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  1. #1
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Wheels Questions

    Iíve got a 2015 Cannondale Synapse 5 Disc 105 (Aluminum) that I have really been enjoying with totally stock components. I just started cycling seriously last spring on my mountain bike and picked up this Synapse around last September.

    Iíve been smashing personal records on Strava segments around here and picked up a KOM last fall and over the weekend I landed a 5th place and a pair of 8th places on my 61 mile ride. I beat out local Ďproí riders (they ride on sponsored teams so I supposed that qualifies as Ďproí right?). Iím guessing these guys are riding big money carbon fiber race bikes Ė so, Iím pretty stoked to place even if itís not the KOM.

    Iím really mostly interested in longer distance riding. Possibly participating in centuries or gran fondos this year. I donít think Iím out to win anything, but just possibly enjoy completing them with respectable times at best.

    My question regarding wheels is with this in mind. I know very little about wheels quite frankly. Iíve been checking them out. I think Iím pretty sure I donít care about tubulars and Iím not sure that carbon fiber wheels are well suited to my budget and purpose. Iím frankly not entirely sure that there is a big point to upgrading for what it might cost. I might see the benefit of better hubs and my Strava segments might improve if I had lighter wheels/bike, but itís not a huge deal. I bought a trainer recently and a spare set of wheels would be really handy for that (using my old wheels).

    I obviously need wheels to accommodate disc brakes which probably limits the selection. Are there suggestions based on goals of longer distance riding? Durability, etc. These would be my full time riding wheels I suppose for training and any organized events.

  2. #2
    Gear Combo Guru Chris_W's Avatar
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    Shimano RX830 and Mavic Ksyrium Pro Disc are two wheelset options that I would consider. I expect that these would drop between 200 and 400 grams compared to the stock wheels. To go lighter, you'd need to spend quite a bit more money for carbon rims, etc.

    If your current total weight of rider, bike and gear is 80 kg, and the new wheels are indeed 400 grams lighter (which is at the upper limit) then that would be a 0.5% reduction in total weight. Therefore, your speed when climbing an incline steep enough to make gravity the only important factor will increase by 0.5%; on any inclines in which aerodynamics still plays a role (i.e., anything less than about a 10% incline) then the speed increase will be more minor that this.

    So, assuming you currently have a 10 minute PR on such a steep climb, then with the lighter wheels you could be 3 seconds faster. WOW! (600 seconds x 0.5% = 3 seconds). It's up to you to decide whether or not this is worth the cost.

    If the average gradient of the climb is more in the region of 5% then aerodynamic resistant will be a far more important factor, so if you can get a more aero rim than you currently have then this could make more of a difference than something lighter. Unfortunately, aero differences are far harder to quantify than are weight differences, which is partly why everyone puts so much focus on weight.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply. I'm still trying to study up on 'upgrade' wheel sets. I'm not sure I'm ready to commit to the price of them. Is this the bike that I want to make that kind of commitment to, etc. Disc brake wheels not being as easily transferable to another bike is something to consider too. If I can't convince myself to commit to the higher priced options is it even worth considering for a more entry level 'upgrade' over my stock wheels. Like the Aksium possibly? I see these are the stock wheels on the higher end versions of my bike. They probably aren't much lighter. My bike is never really going to be 'light' anyway for that matter - it's aluminum. It currently weighs in right at 24lbs riding weight - less my water bottle. So, about 25lbs total riding weight with all the junk in my bag - including my phone that I ride with.

  4. #4
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    If you want new wheels, buy new wheels. But chasing weight and speed on a 24 pound bike is pretty pointless, especially when your measuring stick is Strava.

    If you want to go faster, you should buy a book on training or hire a coach, and train. Start with then engine, not the equipment.

    No, riding on a team with sponsor logos on the kit does not mean one is a pro.

    If you want to know how fast you are compared to the fast people in your area, pin on a number and race. Strava is pretty meaningless.
    ...

