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-   -   measure of 10% effort increment (http://www.bikeforums.net/long-distance-competition-ultracycling-randonneuring-endurance-cycling/906622-measure-10-effort-increment.html)

guner 08-10-13 05:19 AM

measure of 10% effort increment
 
Hi everyone, I am new to cycling sport and has been ride/commute on an old Montana MTB for more than 2 weeks.
However, my legs muscle are being too tight after 2 days of commute that I compelled to stop for 1 day or 2 for the recovery before I can get on the bike again.

The distance of the commute for round trip is 20km but I have added another 10km in the morning and at the speed of 20kph to my workplace is sustainable, still able to conserve a sentence.
I am decided to ride a 1000 mile for base mileage before I intend for any interval, hills or elite type of training. If I am telling you my goal is to able to ride at 40kph for 80km distance, this is what I will do whatever it takes.

They said you shouldn't increase your mileage more than 10% a week, I am wondering if I increase the speed instead by 10% while maintaining the same distance. Will it yield any better result? How do you measure and increase 10% effort of your training?

Considering I am looking for the shortest time to pedal this 1k mile base, what is the best training method I can get it done?
Thanks.

Machka 08-10-13 05:39 AM

First of all, this is the Long Distance Forum. 80 km isn't really a long distance. It's a decent distance, a long-ish distance, but about double that is more long distance cycling. You might try asking your question in the road forum.

Nevertheless ...

Secondly, how old are you?


Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15945739)
If I am telling you my goal is to able to ride at 40kph for 80km distance, this is what I will do whatever it takes.

Good luck with that.


Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15945739)
I am wondering if I increase the speed instead by 10% while maintaining the same distance.

Good luck with that. Let us know how successful you are at increasing your speed 10% per week (after you finish your base, of course).


Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15945739)
Hi everyone, I am new to cycling sport and has been ride/commute on an old Montana MTB for more than 2 weeks.
However, my legs muscle are being too tight after 2 days of commute that I compelled to stop for 1 day or 2 for the recovery before I can get on the bike again.

The distance of the commute for round trip is 20km but I have added another 10km in the morning and at the speed of 20kph to my workplace is sustainable, still able to conserve a sentence.

They said you shouldn't increase your mileage more than 10% a week, I am wondering if I increase the speed instead by 10% while maintaining the same distance. Will it yield any better result? How do you measure and increase 10% effort of your training?

The 10% is simply distance. It could be a weekly distance or the distance you ride on one or two days each week. So, for example, if you commute 20 km/day, 3-4 days a week ... and then also ride 20 km each day on Saturday and Sunday ... increase Saturday and Sunday's distance by 10% each. So next week, do 22 km each day. The following week do about 25 km each day. The next week do about 28 km each day ..... etc.

The whole idea of building a base is about putting in saddle time, increasing distance. Not increasing speed.




Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15945739)
I am decided to ride a 1000 mile for base mileage before I intend for any interval, hills or elite type of training. .....Considering I am looking for the shortest time to pedal this 1k mile base, what is the best training method I can get it done?
Thanks.

Just keep gradually increasing your distance as described above, and you'll get there. It's not something you're supposed to rush through.



And if you're in South Africa or Australia, this is indeed the time to work on your base. Start working now in late winter, and you could have a decent base and be ready for speed and strength work come mid-spring (October).

However, if you're in North America or Europe, it's a bit late in the season to be working on a base. Keep going with it anyway, keep up your fitness over winter, and you might be ready to start working on speed and strength come March.

znomit 08-10-13 05:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15945739)
If I am telling you my goal is to able to ride at 40kph for 80km distance, this is what I will do whatever it takes.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Machka (Post 15945754)
80 km isn't really a long distance.

It bloody well is at 40kph :twitchy:

Machka 08-10-13 06:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by znomit (Post 15945758)
It bloody well is at 40kph :twitchy:


Depends how you look at it ... at 40 km/h that's just a 2 hour ride. But on the other hand, that's a whole lot of effort!! :D

guner 08-22-13 06:47 AM

Thank you for your input, Machka.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Machka (Post 15945754)
Secondly, how old are you?

I am 31 years young man ;) who potato coach for a year like that..

