Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    My Bikes
    2013 Trek Domane 6.9+, 2009 Bianchi 928, 1972 Atala Record Pro
    Posts
    246
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need some perspective from the Masters

    I am 58, and have been cycling actively for the past four years. From a start of 2000 miles year one, I got up to right about 10,000 miles last year. I've never raced, even in my youth, when I was doing occasional club rides with some pretty fast boys and girls.

    Long story, but my daughter ended up joining a really cool fitness club last fall. I was sweating away on a spin bike, keeping her company a few weeks back, when one of the cycling coaches came by and described their metabolic testing and pedaling analysis programs. I mentioned it to my wife more as a curiosity than a desire, she whispered it in Santa's ear, he responded with a gift certificate, and low and behold, today was the day.

    Somewhat to my surprise, and to the coach's great surprise, I pulled some pretty high numbers, particularly on the VO2 max.

    I have heard from friends who do race that the Masters category is brutally competitive, much more so than Cat 4-5 in the general age group. So, and not looking to start a p contest of any sort, if you've got some recent metabolic test results and are willing to share, it would be a much appreciated dose of reality I suspect. A pm would be fine if you're the shy type.

    And yes, I do understand that there is a difference between lab results and the ability to race effectively. In the 40 minutes or so it took to run the test, my bike and the towel on the floor beside it covered exactly the same distance and earned the same prize.

  2. #2
    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Location, location.
    Posts
    11,708
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tigat View Post
    And yes, I do understand that there is a difference between lab results and the ability to race effectively.
    Welcome to the group. Good bunch of folks here, with a wide range of experience. No p-contest stuff. And the comment above is dead on the mark.

    V02 is a nice number to look at (fwiw I calc'd out low 80's high 70's at different times), as a maybe/potential indicator. It's also a moving target, and can be manipulated by drugs. And if you took the top pros with the most all time wins, most of them are sprinters with relatively anemic V02 ratings. Some of them don't even have spectacular peak wattage, unless they are track sprinters, the best of whom are hitting 150 % or more than the guys winning TDF sprint stages.

    On the other hand if you hit over 90 V02 and the test was right I will coach you for free That's a rare bird; Lemond, Bjerke, Waddell come to mind. Point 001 guys.

    Pedal analysis is an ink blot test. One guy comes to mind who has one of the uglier pedals strokes I've ever seen...like a guy chopping wood. He went to the Olympics.

    What's cool about the sport is it's not the number, it's when and how it's applied. Like poker, you can do pretty good with a garbage hand. It's also very cool in that your never too old to race, whether it's against the clock or banging elbows. Or both.

    Beware though, it's crack.
    Last edited by Racer Ex; 01-07-15 at 11:58 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member shovelhd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    My Bikes
    Yes
    Posts
    13,608
    Mentioned
    102 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Full disclosure: RacerEx is my coach.

    The strongest guy, the most genetically gifted guy, the most determined guy, none of those are predictors of race success. Sure, a freak or two comes along every year and rips through the lower categories and then hits the wall of their capability. The ones that continue to succeed at the highest level are rare. Most of us are not freaks, so we work our way up using all of the skills required to succeed at racing at the highest level. There is no single factor that can determine success.

    So why are you considering racing? What is inside that drives you to try it? Fun? Socialization? The challenge? Demons in your past? A boring life? Some or all of the above? Finding those honest answers will help you drive your expectations, and expectations are the most important part of the mental game of racing, which I consider to be significantly more difficult than the physical aspect. For me it's an order of magnitude more important. Not so much for beginning racers but as you gain more experience the importance increases.

    Quid pro quo. I started racing in 1981 while I was in college. I had ridden a drop bar bike for years as a kid and worked part time at a bike shop in Boston. I used to ride with a group of college kids at night and on the weekends. One of them was a Cat3 and encouraged me to race. I lapped the field in my first race for the solo win, and twice with another rider the next week for my second win. I was a Cat2 in two years and raced on one of the most dominant teams in the Northeast that spawned multiple National Champions and pros. Then I got burnt out and quit. For decades I noodled around on a bike but my race bikes gathered dust. In 2009 I had a cardiac event that turned out to be a false alarm, but it was a wake up call. I hit the gym and changed my diet. Running in the treadmill was killing my knees so I sold my vintage stuff and bought a race ready bike. I lost 35 pounds and returned to racing at age 52. I placed 12th in my first M45+ race and since then have won many regional and a couple of national races as a Master. What drives me? Staying in shape. I am naturally competitive and I am good at this sport. Winning, there's nothing like it. Beating people with stronger palmares and kids half my age. Sharing knowledge with new racers informally and formally through teaching clinics and mentoring. I am also a USAC official, which is a topic all to itself.

