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  1. #1
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    Looking for SPD-SL shoe that's not a pain to walk with

    Hi again.

    A friend is giving me his old spd-sl shimano (I don't know the model) pedal and I'm looking for a shoe.

    The biggest issue is that wherever I read anything about road shoes, it's always the same complaint. Good to ride, terrible to walk.

    Is there any model that fills this gap? I'm not looking for performance. It's all about comfort

    Also, if the shoe can fit the SPD/CLick'r pattern, it's even better.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mprelaw's Avatar
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    The cleats are actually more suited for walking short distances than most other road pedal cleats. If you're going into stores for food or water, or using a public restroom, just be careful on wet floors. All road shoes will have fairly stiff soles, but the SPD-SL cleats will hold up for short walks, even on cement or pavement.

  3. #3
    Gear Combo Guru Chris_W's Avatar
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    Even though it sounds like you can get the SPD-SL pedals for free, a basic pair of SPD pedals are only about $40, sometimes less, and will work fine, and you'll then have no problem finding some shoes that you can walk in.

  4. #4
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    MTB shoes are better for walking than road shoes.

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    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Figure out what you want to do and buy pedals and shoes accordingly. If you're mainly riding, SPD road pedals are fine. For rando riding, we use them, go in the stores, etc., no problem.

    The pedals do wear out (bearings go bad, they start clicking, etc.), so don't assume an old pedal has indefinite life left. Also, they make different models, a high-end one is more worth using than a low-end one, if it's free.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  6. #6
    Dharma Dog lhbernhardt's Avatar
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    I have been using Shimano RT-81 shoes (and its predecessors) for long rides (PBP, LEL) where some walking around may be required. The RT series is basically a mountain bike shoe with a smooth sole (no lugs) that takes the Shimano SPD cleats (not the SL, but the standard mountain bike cleats). You can use these cleats with a variety of road or mtb pedals. The shoes are stiff enough to hold up to all-day riding.

    In your case, you can actually get a cleat adaptor for around $20 that will let you use your shoes with the 3-hole (Look) pattern with Shimano mtb cleats. However, they are made of plastic, so not sure if they would last as long as an actual rubber sole, like on the RT series.

    http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-SM-SH4.../dp/B004QEWMXY

    Luis

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    The problem with walking in road shoes isn't so much the shoe, it's the cleat. If you stick a giant triangular piece of hard plastic to the bottom of your shoe, it gets hard to walk. Those cleats can be really slippery on wet linoleum, incidentally. They also wear out faster under typical rando conditions than metal cleats do: riding in bad weather and getting grit in there will wear them down faster in places that affect clipping in and out, or at least let the cleat shift around in the pedal.
    I know some riders swear by road pedals for the larger platform, but I suspect that in most cases, the position of the cleat and the fit of the shoes are much more important. A free pair of pedals isn't sufficient justification for the choice, IMHO... not to mention that SPD-SL cleats wear out a lot faster, especially if you do things like ride in bad weather and step in mud/grit, and replacements aren't free. And shoes aren't free either. If you're going to spend the money on shoes, get the shoes that feel the best and fit the best and do what you need them to do.

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    Hi there.
    to provide a feedback, I refused the spd-sl pedals and bought a a530 touring spd.

    Found some good reviews and I'm planning to use SPD on my commuter too.
    Gonna install the a530 on my touring/cross/rando bike and t400 on my commuter later (when I build it)

    I found a shoe that is kinda walkable with spd-sl cleats on a similar old thread (http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...uot-Road-Shoes)
    it's the lake cx125 which isn't produced anymore.

    Now I'm looking for a good SPD shoe to make it all around. Found some good reviews on the new shimano click'r shoes (sh ct 40/45/70)
    Found a reasonable price on the ct70, and I like it's apearance a lot.
    If you guys have something against this shoe, please tell me.
    I'm gonna use it to rando/commuting/touring
    If it's not stiff enough for long distance rides, please let me know.

    huge thanks

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    The single most important thing in shoes is that they fit your feet. Forget the reviews, forget what other people like, unless they have the same exact feet as you. Go to every shop you can find and try on every single pair of shoes that you can afford, from the cheapest to the most expensive. Ignore what they look like and ignore the price. Put your feet in them and stand up and try to feel how they fit, how the footbed matches your foot, how much wiggle room your toes have, whether you can adjust the straps/buckles/whatever so that they don't bite into your foot anywhere. For long distances, you might consider going a size larger than normal since that will give you either room for your feet to swell or room for thicker or extra socks if it's chilly.

    It's likely that you'll find one brand that fits the best, and the fit will be fairly similar (although not necessarily identical) between the different models, but different arrangements of straps, buckles, laces, etc. will hold your feet in slightly different places, which can make a difference depending on the shape of the top of your feet.