Currently I am in my first week of base build. I have a lot of doubt in the cycling training, so please bear with my immature about the sport.:)

First I want to ask about HR training. I didn't test my max HR for some reason, but my rest HR is 60. I assume my MHR is 176 base on the age formula, with few beat less. So I started the Zone 2 training where the range would be 141-147 according the Karvonen formula. While the ride, I can breath comfortably, neither too hard nor too easy, still able to conserve a sentence (can I test with "testing 1 2 3"?). But after finish each ride I have had my heart beat more than 95bpm throughout the day, I can feel the fast, unusual heart beat and often felt I needed a bigger inhale as if I am short of oxygen. Am I overtrained? What is the appropriate HR training zone should I've gone too far?

Secondly is do I need recovery week pop in to this base build? An article stated I need four to six recovery week separated in between the base build period, and I planned to do 12 weeks base build not including recovery week.

Machka 08-22-13 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15987152)
Thank you for your input, Machka.


I am 31 years young man ;) who potato coach for a year like that..

Currently I am in my first week of base build. I have a lot of doubt in the cycling training, so please bear with my immature about the sport.:)


I don't want to burst your bubble, but going from a couch potato to a 31 year old who is in his first week of base build, your goal of cycling at 40kph for 80km distance is way over the top. I'm not saying it is impossible, but it is highly improbable that you'll succeed in doing that this year ... or perhaps ever.

There is a huge difference between being able to ride 10 km at 20 km/h and being able to ride 80 km at 40 km/h. There's a big difference in going from 10 km at 20 km/h to 10 km at 25 km/h.

A more realistic goal, especially for this year, might be to ride 80 km at 25+ km/h.



Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15987152)
First I want to ask about HR training. I didn't test my max HR for some reason, but my rest HR is 60. I assume my MHR is 176 base on the age formula, with few beat less. So I started the Zone 2 training where the range would be 141-147 according the Karvonen formula. While the ride, I can breath comfortably, neither too hard nor too easy, still able to conserve a sentence (can I test with "testing 1 2 3"?). But after finish each ride I have had my heart beat more than 95bpm throughout the day, I can feel the fast, unusual heart beat and often felt I needed a bigger inhale as if I am short of oxygen. Am I overtrained? What is the appropriate HR training zone should I've gone too far?

The max HR formula is an estimate ... not an exact science. My max HR was well over the number generated by that formula.

However, any cardio-pulmonary issues ... such as the ones you describe ... need to be checked by a Dr. Any time you go from couch potato to starting an exercise program, it is advised that a person should see a Dr. anyway to ensure that you can handle it, but with the symptoms you describe, it is even more important.


Quote:

Originally Posted by guner (Post 15987152)
Secondly is do I need recovery week pop in to this base build? An article stated I need four to six recovery week separated in between the base build period, and I planned to do 12 weeks base build not including recovery week.

I think the general recommendation is that you ride 4 weeks, 5 days a week, at a long steady distance pace for 3 weeks, and then on the 4th week, you cut back a bit on distance and ride a little easier. And repeat ... 4 on, 1 relaxed ... etc.

Carbonfiberboy 08-22-13 08:21 AM

I think that just starting riding a bike and also starting heart rate periodized training is too much. It's better not to have goals at this time. Just ride your bike for a year. Having goals too soon can disappoint you. What you want now is success, defined as being able to ride your bike. Don't ask for more than that. You can watch your heart rate, but don't push it. Just put in the miles and gradually increase the length of your rides. Try to have fun on the bike. Explore roads you have never driven you car on.

Observe the 10% distance increase rule. I figure that is weekly distance, which is a measure of the total stress on your body. You'll find that 10% is really too fast an increase after a bit. Compound interest. One longer ride on the weekend is a good idea.

unterhausen 08-22-13 08:39 AM

it took me 30+ years to realize that I'm a sprinter, not the type of person that can really expect to go 40km for an extended period by myself. More like 65km/hr for a couple hundred meters. At my peak, I could barely manage solo 40km/hr for an hour, and that was after a tremendous amount of training. Now, I find myself just enjoying riding my bike, although I would like to be faster.

Which is to say, try to be patient, lose some weight, build up slowly. You have many years to reach a goal. I would expect to reach some level of stagnation if you try to take it too fast. In fact, it's really hard not to get into a period of stagnation no matter what you do.

blacknbluebikes 08-23-13 08:01 AM

I think everyone changes their perspective after the first 600-700 miles. As the experience builds, you will calibrate new goals based on new knowledge attained first-hand. Keep up the enthusiasm, ride five or six days a week, listen to what your body tells you.


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