    Find what drives you, and you will find the answers. Best of luck and don't be a stranger.

  4. #4
    Senior Member IBOHUNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Western Maryland - Appalachian Mountains
    My Bikes
    Motobecane Fantom Cross; Cannondale Supersix replaced the Giant TCR which came to an untimely death by truck
    Posts
    2,858
    Mentioned
    39 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Racer Ex View Post
    Beware though, it's crack.
    Ain't that the truth!

    Welcome to the group. Not much more I can add to the above as I've only been on the bike as an adult for 3 years (minus the time I spent out medically) and my license will say 56 this year. I too had a wake up call of being WAY(!) overweight. Got a yard sale 26" bike and rode the wheels off it and my gut. Got a road bike and was told - you should race. Found out my fast twitch muscles are still in the rocking chair on the front porch and ability to recover from explosive efforts which are found in crits is/was not my cup of tea but I could do a TT type effort and I more than likely wouldn't be involved in a crash. Did OK last season in CAT5 TTs.

    I haven't done any formal VO2 stuff, only FTP tests to find what numbers I should train at

    If you want to race then a thumbs up; don't leave the earth wondering what might have been. Try all of the disciplines to see which you enjoy the most. You will be racing against CAT5 folks until you get the 10 mass start deal done then you get to race Masters which are just wiser versions of kids that are screaming fast.

    This is a phenomenal group and I get more out of it than I put into it. Hoping to turn that deal around one day.

    Don't be a stranger.

  5. #5
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Uncertain
    My Bikes
    2006 GIANT TCR, Kevin Winter custom road bike, Thorn Nomad, Kona paddywagon FG/SS
    Posts
    7,169
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't have any laboratory numbers, but I can offer some experience of what it's like to get into racing at your age - I was 57.

    I was, I thought, very fit. I didn't (and still don't) know my VO2 max but I'd been spending a lot of time on the bike for about seven years and I knew I was as strong as a lot of my riding companions who raced - some of them much younger than me. So one day, encouraged by a friend who is a coach, I took out a licence and pinned on a number.

    I'd been around races and bike racers a long time, but the intensity of that first experience took me by surprise. I found that, fit as I was, I couldn't hack it in a race. My immense base equipped me to hold a high, steady pace (if I could swim any better than a housebrick I'd make a great triathlete) but the race seemed to consist of nothing but a series of intense sprints separated by very brief rest periods. They spat me out the back in fairly short order and once gone, there was no coming back.

    So, I started training for racing. Intervals, tempo rides, more intervals. And I sharpened up my bike-handling skills. I hadn't been accustomed to making physical contact with other riders, and I suspect that takes a bit more getting used to when one starts so late. And before the end of the season I was hanging with the lead group in the non age-related Cat4 fields, though not winning anything - like IBOHUNT, sprinting is not my strength.

    Which is a long-winded way of echoing the fact that a high VO2 max is a terrific thing to have in terms of potential, but being race-fit, in every sense of the word, is a different matter.

    And I'd strongly support what shovel said about thinking about what drives you, what you'd like to achieve. Racing is hard and dangerous and intensely stimulating, lots of people find it addictive. I'm not really one of them. I started racing mostly out of curiosity about where I stood, fitness-wise, not out of any real urge to win. And once I had a measure of that and knew what it took to be competitive, and how to train with that in mind, I found I could take it or leave it as far as the actual racing was concerned. In a sense I didn't train to race, I raced to give myself a reason to train. So when in my third season my "career" was interrupted by injury, I wasn't motivated to get back to it. I still do most of the workouts I was doing for race training, though, and I'm extremely glad to have had the experience. I'd certainly encourage you to give it a try. The guys and gals in this forum are an unfailing source of information and encouragement, if you decide to do so.

    One more thing. There are some freakishly fast old guys out there.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  6. #6
    Ninny globecanvas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    The Gunks
    Posts
    2,533
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    tigat, if you've never raced, you won't be going up against the open masters for a little while. You have to start as a cat 5 even if you're 58. I've never seen a masters cat 1-5 field, and even if a race offered one, it's unlikely the fast masters would go anywhere near it.

    Some races might have age group cat 5 fields, like maybe a 50+ cat 5, where you can race against age group peers with similarly limited racing experience. After 10 races you can upgrade to cat 4, and by that point you will have hopefully enough experience to know whether you want to race with the big boys or not.

  7. #7
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    9,035
    Mentioned
    73 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome. What they said. Full disclosure. I am Morpheus let me show how deep the rabbit hole goes.

