required to do a 200k the same season to 'qualify' for a 300. As with most things rando, though, the rules are applied fairly casually.

    But, generally your performance on the qualifying 200 instructs you as to your condition.
    I have heard that is an American thing ... don't know if that's true or not, but that's what I've been told.

    In other countries you can ride the randonnees in any order you want (with the possible exception of the 1200K which may require you to complete a full SR series).

  23. #48
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
    How does somebody do a 1200k without having previously ridden a series? I imagine that that's a decision that would be immediately regretted.
    I've heard of people who have done rides like the Furnace Creek 500 being allowed to ride a 1200K without doing an SR series. There are lots of long distance events out there, not just randonneuring. If you've proven yourself in another one, you may be able to do a 1200K just fine.

  24. #49
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
    a double century ain't a brevet tho.

    I mean it could be, but not by definition.
    Quote Originally Posted by hamster View Post
    How do you figure?
    Double centuries and randonnees are two different things.

    Randonnees are organised by Audax or Randonneuring clubs under BRM or ACP. Double centuries are organised by some other club ... could be a touring club or a racing club.

    Randonnees have very specific rules and time limits. Double centuries can be ridden as fast or as slow as you want ... depending, of course, on when the volunteers go home.

    Randonnees are 200K, 300K, 400K, 600K, 1000K, and 1200K. Double centuries are 323 km.

  25. #50
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BasicJim View Post
    When I did the 200K I didn't do too much in the way of nutrition. Some Gu packs, some Hammer drink, lots of water. A PB&J for lunch. Is the extra 100K a big game changer? (I know, everyones different. YMMV). I might have to rethink my nutrition plan a bit.

    Aim for 200-300 calories per hour. Eat a good breakfast, and start nibbling about 15 minutes into the ride. You might not feel hungry soon after the 200K point, so all the eating you did early in the ride will give you some energy for later in the ride. But try to keep up with the eating as long as you can.

    Drink one 750 ml bottle every 1-1.5 hours.

    And if it is at all hot or strenuous, don't forget electrolytes.

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