  5. #5
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    If you want new wheels, buy new wheels. But chasing weight and speed on a 24 pound bike is pretty pointless, especially when your measuring stick is Strava.
    Iím simply asking for input from more experienced cyclists about my personal situation when the mantra seems to be that wheels are the first thing to upgrade. I concur that I question if there is a point to expensive super light wheels on a bike that is never going to be light no matter what. Thatís why Iím asking around beyond the bike shop that will want to sell me wheels and make up reasons.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    If you want to go faster, you should buy a book on training or hire a coach, and train. Start with then engine, not the equipment.
    Iím 43 years old. Iíve gone from weighing 270lbs a few short years ago to 160lbs last summer. Cycling helped me to drop 40lbs last year to get to 160lbs (Iíve gained back a few in the winter months). Iím not really sure a lecture on me needing to start with my fitness is necessary from you. I rode an over 7 year old entry level mountain bike for the majority of the year last year before I felt like I earned myself a new road bike at the end of the summer.

    My average speeds on my rides and segment times on Strava have improved dramatically since getting the road bike. I donít know how that factors into your equation of the equipment not mattering.

    I picked up a Garmin Performance Bundle recently and an indoor trainer. I do intend to attempt to start becoming a little more scientific about my training efforts. I wouldnít consider that this *equipment* is necessarily frivolous in an attempt to get more serious about training and/or maintaining my fitness through the winter.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    No, riding on a team with sponsor logos on the kit does not mean one is a pro.

    If you want to know how fast you are compared to the fast people in your area, pin on a number and race. Strava is pretty meaningless.
    Iím not sure what your personal bias is against Strava. I guess that you race a lot and anyone who doesnít race as much as you isnít really serious, worthy, or whatever IDK. I personally find it very motivating to see improvements gauged by personal records being broken and placing in the rankings on segments that are beating out what I have possibly improperly classified as Ďpros.í

    The individual that I apparently displaced on my best recent placement was a ĎCat 2í road cyclist as he lists himself. I consider that to be a significant achievement if he or the others qualify technically as Ďprosí or not. They DO participate on Strava so I have to assume that they made their best effort on those segments to have placed where they placed. They are on racing teams (one of these guys is the team manager of his team and the local Pro-Am Race Director Ė whatever that means). I presume based on that they would take their placements fairly seriously if they participate. I beat their all-time best times on a bike that weighs in probably over 25lbs riding weight and Iím about 15lbs heavier than my best weight last summer when I could have stood to lose another 5-10lbs to really be getting fit. On a winter day wearing winter weather gear. Yes, Iím pretty proud of that!

    I seriously doubt that everyone starts out racing nor does everyone even care about racing at all. I wouldnít have chosen an endurance bike if I were interested in Ďracingí in what I might consider the more traditional sense of it. I believe I pretty clearly stated that my main goal was to possibly participate in a few centuries and/or gran fondos and simply complete them with respectable times. I donít intend upon pitting myself against the fastest people involved to see if I can beat them over a full race course. I might be surprised if I continue to improve though. I may gain more of an interest in competing.

    I might also enjoy seeing my Strava segment placements improve. It motivates ME. It might not mean a lot to YOU, but I didnít ask for YOUR opinion on the validity of what Strava represents to ME.

    If new wheels might help me to achieve my goals then I might like to hear suggestions from more experienced riders if they would be worth the money and what options would be the best choice. I do appreciate the suggestions given already.

  6. #6
    Dharma Dog lhbernhardt's Avatar
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    If you're upgrading wheels to be used on a bike equipped with disc brakes, then you definitely want carbon fiber rims, just for the weight advantage. You can get decent carbon fiber clinchers. If you were using rim brakes, then I would have advised against cf rims, as you need special rim pads, and they make horrific sounds under braking, and you wear out the expensive rims. Disc rims will last forever, or at least until you hit a monster pothole or an immovable object.

    I wouldn't take Strava too seriously. Just because they're on Strava doesn't mean they're attacking all the KOMs. When I was racing years ago, I only ride at maximum during races, or during the heavy parts of my training. Normally I'd be recovering, so I'd get passed by all sorts of dudes. It's more typical that racers would be going up a hill with their teammates, and they'll be shooting the breeze with each other, but their time will appear to be a racing time just because they're so fit, but they've only got the Garmin turned on so that later they can see where they went on Strava with the nice maps (and what their power output looks like at this time of year), not because they're trying to win KOMs. Also, unless they're doing the early-season Euro races, not too many racers are going to be going that hard in January. Right now they are building an endurance base in order to peak for the big races starting in May.

