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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 08-20-14, 08:14 AM   #1
Caliper
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Frame bags?

I seem to remember as a kid seeing a lot of frame bags sold for bikes. Something that attached to the top tube and seat tube but still allows two bottles to be carried on the frame and still use my DT shifters. It seems like there is a fair amount of out-of-the-way storage that could be had here, but there doesn't seem like there are many options out there for this style of bag any more. Is there something I'm missing that this doesn't work well? Any places that sell a nice bag of this type that doesn't break the bank?
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Old 08-20-14, 08:58 AM   #2
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One reason you might not see them as much on road bikes is that modern road bikes often have much wider, shaped tubes and a sloping top tube, so there's a lot less space inside the main triangle, especially if you still want to get at the water bottles. Also, the shape of the main triangle is much more variable.
But they've gotten fairly popular with the "bikepacking" crowd, for packing stuff onto mountain bikes when panniers would be impractical for various reasons. Look up Revelate Designs, for example; I think Jandd also makes one.
Another thing to keep in mind is that if you like cranks with a narrow Q-factor, or you tend to pedal with your knees fairly close to the middle, you may not like using a frame bag much because your knees will hit it (that was my experience, anyway). If you're using a triple crank, long BB spindle, etc, it may not be a problem.
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Old 08-20-14, 09:38 AM   #3
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https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...log/Frame-Bags

The Revelate gas tank bag sits on the toptube up next to the stem is is very good for food and other small stuff used during the ride.
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Old 08-21-14, 08:27 AM   #4
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One reason you might not see them as much on road bikes is that modern road bikes often have much wider, shaped tubes and a sloping top tube, so there's a lot less space inside the main triangle, especially if you still want to get at the water bottles. Also, the shape of the main triangle is much more variable.
Yeah, hadn't thought about all the swoopy tube shapes out there. I've got a 25" traditional frame, so plenty of space in the upper rear area of the frame.

I'd found the Revelate Designs Tangle bag, and it would work great with ergo shifters but looks like it would block my DT shifters, or at least force me to use left hand/left lever, right hand/right lever which would be a pain. Same with the Jandd bags as they occupy the front corner of the frame. May have to consider one of those on my MT bike though...

I did find this on ebay: Ibera Bike Medium Triangle Frame Bag for Bike Tube Frame Quick Access New FB1M | eBay Looks like it may be the ticket with some modification to clip off the bottom corner of the bag and clear my rear bottle.

I guess this lack of selection is why I see so many handlebar bags out there?
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Old 08-21-14, 08:51 AM   #5
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there is no way I could use a frame bag because I can't stand to hit anything with my knees when I pedal. I'm sure I'm not alone in this, and I'm sure it limits their popularity
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Old 08-21-14, 10:04 AM   #6
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I'd found the Revelate Designs Tangle bag, and it would work great with ergo shifters but looks like it would block my DT shifters, or at least force me to use left hand/left lever, right hand/right lever which would be a pain. Same with the Jandd bags as they occupy the front corner of the frame. May have to consider one of those on my MT bike though...

I did find this on ebay: Ibera Bike Medium Triangle Frame Bag for Bike Tube Frame Quick Access New FB1M | eBay Looks like it may be the ticket with some modification to clip off the bottom corner of the bag and clear my rear bottle.

I guess this lack of selection is why I see so many handlebar bags out there?
I have a Revelate tangle bag, unfortunately I can't speak to DT shifters as both my bikes are ergo. Just looking at where the bag sits on my Randonee I'd say it'd be cutting it close for DT shifters. Their bags are bulletproof though, so if you decide to go the frame bag route I'd say a big +1 for Revelate.
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Old 08-21-14, 10:20 AM   #7
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There is a lack of selection because of the aforementioned limitations. I would not put a bag into the diamond as Unterhousen gaves good explanation for this problem. Top of the top tube works fine for me. Rando Richard sells some good stuff for the top of the top tube espcially his brevet bag, it gets high marks from plenty of riders and it is really inexpensive and is a thoughtful design. I could easily tour cross country with a top tube bag, a handlebar bag, and the big Revelate seat bag and maybe not even the HB bag. I have them all including multiple front and rear pannier sets. Only thing I don't have is a frame pack that fits inside the triangle. Why anyone would give up the space needed for the water bottles and knees while pedaling is beyond me. Just a bad idea.

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Old 08-21-14, 02:51 PM   #8
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I use a Deuter frame bag. It work perfectly on my bike. Was pretty cheap. It's not exactly waterproof, nevertheless I don't put anything in it that cannot get get. Here's the link;

Front Triangle Bag - Bike -Accessories - Rucksäcke & Backpacks by Deuter - USA

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Old 08-22-14, 07:59 PM   #9
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Why anyone would give up the space needed for the water bottles and knees while pedaling is beyond me. Just a bad idea.

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Don't worry, I wouldn't give up a bottle! With a 25" frame, I've got 6" from the TT to the top of the rear bottle (a normal one, not a shorty). Haven't checked knee space though, that could be annoying.
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Old 08-24-14, 10:23 AM   #10
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Going with the idea of giving up a water bottle... I actually put a 70oz Camelbak bladder in the right side pocket of my Tangle bag and still had room in the other side for some food, wallet, phone, etc. I run the hydration tube through the port at the front of the bag and clip in on to my map holder or top tube bag. There's a picture floating around BikeFo that illustrates it pretty well. I actually increase the water capacity on the bike and, if I'm really feeling thirsty, I can still fit a 24 oz bottle on the DT if needed on my 59 cm frames. I manage to do all of this without banging my knees on the bag, and my legs aren't exactly "skinny" either.
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Old 08-26-14, 06:23 PM   #11
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I use a Revelate Tangle on a 58cm road bike frame, and did not lose bottle access. You would however lose DT shifter access, and a bare rear brake cable might be problematic. I ride SS, with fully housed brake cables, so no issues there.

On the knee rub, it was totally unnoticeable on the tangle when seated, and the only time I remember my leg rubbing it was on some hill climbs with a lot of standing and heavy bike movement. And I ride with my knees close to the top tube.

It is an incredibly well thought out bag.
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Old 08-26-14, 07:50 PM   #12
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A triangle bag like the aforementioned Deuter can be mounted in the front corner of the frame (between the head tube, the down tube and the top tube) and that solves the problem of hitting it with your knees. The downside is that there's less room for the bottle on the downtube. I have a size 54 frame and I have to use a side-entry bottle cage, otherwise I couldn't get the bottle in or out with the frame bag in place.
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Old 08-27-14, 07:34 AM   #13
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a frame bag is generally as wide as bottles (or less), if you don't overstuff it. i can stuff the full frame bag full of crap on my Fargo and not hit my knees. same goes for the IF when running a bladder in the bag, and that bike as a TA crank and much lower Q than the Fargo. especially on the tangle, theres only so much fabric there to spread out, and the tighter you fasten the top row of velcro, the harder it is to puff up.

Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr

i plan on making a tapped piece of aluminum to slide the DT bottle down. i'll use that for anything that would be flavored, and run only water in the bladder.

Revelate Tangle on the IF. by mbeganyi, on Flickr

peek at the bladder

Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr



here's the full frame bag on the fargo.

yard sale by mbeganyi, on Flickr

getting ready to stuff it with trash, my water bladder filled from the spring, and left over food.
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