Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-02-14, 05:25 PM   #1
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Long-Distance Racing Bike

I'm considering participating in more 24-hour type races. The bikes I have are not particuarly well-suited for this, and so I'm looking at the alternatives for buying a little speed.

Right now, I'm running maybe 230 lbs at 6'-2" or so, so I've got some extra weight. Based on past experience, I may be faster or slower, but if I place well in a race, it'll likely be due to weak competition rather than exceptional performance on my part. So it's not like I'm the top ultraracer or anything, I'm just plugging away and want to plug away faster. My budget is the low end of the market, so $2,000-$3,000 maybe, but not $8,000. Subtle improvements that save a half-ounce of weight or drag are pretty much going to be wasted, so I don't need the top-end equipment. And new or used would be under consideration. The routes in question usually include hills but not mountains. The races in question are generally non-drafting, without a follow car.

Regardless, as best I can tell, nobody actually sells a bike suited for this activity. But it looks like the options are:
-A conventional time-trial or tri-bike, which are mostly carbon-fiber with a few aluminum frames available. Drawbacks are that they're not normally set up to carry lights, extra clothing, camelbaks, or other items required for a 500 mile race that aren't required to ride 40k or 112 miles or whatever; and typically anticipate light use by a light rider, not thousands and thousands of miles with a heftier rider on chipseal roads.
-Titanium time-trial bike, used by some of the local riders, but as far as I can tell, not in current production unless you just custom-order a frame. But, they pop up on Ebay on occasion.
-A lighter faster road-bike than what I now have, possibly with aerobars. But I understand using aerobars on a regular road bike makes for some squirrely overly-sensitive handling, too, and I have no desire to go kill myself. Another concern is that it may not really be much faster than what I'm riding now (Raleigh Sojourn).

I'd be interested in your thoughts on the best approach to this.

Some other questions-
On the time-trial bikes, do you go get fitted for one before you buy it? Then get fitted again when you get it? Or is that all one fitting?
How do you know if a style of bike will be comfortable for long distances if you've never tried it, period?
How do you work out a good compromise on wheels, between light/aerodynamic/indestructible/cheap?
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 07:26 PM   #2
DaHaMac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Thomaston, Georgia
Bikes: 2013 Raleigh Clubman, 2010 Schwinn LeTour, 2012 Raleigh Sojourn, 2011 Schwinn Voyaguer 7
Posts: 217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been running such thoughts through my mind for a while. I too am ~230lb and ride a Raleigh Sojourn but bought a Raleigh Clubman for a Brevet bike since concluding that there is not one best bike for Rando's and Racing. However a LD racing bike will work nicely for me up to the 400k level.

I would say Volagi Liscio but they do not recommend it for a rider over 220lbs. The Viaje I like would cost $3k. Therefore, I am now looking at something like either a Cielo Sportif Racer or a custom steel/titanium frame from either Waterford, Strong Frames, or Seven Cycles. Calculating about $2.5k for the frame and fork. I'll buy parts for my 2010 alloy Schwinn LeTour until I can afford the new frame. BTW, I actually love my current bike's geometry since LBS installed a Reynold's Ouza fork and I flipped and slammed the stem.
DaHaMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 08:00 PM   #3
chriskmurray
Senior Member
 
chriskmurray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Colorado Springs
Bikes: Borealis Echo, Ground Up Designs Ti Cross bike, Xtracycle, GT mod trials bike, pixie race machine
Posts: 1,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
What are your thoughts on the "endurance performance" bikes, basically more relaxed geometry carbon road bikes? I have used aero bars on bikes like this with no issues. The main thing seems to be getting them set up right so you are not reaching too far forward when in them.

http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...2/14806/66183/

http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2014...Series/z4.aspx

Both of these are really solid bikes on the lower end of your budget to leave room to make changes for preference items like bar/stem/saddle/wheels/etc