    As has been posted, the only way you can really tell just how fast you are is to just get in a real race, or just ride with real racers. And the advice to work on the engine first didn't sound to me like "lecturing." After you've been at this for a few years (I've been riding for well over 40 years now, and I'm in my 60's), it's quite common knowledge that the bike counts for very little, compared to the rider's fitness. You can upgrade the equipment all you want, but if you think about it, unless you only pull out the lightweight equipment for the big events, you are only making it easier for yourself when you train. The net result is that training on lighter stuff actually makes you slower because you don't have to work as hard to go the same speed. Again, in order to push yourself (faster speeds), you pretty well have to get out there with the faster riders.

    Also, be aware that Strava resets each year. Without even trying, I found myself in possession of various KOMs in early January. By now I'm sure I'm at around 150th for most of the climbs, but I don't even look at that stuff. Forget to turn off the Garmin, put your bike on the rack, drive up the hill, and you've altered the KOM structure for that climb!

    Luis

  7. #7
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    Congratulations on your weight loss. That's really impressive!

    I'm not trying to be a jerk. None of your ideas about self motivation were in your original post. I'm all for you being motivated however you want to be. For me Strava is not motivating, but if it is for you, great. Really. It never even occurred to me that one would compare ones own rides on strava to track improvement. I have other tools I use for that, and I thought the whole point of strava was comparing with other people.

    Your original comments were about comparing yourself to others and concluding you were fast compared to some people who are "pro" - and I just don't think you can draw that conclusion - and I say that knowing NOTHING about you- it's a comment about strava, not about you. You can't compare across conditions. what if you have a 20mph headwind and someone else did it on a different day with a 30mph tailwind? that's why i find strava meaningless.

    I think I heard you say you wanted new wheels because you wanted to be faster. I read "complete gran fondos and centuries in respectable time" to mean that you want to go faster, was I mis-reading that? Wheels aren't going to make you much faster. Training could make you significantly faster.

    I would agree with your own statement "I’m frankly not entirely sure that there is a big point to upgrading for what it might cost." I just don't see what problem you are trying to solve with new wheels.

    If you just want new wheels, get new wheels, nothing wrong with that.

    But i think most experienced cyclists would agree that your fitness is the first thing to upgrade, not equipment.
    ...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    Congratulations on your weight loss. That's really impressive!
    Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    I'm not trying to be a jerk. None of your ideas about self motivation were in your original post. I'm all for you being motivated however you want to be. For me Strava is not motivating, but if it is for you, great. Really. It never even occurred to me that one would compare ones own rides on strava to track improvement. I have other tools I use for that, and I thought the whole point of strava was comparing with other people.
    ? The paragraph that introduced any mention of Strava started out ďIíve been smashing personal records on Strava segments around here.Ē I donít routinely place in the top 10 of any of the segments that I cross, but I do routinely note the improvement when I achieve a ĎPersonal Recordí on segments that I have previously crossed and find it motivating. This is a pretty universal purpose people find in the use of Strava I would imagine. Not a unique concept to me. Possibly one of the reasons it is so very popular.

    It frankly sounds to me like youíre not particularly familiar with how Strava works for tracking your training, etc. I think itís pretty cool myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    Your original comments were about comparing yourself to others and concluding you were fast compared to some people who are "pro" - and I just don't think you can draw that conclusion - and I say that knowing NOTHING about you- it's a comment about strava, not about you. You can't compare across conditions. what if you have a 20mph headwind and someone else did it on a different day with a 30mph tailwind? that's why i find strava meaningless.
    I believe you are exaggerating my position in my statements. Itís called a Ďstraw maní argument when you propose that I hold a position that I donít really hold and then defeat that position or argument.

    I believe the argument that you are trying to propose was my positon is that I am Ďfasterí than these guys in every capacity and I should Ďpin on a number and raceí and they can show me how much slower I am than them.

