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  1. #1
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    Training Strategies

    Looking for some advice regarding picking a training strategy. I'm 59, retired Army, but have been off the bike for several years due to some injuries I suffered. I picked up a copy of Maffetones "Endurance Training and Racing" with hopes of getting back into doing centuries and brevats next year (2014). Any thoughts on his methods, especially the lower hr training he talks about? Seems most people are into the intervals and higher hr rates, so trying to get some advice based on experience.

    Thanks
    John

  2. #2
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Hi, You have found the right place.

    I'm your age and I enjoy century rides. I returned to cycling 5 years ago. I started by cycling every-other day. I increased my miles/day from 20 to 45 during the first 3 months. After 3 months, I continued to ride every-other day, but half my rides were faster 25 mile rides and the other half were longer 60 mile rides.

    Once I developed a base of 400 to 500 miles per month, I found it beneficial to train for speed part of the time.

    After 6 months, I began doing Century rides.

    Being able to reduce my century time from 7 hours to less than 6 hours made the day easier. It's not just the distance that make a century ride a mental and physical challenge for someone returning to cycling, it's the time in the saddle.

    Later, I trained with a club and worked on a trainer to further increase climbing strength and speed.
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    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    I may be wrong, but I believe Maffetone endorses the "long slow distance" (LSD) training methodology. This suggests that you do lots of long rides at low intensity / low HR.

    LSD has been superseded by interval training and periodization. If all you do is ride in HR zone 1 and 2 all day long, you will plateau in a few weeks.

    The best way to build your endurance, no matter what stage you are at, is to throw in a bit of intensity. E.g. each week should include a couple of rest days, a couple of days at tempo (HR zone 3), a long ride at moderate pace (mostly zones 1 and 2), and one day of intervals (e.g. pyramids).

    You might also consider setting an intermediate goal, such as completing a 100k ride before the end of 2013.

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    You are correct, He does endorse the long slow rides, plenty of miles, keep your hr down. Didn't know whether this is considered outmoded and has been superseded by other science. Appreciate the info.
    John

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe View Post
    I may be wrong, but I believe Maffetone endorses the "long slow distance" (LSD) training methodology. This suggests that you do lots of long rides at low intensity / low HR.

    LSD has been superseded by interval training and periodization. If all you do is ride in HR zone 1 and 2 all day long, you will plateau in a few weeks.

    The best way to build your endurance, no matter what stage you are at, is to throw in a bit of intensity. E.g. each week should include a couple of rest days, a couple of days at tempo (HR zone 3), a long ride at moderate pace (mostly zones 1 and 2), and one day of intervals (e.g. pyramids).

    You might also consider setting an intermediate goal, such as completing a 100k ride before the end of 2013.

  5. #5
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    Appreciate the info, nice to hear from someone my age.
    John
    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    Hi, You have found the right place.

    I'm your age and I enjoy century rides. I returned to cycling 5 years ago. I started by cycling every-other day. I increased my miles/day from 20 to 45 during the first 3 months. After 3 months, I continued to ride every-other day, but half my rides were faster 25 mile rides and the other half were longer 60 mile rides.

    Once I developed a base of 400 to 500 miles per month, I found it beneficial to train for speed part of the time.

    After 6 months, I began doing Century rides.

    Being able to reduce my century time from 7 hours to less than 6 hours made the day easier. It's not just the distance that make a century ride a mental and physical challenge for someone returning to cycling, it's the time in the saddle.

    Later, I trained with a club and worked on a trainer to further increase climbing strength and speed.

  6. #6
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
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    The most important thing for new people is not to get burnt out. Just get in the habit of riding regularly. Most people probably quit within the first 3 months or so. So I would say just ride for fun for 3 months. Some days you may feel like doing some sprints. Some days you may feel like climbing. Some days you may feel like just cruising. I'd say just spend the winter doing what you want and not worry about specific training until next year. You'll get some basic fitness back and then your body and mind will be more prepared for the difficult stuff.
    centuryperweek.blogspot.com

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    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdat12 View Post
    You are correct, He does endorse the long slow rides, plenty of miles, keep your hr down. Didn't know whether this is considered outmoded and has been superseded by other science.
    Yep. LSD was big in the 80s. Nowadays cyclists barely know what it is.

    Although she does not discuss specific training plans, Renyold's The First 20 Minutes has a good explanation of why alternating intensity and easy efforts works.

    I'm still using variations of the plan offered by Burke & Pavelka inThe Complete Book of Long Distance Cycling. It's pretty easy to set up and follow.

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    "You might also consider setting an intermediate goal, such as completing a 100k ride before the end of 2013."
    If I can find one around Portland around Thanksgiving I may. Considering just riding a permanent 100k if need be.
    Thanks the advice

    John

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    most people are following something akin to Joel Freil's book. My kids bought me the one for people over 50 just to rub my nose in the fact that I'm old, but you can get his other book and get the same info

    I think the most important thing to do if you are going to ride is to get a road bike and start riding.

  10. #10
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdat12 View Post
    "You might also consider setting an intermediate goal, such as completing a 100k ride before the end of 2013."
    If I can find one around Portland around Thanksgiving I may. Considering just riding a permanent 100k if need be.
    Thanks the advice

    John
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    Randomhead
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    my big goal when I started riding again was the local "macho" ride up to Black Moshannon park. I kinda wish I hadn't done it, I've never actually had muscle pain like that before or since

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    Senior Member Mycoalson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    my big goal when I started riding again was the local "macho" ride up to Black Moshannon park. I kinda wish I hadn't done it, I've never actually had muscle pain like that before or since

    I rode in '07. A discount store bike, but I got to doing some distance. Last year I started again. My body image and my ego were totally out of whack with reality.

    The longest(feeling), most painful, scariest ride I've ever been on was a thirty-four mile ride, over flat, paved river front ground last year. I literally thought I might die.

    Of course, now, a ride 3x as long doesn't seem as long, is no where near as painful, and not scary at all. I had no idea how self deceptive my mind could be....I was in bad shape when I started, but my mental attitude was I was half my age, 80 pounds lighter, and knew what I was doing.

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    ThermionicScott , am learning the roads around Portland, just moved here 3 weeks ago, but that is a good idea, thanks.

    This is a learning experience, but I've already learned the hard way that I'm not in my twenties or even my 40's anymore. I intend to enjoy myself and have a great time, when I rode before it was simply as a form of exercise. Now I can set some goals and work to achieve them without pushing it to the point that it's not fun, been down that road in the past. Thanks for all the advice, good people on this forum.

  14. #14
    Senior Member rgwinn's Avatar
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    I discovered a good way yesterday, take off with the wrong group in a group ride.

    I just got back in the Saddle after 15 years, started riding again 4 weeks ago with a group organized by one of the local shops.

    Did a couple easy 24mile Saturday morning rides with the "slow" group.

    Took off last night with the faster group, kept up ok on the flats, then dropped back on the hills, but I finished with the group. Felt good. And I know that to get better I need to push myself.

    Working on getting in 3 rides a week with a goal of getting in a century or two next spring.

    Feels good to be riding again.
    Remember; "You only DIE once, you live every day"

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