I personally have put some miles on the Z series Felt line and really liked it but I have never done much more than 60 miles at a time on one as it was just a demo bike.
chriskmurray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 08:10 PM   #4
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For distance a Tri or TT bike wouldn't be the best race bike (IMHO). The position is just too radical. Your best bet is to get a good carbon road bike, add some aerobars and deep dish wheels (in the 400mm+ range). You should be able to do that easily in your price range. If you are going to go fast over long distances aerobars are a must. Aerodynamics are huge! Getting in aerobars can reduce your frontal area by around 12 per cent compared to sitting upright. That’s enough to make five to seven minutes difference in a 40k time trial, extrapolate that out to 24+hrs and it's quite significant. It you're sitting upright, you're just giving time away. Yes, they will take a little time to get used to but they become second nature before too long.
Spend money on aerodynamics and reliability before you worry about weight. For reliability, the frame is no problem, I'd go with Ultegra level component. I think they are the best compromise between price, reliability and weight.

Lights are really not a big deal. You can put lights on just about anything. That'd be really low on my priority list.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 08:18 PM   #5
Number400
Senior Member
 
Number400's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: South Central PA
Bikes: Cannondale Slate 105 and T2 tandem, 2008 Scott Addict R4, GT Timberline, Raleigh SC drop bar tandem
Posts: 915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Some good advice above! I would look closely at the Carbon Scattante CFR series. Very solid frame and inexpensive and you can add aerobars and dial it in for comfort. I really enjoyed mine and used it in crits, road races, and a few TT's. It was my do anything bike and was light enough and very, very strong.
Number400 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 09:06 PM   #6
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Speaking of aerodynamics, get yourself an aero helmet. That will make a huge difference and is one of the best investments you can make. Loose any baggy clothing. Anything that is flapping in the breeze is costing you time. Remember, it's not any one thing but the combination of a lot of small things that add up.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-14, 09:34 PM   #7
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,719
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Just a comment, as a guy your height and size:

The Nashbar carbon stay aluminum frame is actually a dirt cheap, light, comfortable frame. I have owned the all aluminum and the carbon stay version, and the carbon stays make a noticeable difference. The 58 cm weighs 3.25 lbs, and can be a good platform for a build. They only have it in 60 cm now, so you would have to see what you think.

Just to blather a titch:

It has a 74 deg. STA, so it is easy to push forward to a more TT position, ahead of KOPS. The TT is short for its size, so drops with aero extensions are within easy reach. If you couple it with a 43 mm rake fork, you pick up enough trail so that the "twitchiness" of aero bars will not be as noticeable as a more neutral steering bike.

The frame is stiff as heck for power transfer. My FTP was 285 when I was riding mine, and I could not get appreciable flex out of the BB. It took everything I could give it.

If you spend $170 on a frame, you have a lot of budget left for wheels, which is where I would sink it. The 23 mm clincher rims are noticeably more comfy, and you can get very nice sets like Boyd's for under $600. I have no experience with the deep profile rims mentioned above, they may be far better, but you would have the budget to play.

And last, just an opinion, don't buy a fully built bike. As a big guy, I have always found wheels in the $2k and less bikes to be lacking in stiffness and durability, and stock gearing tends to be stupid. You want to walk into it knowing exactly what you want to get, and pick the pieces once that get you there.

Full disclosure: I have never done a 24 hour, so my advice may be worth less than the can of Wegman's Memphis baked beans I snacked on earlier. I have ridden that frame on multiple 130 to 150 mile days with never a care, but no 500 mile days. Good luck, and it is an exciting problem to have.
RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-14, 02:48 PM   #8
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think I'd buy an overly stiff frame aluminum frame for long distance. There are some really good aluminum frames out there but they are pretty expensive. You do want good power transfer with minimum flex but you also need to get to the finish line with your teeth still in your head. Bang for buck I think you're best off with a decent carbon frame.