    I simply noted that I was very enthused to have beaten a number of local top cyclists on a few segments that I have previously crossed. The Ďconditionsí were that these were *All Time* records for *All Ages* Ė these records reach back for *YEARS* and Iím sure cyclists have crossed these segments under every imaginable weather condition. They could have been out there the day I was riding and taken advantage of the same riding conditions. My 8th place segments actually fell to 10th place the very same day because Iím sure the tailwind was a huge benefit on those segments to anyone riding that day. You can trust that it wasnít the only day of *All Time* that there were similar conditions. Did every rider face the very same conditions? No. If they cared anything about their rankings they could have gotten up and been out there to take advantage of similar conditions. Just sayin. I was out there riding Ė I *deserved* whatever advantage I might have had.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    I think I heard you say you wanted new wheels because you wanted to be faster. I read "complete gran fondos and centuries in respectable time" to mean that you want to go faster, was I mis-reading that? Wheels aren't going to make you much faster. Training could make you significantly faster.
    I do plan to continue Ďtrainingí as far as putting in miles and becoming more familiar with intervals and how that might help me improve and use of my heart rate monitor and Ďzonesí as I understand a lot of training revolves around. This is all pretty new to me. I have previously simply been putting in miles.

    A new set of wheels means an old set that can be designated for the trainer and a new set for riding outdoors. It is one additional consideration. Yes, I can buy a cheap rear wheel and trainer tire to accomplish that. It might be a waste of money if a new set of wheels is something I should be considering anyway that might eliminate a *disadvantage* I have in accomplishing Ďrespectable timesí as a goal.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    I would agree with your own statement "Iím frankly not entirely sure that there is a big point to upgrading for what it might cost." I just don't see what problem you are trying to solve with new wheels.
    Iím obviously not 100% sold on the idea that itís money well spent. It is what almost everyone seems to believe is the best upgrade that you can make. I donít believe Iím coming up with this on my own.

    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    If you just want new wheels, get new wheels, nothing wrong with that.

    But i think most experienced cyclists would agree that your fitness is the first thing to upgrade, not equipment.
    Iím not by any means saying that I believe that wheels are the biggest obstacle to me being the best that I can be. I need to get my weight down and ride more and I did put in nearly 3k miles last year which I donít believe was a bad first year with the majority of it on a mountain bike with street tires.

    If there is a consensus of opinion that wheels are the best upgrade though and I know my bikeís wheels are probably on the lower end of the scale of entry level Ė then it must be worth considering what the options would be to best fit my goals that would keep me from having a *disadvantage* in achieving them.

    I know infinitely more about wheels now than I did a few weeks ago. I didnít really even know about tubulars vs. clinchers, tubeless, etc. before the last few weeks. There canít be much downside to becoming more informed about the activity that Iíve chosen to help improve my health - If I actually purchase new wheels or not.

    Improving my health to combat what I donít believe anyone might really easily be able to appreciate.

  9. #9
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    I for one, certainly wouldn't stop at wheels. If I really wanted to go faster, I'd get it all: best road shoes, Assos clothing, power meter, resistance rollers, trainer, 15 lb. bike, and hire a coach. Prioritizing, that's the hard part. Takes a good bit of experience to know how things rank in importance.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
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    I agree with Valygrl, if you want new wheels, just do it. But if you also want performance, get wheels that are more aero, to help you somewhat on the flats, and get some that are lighter, to help you somewhat on the climbs. Why not do these things?

    Personally, I don't care about Strava. I agree that training will do more for you than the equipment, but if cooler equipment motivates you (it does for me), then again, why not?

  11. #11
    Senior Member kingston's Avatar
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    I would only upgrade the wheels on that bike if I had some sort of problem with them at which point I would replace them with something more durable but not too expensive. Some flavor of Shimano hubs with Mavic Open Pro or Sport rims would be a sensible choice.

  12. #12
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
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    Everybody who rides regularly (and it sounds like you do) should have an extra set of decent wheels. They don't need to be super-fancy, and for the most part they won't make a lot of difference in your speed-- as several people have said so far, work on the engine. A pair of well build 20 to 28 spoke wheels will last you a while and be sufficient for almost anything you want to do.