    Personally, I have the best luck with the fit of Shimano shoes. Of the two pairs that have been the most comfortable, one was a high-end model and one was a low-end model. My biggest complaint about the high-end ones is that they have a ratcheting buckle that's annoying if you're putting on leg warmers, sitting cross-legged on the ground at a gas station, etc. My biggest complaint about the low-end ones is that they are fairly heavy and fairly absorbent, so when they get wet they stay wet for a long time. But at the same time they keep my feet more comfortable when it's dry and chilly.

    But basically, all the stuff from all the big-name brands is going to be good enough in terms of quality. The look is different, the "features" like fancy buckles are different, the weight and the kind of sole is different, but the part that really matters is whether they fit your feet and that is not necessarily price-dependent. Sidi's are beautiful, high-quality, well-designed shoes, but they are the wrong shape for my feet. If I were out on a long ride wearing them, I would not care that they are beautiful and well-designed, I would care that the footbed was digging into my foot in some weird way.

  10. #10
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    coluber, thanks for this advice, but I have some issues here that is common to me (brazil).
    Due to the high import taxes, most stores don't buy good shoes.
    It's kinda hard to find several models of any shoe.

    Usually, it's the cheapest (which is kinda expensive here) that it's available and that's that.

    Just to make an example, usually it's kinda 3 to 6 times the prices you pay there (or I pay thru ebay).
    A shimano sh-xx shoe that costs around 80,00 on a store on US, should cost around 200,00 on BR (dollar exchange + store profit) but it costs around 400,00 or depending on case, doesnt even exist here, because it wouldnt sell.
    That's why I look for reviews.

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    Ouch. Well, that makes it harder. :/

    FWIW, I've had a whole bunch of different Shimano shoes over the years (like I said, they fit my feet). I generally prefer not having the ratchet buckle for the reasons I mentioned, but my current newest pair has it and it isn't the end of the world. Most of them tend to stretch a bit and get looser when they get wet, but they shrink back when they dry. Assuming they fit well, I don't think you can go far wrong with Shimano shoes or any of the other major established brands. But fit is what will really make the difference as to whether they work for you or not. If you have some idea of whether you have wide feet, narrow feet, etc, maybe that will help you read reviews for what's most likely to fit?

  12. #12
    Gear Combo Guru Chris_W's Avatar
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    What's up with the prices in Brazil? I work in a Specialized bike shop in Switzerland, and once or twice per year we have Brazilians coming in to buy a top-end bike (US$5000+), take it out for one ride to get it dirty, then have us put it back in the box so that they can take it back to Brazil with them and save lots of money on taxes. They tell us that taxes on bikes like these are in the "luxury goods" category and so incur insane sales tax rates. But how does that help when it causes everyone to buys that stuff abroad instead?

    I can sort of understand it for a $5000 bike, but for a $100 pair of shoes? Are soccer shoes also considered "luxury items" in Brazil, or are they classified as essential purchases, and so are exempt from all taxes?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coluber42 View Post
    Ouch. Well, that makes it harder. :/

    FWIW, I've had a whole bunch of different Shimano shoes over the years (like I said, they fit my feet). I generally prefer not having the ratchet buckle for the reasons I mentioned, but my current newest pair has it and it isn't the end of the world. Most of them tend to stretch a bit and get looser when they get wet, but they shrink back when they dry. Assuming they fit well, I don't think you can go far wrong with Shimano shoes or any of the other major established brands. But fit is what will really make the difference as to whether they work for you or not. If you have some idea of whether you have wide feet, narrow feet, etc, maybe that will help you read reviews for what's most likely to fit?
    Yes, I do that.
    I have mid-narrow feet and I avoid reviews claiming a shoe good for wide feet.


    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post
    What's up with the prices in Brazil? I work in a Specialized bike shop in Switzerland, and once or twice per year we have Brazilians coming in to buy a top-end bike (US$5000+), take it out for one ride to get it dirty, then have us put it back in the box so that they can take it back to Brazil with them and save lots of money on taxes. They tell us that taxes on bikes like these are in the "luxury goods" category and so incur insane sales tax rates. But how does that help when it causes everyone to buys that stuff abroad instead?

    I can sort of understand it for a $5000 bike, but for a $100 pair of shoes? Are soccer shoes also considered "luxury items" in Brazil, or are they classified as essential purchases, and so are exempt from all taxes?
    Soccer has a lot of tax incentives here and the shoes sell a lot. It's by far, the only "serious" sport here. Volleyball comes in second.
    They produce it here, what makes it cheap in several stores.

    By far, most brazillians still think that bicycles are toys. Most people still think bicycles should be used only for recreational purposes and properly dressed cyclists (me included) are usually called a "mad person". Even by family
    The biggest issue is the lack of respect on traffic and in second place is the cost of the sport (even if you use it to commute).

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