One note about aerobars and long distance. If you go to the start of a long distance event you are going to see the vast majority of racers have aerobars on their bikes. If you look a little closer at the way they have them set up they are not slammed down in a full aero position. They tend to be set up a bit higher to allow better breathing, comfort and still retain a more aero position. See the diference between these two racers: The one in blue is in a typical TT position. You can see how flat his back is and how low his bars are. The rider in red is a RAAM racer. His bars are higher and he isn't quite as leaned over. It's actually quite a comfortable position for long distances.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-14, 03:47 PM   #9
DaHaMac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Thomaston, Georgia
Bikes: 2013 Raleigh Clubman, 2010 Schwinn LeTour, 2012 Raleigh Sojourn, 2011 Schwinn Voyaguer 7
Posts: 217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
How badly do the aerobars affect the bike's handling? Asked another way, does the trail of LD race bike need to tweaked or is the difference small enough to be handled by the rider?

Second question, any recommendations on which aero bars are best suited for an aspiring LD rider?
DaHaMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-14, 04:17 PM   #10
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Angelo, TX
Bikes: Volae Team, '76 Motobecane Grand Jubile
Posts: 1,706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm not hearing enough about comfort. Talk about giving away time, I've seen 24 hour racers off the bike getting a neck/shoulder massage during the event. Obviously fit is a big part of that, but frame material, design, and geometry need to consider long term comfort as well as power transfer.
downtube42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-14, 11:27 PM   #11
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHaMac View Post
How badly do the aerobars affect the bike's handling? Asked another way, does the trail of LD race bike need to tweaked or is the difference small enough to be handled by the rider?

Second question, any recommendations on which aero bars are best suited for an aspiring LD rider?
I guess it depends on who you ask. They do make the bike a little bit twitchier but it's something you get used to pretty quick. You don't need to tweak the geometry at all. Just take the obvious precautions like not riding in groups and get out of the aerobars and into the drops on technical descents or when the speeds get over45-50mph. Don't forget that you don't generally have brakes on them so you have to move your hands to the hoods to slow or stop.

You see a lot of Syntace bars because they are comfy light and you can easily add spacers to raise them, like these:
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-14, 11:41 PM   #12
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
I'm not hearing enough about comfort. Talk about giving away time, I've seen 24 hour racers off the bike getting a neck/shoulder massage during the event. Obviously fit is a big part of that, but frame material, design, and geometry need to consider long term comfort as well as power transfer.
Actually, that's what I've mostly been talking about. If someone is getting off the bike for anything during a 24hr race they are wasting time. As far as frame material goes, I've seen good long distance race bikes made out of just about every material. I raced on aluminum, titanium, steel and carbon and if they are made well they are all good with one little caveat. Over really long distances carbon bikes are "generally" better at dampening vibration. Not the big bump in the road kind but the low frequency kind that just wears on you after many hundreds of miles.

I don't see geometry, in and of itself, as much of a factor. It's more of a preference thing. Do you want the sports car handling or the VW Beetle handling. Your contact points and their location are what matters.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-14, 08:22 AM   #13
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,719
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Just for what it is worth, the only reason that I mentioned the Nashbar carbon rear frame is comfort. It is as comfortable as my steel Felt. I owned the all aluminum Nashbar frame, own a brutally stiff aluminum Cinelli, so i have very clear reference frames, and only mentioned the carbon mix version because it is cheap and absolutely atypically comfy.

OP, good luck and enjoy!
RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-14, 11:23 AM   #14
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RollCNY View Post
Just for what it is worth, ...
Sorry if I came across as demeaning your opinion. You could very well be right. I haven't ridden one. Just because a frame is expensive doesn't mean it's comfortable and visa-verse. I think you'd agree though, that 130mile century paced days are not the same as 300-400 mile race paced days. What would be really cool is if you took that Nashbar bike and did a 24hr race, RAAM qualifier or 500mile race and reported back. What you're offering is possibly a great option and it is only $170 so even if in didn't work out maybe it's worth giving it a try.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-14, 12:06 PM   #15
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,719
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
What would be really cool is if you took that Nashbar bike and did a 24hr race, RAAM qualifier or 500mile race and reported back. What you're offering is possibly a great option and it is only $170 so even if in didn't work out maybe it's worth giving it a try.
What is humorous (at least to me ) is I am considering that, which is why I read threads in this sub-forum. I did not mean to sound petulant, because you are more than likely right, and I respect every poster here's experience over mine. I am planning to circle NY state (excluding "Downstate") in the spring, 1200 miles, as a self-supported 6-7 day ride. It won't be 24 hours straight, but the plan is at least 200 miles per day, rinse, repeat. Should give a good comfort idea.