    If you want to get faster, ride faster. It sounds silly, but it's true. Riding more won't make you faster, but riding faster will. Intervals are probably the best way to get faster-- you train yourself to go fast and recover, and gradually you can go faster with shorter recovery. You can do it on your own or with friends or a coach or something, but it's all about training the motor.

    As far as Strava - it seems like a reasonable way to track your own performance and compare your own rides, particularly since you know the conditions when you rode. Comparing to other people? It's silly, and I see a fair bit of stupid riding by people trying to get high up on strava. And as lhb and valygrl have said, people may not be riding for strava times, and may be riding far below their max because that's their workout for the day. I.e. if you want to compare your performance to other people, do it when you're both doing it - you'll find that many people who actually race have similar opinions about strava.
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  13. #13
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    I really hate that this thread turned into a debate about Strava - that wasn't my intent, but since it was attacked that I boasted of my pride in my *Personal Record* achievement and it has seemingly been attempted to be diminished by several people I'll post the segment in question. I'm frankly not sure how this will display if you don't have a Strava account or if it will be viewable at all period, but here are the details. It was a .8 mile segment. The guy that I displaced had a *measured* 388 watt output through the segment - he's got a power meter it's not an estimate. I don't have a power meter myself so I'm not really tuned in to what power meter numbers mean, but from my limited familiarity with them - 388 watts isn't what somebody just happened to trot through a segment on their daily workout ride to achieve.

    Why does everyone assume that I was the only one who actually targeted this segment to see how well I could do and *everyone* else was just out on a casual training ride? I rode over 61 miles that day myself. The guy that I displaced for example rode 11 miles total that day with what Strava calls a 'weighted average power' of 115 watts. My guess being that they took the actual measured wattage from his power meter and averaged it for his entire ride. I'm not super great with math, but it would appear to me that he busted his ass through that segment to be in 5th place before I came through with a pretty healthy effort on my part (reaching 173 beats per minute as a peak that I had achieved so far since getting my heart rate meter).

    https://www.strava.com/segments/2557508?filter=overall

    I routinely do simply go out and 'train' ride and cross segments that I know exist somewhere on the route, but I'm not necessarily solely looking to get my best time. I'm familiar with the idea of it, but this segment is nowhere near any routes that have multiple segments of that nature that somebody might just be making a half hearted effort to be training and happen to place in the top ten.

    I rocked out a 7th place yesterday on a 6.7 mile segment (with a nice tailwind - and a team rider got 4th under the same conditions yesterday) and I went on to complete the Strava Gran Fondo 150k Challenge (94.27 miles).

    Anyway, yes, my rear wheel has now broken two spokes in two weeks (another yesterday). The rear hub as a slight wobble that might be an issue. The route that I regularly ride has a few really super harsh pedestrian bridges where the lip of the concrete is like almost an inch of a sharp edge that is probably doing damage when hitting them at speed.

    I might lean toward a more affordable second set of wheels that might be a minor upgrade over my stock wheelset. Possibly the Mavic Askium One Disc. IDK really.

  14. #14
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Wow! Start a string asking for opinions, and get very defensive and argumentative.

    Kinda defeats the purpose, IMHO

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  15. #15
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Wow! Start a string asking for opinions, and get very defensive and argumentative.

    Kinda defeats the purpose, IMHO
    Do you catch it that my last response focused on how disappointed I was that my post asking for opinions about wheels turned into a string of *Opinions* that weren't solicited about Strava? Or are you just another, um one, who just wants to pop your mouth off? I certainly didn't solicit your opinion on how the thread took a turn for the worse debating the merits of Strava.

  16. #16
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    LOL. BTW, learn to bunny hop. And always stand when going over rough surfaces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Wow! Start a string asking for opinions, and get very defensive and argumentative.

    Kinda defeats the purpose, IMHO
    +1!! Sure quashed any interest on my part in contributing anything helpful.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
    +1!! Sure quashed any interest on my part in contributing anything helpful.
    Glad that you took the time to chime in with that though...

  19. #19
    Senior Member Steamer's Avatar
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    My recommendation is to ask your question on a different sub-forum. The fact that you'd put these wheels on bike you'd use on a century or whatever is pretty much irrelevant to the typical topics of discussion here. That's why the scent testosterone wasn't met with particular approval.