    Locally, we have the Stanford University human performance lab where they do VO2Max and lactate threshold testing either on their stationary bike or your own road bike in the lab with a mask on and blood samples taken and analyzed. And they will meet you on a local climb on the road and take blood samples as you do repeat climbs for 2X the price of the lab to calculate LT. And the woman who runs the lab used to be a member of our racing club and is an accomplished racer.

    At one point in time, I thought about going to Stanford but the cost of the test is high and one can get a great indication of fitness by using a power meter and doing testing following a protocol. As ones fitness changes, field tests confirm changes to the training program. After a few tests, one has paid for a power meter.

    Take the red pill and continue or take the blue pill and everything will be back to where you were before your post riding with the fast "boys and girls" and thinking you are fabulous.
    Last edited by Hermes; 01-17-15 at 11:08 PM.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

    Cat: Killer

  8. #8
    I need speed AzTallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    My Bikes
    Giant Propel, Cervelo P2
    Posts
    5,549
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've had metabolic testing three times. I initially used it to determine my HR zones. and while I train now train with a power meter, I still find the data from the test useful. The physiologist who has worked with our team is very focused on metabolism, and sees great value in HR data as a measure how hard you are going. He looks on the PM as more of a "tachometer". I take a different nutritional approach than most, and do all I can to burn fat rather than glycogen. My diet is low carb high fat, and I rarely eat anything prior to or during a training ride. The result is that, even after long layoffs the last couple of years, I've kept my Metabolic Equivalency Point (the HR at which you start burning more glycogen than fat) way up the chart. Aerobically, I've stayed fit with very little training. More fit (aerobically) than if I had taken a different approach, anyway.

    My last test was February of last year, and I had it done to assess the impact of my diet. My VO2 Max was 4.73 L/min, @ 360w. L/Min is the preferred measure, since VO2 Max is not directly related to your weight. My "MEP" was 138 BPM @ 210w, and my anaerobic threshold was 172 BPM @ 330w. I have a decent, but not extraordinary, VO2 Max. As has been said, there are far more important factors. Part of what I'm trying to do by pushing up my MEP is to save my glycogen reserves for when they are needed, at crunch time. There is a lot more that the nutritional approach offers (less lactate, less cell damage, quicker recovery) and all that seems to be working. I just haven't stressed it sufficiently because work and home life has made my training very sporadic. I don't know if my reduced glycogen stores will be a big limiting factor at the high end. Based on the training race a week ago, it's looking pretty good. I stayed in the lead pack despite my lack of training.
    "If you're riding less than 18 MPH up a 2% grade please tell people Coggan is coaching you."

  9. #9
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    9,035
    Mentioned
    73 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think OP should post his VO2Max and testing protocol.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

    Cat: Killer

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    My Bikes
    2013 Trek Domane 6.9+, 2009 Bianchi 928, 1972 Atala Record Pro
    Posts
    246
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hermes View Post
    I think OP should post his VO2Max and testing protocol.
    Fair enough, but what I was looking for was not a mine is bigger than yours event. There are a number of reasons I'm not thinking about throwing down in a competitive sense, not least of which is I ride one-handed, which greatly limits my ability to ride/sprint out of the saddle and I suspect would scare the **** out of someone caught along side me in a crit. That leaves time trials (no one to hurt except myself), but that's a bit of a stretch, literally and figuratively.

    I came here mostly to learn what bodies approaching their seventh decade are capable of doing with focused training, nutrition, and drive, none of which I've applied to date. I just ride.

    That said, the test was run on my personal bike on a trainer wearing a mask. Following about a 10 minute warm up, we started at 100w resistance and added 20w at every 2 min. interval. I went anaerobic at about 18 minutes and lasted another 7. If one of my kids was at risk, I might have been able to go on, but it sucked nonetheless. The experience gave me a whole new appreciation of what real racers do on a steady basis.

    At the end of the day, the VO2 max calculated to the low 60s. I figure with some interval training, I could run it up a bit from there, but I guess that means RacerEx is not going to coach me for free.

  11. #11
    Senior Member shovelhd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    My Bikes
    Yes
    Posts
    13,608
    Mentioned
    102 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There's a one armed racer from the Midwest named Joe Barenyi who is a world champion. Only two fingers on my left hand can reach the front brake lever yet I'm able to race and win. No stripes though. This is why I asked you what drives you.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    My Bikes
    2013 Trek Domane 6.9+, 2009 Bianchi 928, 1972 Atala Record Pro
    Posts
    246
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Don't know Joe but certainly know of him. In his early/mid 40s he was/is still kicking butt on both the track and the road. Those of you who haven't heard of him and are looking for a wow moment should look him up. Last time I checked, when he was doing fundraisers for his trip to London for the Paralympics, he still had a day job and limited sponsorship, which is a crying shame for an athlete performing at that level.

