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  1. #26
    Senior Member
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    I lived on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi for 10 years or so. When I first moved there, after a lifetime in the northeast, (N.Y. and Rhode Island) I thought I would die of the oppressive heat and humidity which were 93 degrees F and 93% humidity day in and day out. I began to get used to it after a year or two and reached the point where I could play tennis all afternoon long. The trick for me was to drink plenty of water, about one liter per hour which poured right out. In the mean time, friends who were born and raised in that environment would barely produce bit of moisture on their brow while I was drenched. If I played a tournament, an event lasting the entire week-end, I drank plenty of water even the day before the first match. One can do the best one can to keep cool but there is no substitute for acclimation. Glad it worked out well for you.

  2. #27
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    the downside of ice socks is the potential for saddle sores when the water drips down your shorts. My preference is to keep myself cool from the inside
    The last three weekends, I've been completely sweat-soaked the whole ride, so water dripping down my shorts would just be fresh water instead of salty water. (Usually, drips more on the front of my thighs than anywhere. I've only used an ice sock two or three times.)
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  3. #28
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
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    Jun 2013
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    Garner, NC 27529
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    If it's real hot, I'll pour some water out the camelback onto my thighs, soaking the bike shorts... It'll run down into my sandals... wind on cold water does wonders.

    I'll also freeze part of the camelback, like some others mentioned.

    Tried squirting through vents, you can't do so much that it gets to your shorts. Shoulder sleeves works good too...

  4. #29
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2003
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    SOMA Grand Randonneur, Gunnar Sport converted to 650B, Rivendell Rambouillet, '82 Trek 728, '84 Trek 610, '85 Trek 500, C'Dale F600, Burley Duet, Lotus Legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    it's amazing how effective ice is at keeping you going comfortably. After years of resistance, I started wearing a hydration pack with I fill with ice at every opportunity. I got tired of running out of water on hot days and the ice helps a lot with keeping hydrated. Nothing worse than being dehydrated and not wanting to drink because the water you are carrying is hot. You can do the same with water bottles. I use insulated water bottles for the same reason.

    I suppose it is possible to drink too much water and need electrolytes, but I generally get that by eating.


    It's light out at 6:30 nowadays. I think I would rethink the start time. eta, I didn't realize we are 40 minutes ahead of you on sunrise
    A similar strategy without the hydration pack is to just take a one-gallon plastic bag, fill it halfway with ice, and tuck it into the top of your jersey on top of your shoulderblades. I made myself a little mesh pack that lets me do this, but also lets me move the ice around more easily.

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