  20. #20
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastfwd01 View Post
    Anyway, yes, my rear wheel has now broken two spokes in two weeks (another yesterday). The rear hub as a slight wobble that might be an issue. The route that I regularly ride has a few really super harsh pedestrian bridges where the lip of the concrete is like almost an inch of a sharp edge that is probably doing damage when hitting them at speed.
    Is it the same spoke or a nearby one? You may have a "flat" spot in the rim from hitting the concrete lip (or a pothole). When you get it replaced, go to someplace that actually measures tension when they true wheels and they can tell you if some of them are way off, which might mean rim replacement time.
    Track - the other off-road
    http://www.lavelodrome.org

  21. #21
    Senior Member headloss's Avatar
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    Strava, KOM, watt-output... je ne parle pas. I think @Steamer has a point. Not all cyclists pay any attention to that sort of thing.

    As for wheels,

    No reason not to upgrade, it's always a good idea to have an extra set anyways and wheels can be carried over to a future bike if you later upgrade to something similar. In the grand scheme of things, it's not throwing away any money (unless you never buy another disc brake bike).

    First thing you need to do is figure out what kind of hub/wheel you currently have. C'Dale lists it as Formula DC-1422 but I can't find such a hub on Formula's website. You need to measure the space between dropouts and determine if the OLD is 130mm or 135mm. Then maybe someone can suggest prebuilt factory wheels or a good custom build.

  22. #22
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
    My recommendation is to ask your question on a different sub-forum. The fact that you'd put these wheels on bike you'd use on a century or whatever is pretty much irrelevant to the typical topics of discussion here. That's why the scent testosterone wasn't met with particular approval.
    Yes, I think the Road Bike forum would be a good place to post this.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Fastfwd01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steamer View Post
    My recommendation is to ask your question on a different sub-forum. The fact that you'd put these wheels on bike you'd use on a century or whatever is pretty much irrelevant to the typical topics of discussion here. That's why the scent testosterone wasn't met with particular approval.
    This is the forum dedicated to 'centuries' and I presume that includes gran fondos - which is exactly why I asked it here. What considerations should be taken into account for longer distance riding specifically if any.

    I note that the 'scent of testosterone' that you claim set off the backlash over my brief - one paragraph mention of my Strava accomplishments was responded to by a female? who stated that I just wasn't *man enough* more or less to 'pin on a number' and race in an organized race (my first year of starting in cycling from a zero level of fitness). So, you might want to go back and actually read what has been exchanged before you try to place the blame at my feet.

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    Randomhead
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    There had to be a cutoff where long distance started, and that was agreed to be 100 miles. But really, 100 miles is not long enough to require special preparation. There is plenty of discussion of faster centuries in the road forum. If a rider does require special preparation to get to 100 miles, the general forum might be a better place to ask for help. Or possibly 50+, depending on the rider's age.

    I thought about getting some aero wheels for may rando bike when I was offered a special price on them. But I decided not to. I think if you regularly ride long distances, you will see more bad weather. This would argue somewhat against aero wheels. Other than aero, there is no difference in requirements for wheels for long distance, and no opportunity for speed increases. On long distances, the thing that will give you increased speed is reliability. Performance up to the point where it affects reliability is a difficult optimization problem. I recommend a high quality 32 spoke set of wheels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastfwd01 View Post
    ...I note that the 'scent of testosterone' that you claim set off the backlash over my brief - one paragraph mention of my Strava accomplishments was responded to by a female? who stated that I just wasn't *man enough* more or less to 'pin on a number' and race in an organized race (my first year of starting in cycling from a zero level of fitness). So, you might want to go back and actually read what has been exchanged before you try to place the blame at my feet.
    You are the one who won't let go of the Strava thing. Yes I'm a woman, in what way is that relevant? I never said or implied "man enough." I'm not going to talk to you about Strava any more.

    I changed my mind, though, about the wheels - if you are breaking spokes then something is going on and if they keep breaking after being repaired, you might want new ones, and relegate the old one to the trainer.
    ...

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