I will report back if I take it. Right now I am 70% Felt single speed/30% Nashbar geared.

OP I meant no thread diversion, and again, good luck. There are far worse problems to have then finding a frame for a new bike.
RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-14, 02:53 PM   #16
La Tortue
Senior Member
 
La Tortue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
How about thinking outside the box? Get that big body out of the wind and keep all the power-- go recumbent! Comfort , speed, and a support group as good as they come. Check out any ultra race. recumbents will be there.
La Tortue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-14, 09:00 PM   #17
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Thanks for all the input guys, haven't responded in a day or two, but have been taking it all in. And more thoughts on the subject are appreciated!

La Tortue, I ride with several recumbent riders, so I'm well acquainted with that concept, but for a number of reasons, haven't really been looking in that direction, either. On yesterday's ride, we had two recumbent riders; one is headed out to Sebring again in a bit, the other was saying he just picked up a new Rans Rifle.

On the frame-vs-complete bike, the biggest problem I face is very limited knowledge of which components are better than which, and by how much, which are compatible with which, etc. I've got friends that'll pick what they like off Ebay ahead of time and get the bargains, and build a bike up from it, but they know what they like, and what year model is good, what is bad, etc. If I built a bike up from a frame, I'd just basically go to my bike shop and say "What do I need here?" and take it from there. For what it's worth, my Raleigh Sojourn has Shimano 9-speed stuff, the tandem has Shimano 10-speed, both are okay, neither is perfect. So I'm not too picky there.

Homeyba, by "aero helmet", do you mean the time trial helmets, or just a helmet that is more aero rather than less (I wasn't aware there was a big difference once you got away from the TT helmets.)
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-14, 02:38 AM   #18
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Stephen, I was talking about a full on TT helmet like the ones in the picture above. They make a huge difference. Whether you get a frame and build it up or buy something used off ebay (or whatever) I would suggest you stick with Ultegra level components. It's the best compromise between cost and performance (IMHO) I would also suggest 10sp as 9sp stuff is becoming harder to find. If you find a complete bike with 9sp, that's ok.
Homeyba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-16, 11:49 AM   #19
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Just revisiting this thread, and still appreciating the good advice above! I never did replace my bike, but that Sojourn is about at the 50,000 mile mark now, so still considering similar upgrades as discussed above. And I've recently shed some weight, which makes such things as upgraded bikes and aerobars more practical.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-16, 08:42 AM   #20
DennyV
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Sayre, Pa
Bikes: Orbea Onix Tour De France, Easy Racer Tour Easy. Bacchetta Giro 26, Giro 20, Catrike Road, Cannondale Mt bike, Peugeot PSV-10 Vintage racing bike.
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I'm a 12 hour ultra racer Usually weighing in around 240 pounds. I ride a 2009 Orbea Tour De France Carbon bike. I converted from recumbents, in 2009. The biggest factor IMO with endurance racing is bike fit. Additionally saddle comfort is key. I went to a Brooks B17 a couple of seasons ago, and the difference in comfort is very noticeable. Making the bike reliable is also important. Selecting a durable tire that rolls well can save you lost time in tire repairs during a race. Along that same line I've found riding a bit heavier wheel with 36 spokes and wider tires, 25mm at least will keep you out there. Staying on the bike and moving forward, will result in much better average speeds, and more total miles. 10 minutes to fix a flat equals 3 miles in a 12 hour race. TT bars do help, but only if you can stay in them for long periods of time and have them adjusted properly. I favor Airstykes as the spingloaded arm cradles allow me to ride with my hands on the top of the bars if I need to, A Carbon bike is nice though, and while there are drawbacks, the ride is really good. Even just having a carbon fork on an aluminum frame makes a world of difference.
DennyV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-16, 09:30 PM   #21
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Richard Cranium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Deep in the Shawnee Forest
Bikes: LeMond - Gunnar
Posts: 2,829
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Right now, I'm running maybe 230 lbs at 6'-2"
Most bike shop sales people will know what you need. I don't believe that "long distance" bicycles exist. However, the right bicycle for a particular section of road or event DOES exist.

Do what make sense for you - but my advice is to pay extra attention to tire/wheel selection and max possible pressure for safe completion of the event....
Richard Cranium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-16, 09:15 PM   #22
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Okay, looking at this a little more...
A couple of brands that one of the local shops handles are Cannondale and Specialized. In both cases, I see they have lines of bikes with "racing" theme (Tarmac, Supersix Evo) and bikes with "comfort/endurance" theme (Roubaix, Synapse Carbon).
-How much difference in performance is there, really?
-Will either option work fine with aerobars? I'm assuming the "comfort" options have slightly higher handlebars, is that good or bad for that application? Are the "racing" options any twitchier in handling?
-Now, for a lot of riding, a tube or two and a CO2 cartridge in one of those little seat bags is about all you need. But, for a 200k in cold weather, you wind up toting several layers and corresponding lot of bulk. I've seen one or two guys with the seatpost mounted cantilevered racks just crammed full (and have seen those come loose, too!). With that in mind, does that affect the choice of bicycles used, or does it just mean you use the ol' trusty steel steed with Carradice bag when the going gets tough?
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-16, 11:07 PM   #23
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 11,217
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
My favorite long distance bike is a '99 Trek 5200 with aerobars. Definitely start with a road bike. Aerobars are tremendously comfortable if set up properly. Mine are Syntace FWIW. I like the pads aft of the bars. Supported only by your bones, you just make your feet go 'round. Nothing to it. You'll just have to ride different bikes and pick the one that damps best, though you'll have to allow for differences in wheels and tires and pressures. PBP bans aerobars of course, so there's that. But otherwise it's all good. They take a little getting used to, but that's just a matter of riding with them a lot. I have little rules: no hard cornering on the 'bars, nothing technical, stuff like that. Our tandem is set up with dual aerobars. That's really fun.

You just want the amount of forward lean that's comfortable for you over long distances. I suspect an "endurance" bike would be fine, but probably anything would work, set up correctly for you. I'd look at grand tour geometry, too. Those folks like a bike that takes as little energy as possible to control.

I use an Ortleib bag, which carries enough for me. No, no Carradice! I've seen people use very light backpacks for extra clothes but not done that myself. Arkel makes a nice seatpost rack and randonneur bag for it. Quite light and aero, a good choice. I have one of those, too, for riding into unknown conditions.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-16, 08:56 AM   #24
clasher 
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Bikes:
Posts: 1,913
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
I know it's a small sample but I just picked up a used '11 roubaix, and I shod it with vittoria open corsa tires in 28mm. My steel road bike has the same tires in 25mm. I have only ~200km on the bike so far but I've been doing the same 50km loop I do a lot and it's been easier and faster than it was on the steel bike. I'm in worse shape than I was last year doing the same loop so I guess the 5lbs or whatever difference there is in weight might be a factor, or I'm just excited with my new bike. I've managed similar speeds on my steel bikes but that was when I was in better shape... lots of variables so I don't wanna say it was 'cos of the carbon. I can ride my roubaix no-hands just as easily as I can all my other bikes and it doesn't seem twitchy at all but I've never really ridden any bikes that are considered twitchy so I've got little to offer in the way of comparison.
clasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-16, 11:30 AM   #25
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
What I normally have on the bike in the summer is "The Sharon Bag", a J and D Mountain Wedge or something like that- a pretty room bag that mounts to the saddle without any hardware. It'll hold a fair bit of stuff, even a spare tire, but what it won't hold is 2 extra layers of wool jerseys and tights that you peeled off when it went from 30 degrees to 70 degrees. That's where the Carradice bag comes in!

Carbonfiberboy, which size/kind of Ortlieb bag are you referring to?
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:54 AM.