    What's driving me. Based on what I've seen, and obviously depending on the disability class, the elite Paralympians are performing at about 90% of their able bodied counterparts. I would not aspire to that nor would I ever consider taking a seat away from a younger athlete with upside, but if I was persuaded that a 58 year old body could still build the muscle and lung capacity to keep from being embarrassed, it might be fun to join the guys like Joe at Nationals some day. Hence I posed the question about what I might expect if I put in the kind of effort y'all do.

    Hat's off racing and winning with half a hand. I lost three fingers on my last hand to a table saw (reattached now but not working) and it had a big time negative effect on my bike handling, among other things.

  13. #13
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    9,035
    Mentioned
    73 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mass start racing requires the ability to get bumped and be very agile on the bicycle. If your disability limits that, then mass start racing is out no matter how powerful the rider. Time trials and hill climbs are different and may offer an opportunity for racing.

    Generally, people try a sport and see how they do and younger people seem to worry less about being embarrassed. I have never been embarrassed with an athletic performance. I have had poor results and many times thought I should have done better but at least I had results. Most people have no results.

    I love the idea of stealing the kids candy. A few years ago, one had to qualify to attend Elite Track Nationals. Each district could send 2 racers from each event. We held qualifiers at Hellyer and routinely our local 50+ strongman denied the one of the kids a place at elite nationals. Sorry.

    Lately, USAC has relaxed the prequalifying for Elite Track Nationals and I competed on year and attended a couple of races in which my wife competed. During Elite Track Nationals, they run the para track nationals. I am not sure where you get the 10% discount for the disabled but these guys were really fast. Just saying.

    BF gets lots of posts from cyclists that try to figure out if they should try racing. Usually, they post an average speed and ask if they are fast enough to race. There is nothing average about racing and it takes a lot of skill and time. I could name several very successful racers who won at elite nationals and had a slow start. Many athletes take years before they are able to compete effectively and some seem to advance rapidly.

    It is always about horses for courses and maximizing ones goals and genetics to events. I have no idea how you would do in the 7 decade or the first. Also, metrics such as VO2Max, FTP, LT HR and etc are not that relevant from athlete to athlete especially in cycling due to aerodynamics and body weight.

    Good luck with your cycling.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

    Cat: Killer

  14. #14
    Senior Member shovelhd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    My Bikes
    Yes
    Posts
    13,608
    Mentioned
    102 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nobody should ever be embarrassed after pinning on a number. Humbled, yes. It's very rare when you are the class of the field. That's happened twice in my long career. I won once and got worked over in the other, so much so I rode like an ass. My sole early season focus is to make that right this season. Anyway, I would encourage you to do your group rides in the early season and then make the call whether to get your license. If you do, we are here to support you.

    Hermes that was an awesome reply.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Tariffville, CT
    My Bikes
    Tsunami Bikes
    Posts
    13,552
    Mentioned
    51 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shovelhd View Post
    Nobody should ever be embarrassed after pinning on a number. Humbled, yes. It's very rare when you are the class of the field. That's happened twice in my long career. I won once and got worked over in the other, so much so I rode like an ass. My sole early season focus is to make that right this season. Anyway, I would encourage you to do your group rides in the early season and then make the call whether to get your license. If you do, we are here to support you.

    Hermes that was an awesome reply.
    +1

    As a race promoter I sometimes see some disappointed new racers, angry at themselves for not doing better, etc. I like to point out that no matter what happened that they're now a racer and their bike is now a racing bike. I remember that pain from when I started racing - I was sort of like the OP in that I was a new racer but in the Juniors instead of the Masters. I was 15 years old, I weighed less than 90 lbs, and one of the kids beating everyone up was a tall lanky kid from Long Island named George Hincapie. After George graduated to the National Team there was another kid named Frank McCormack - he and his little brother Mark would later dominate the domestic pro racing scene. And a slew of others that were some of the best in the country who had their hands full trying to handle George or Frank or Mark. For three years I lined up with these guys and it was absolutely devastating.

    Mass start racing is different from anything else. It's like sex (I can say that here, right?) or driving or playing in a band/orchestra. You can read about it, you can watch videos, you can practice on your own, but when you do it for real with other people it's something else. It's absolutely thrilling when things go well (even if you don't win - for me I'm thrilled diving into a corner in the field) and there's really nothing that anyone can do to explain how it feels. You just have to do it yourself.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  16. #16
    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Location, location.
    Posts
    11,708
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I got dropped so badly in my first race they called out cadaver dogs. What was worse was the dogs found me.

    For people who need their egos fed this is a horrible sport for most. If you like to engage in a process that provides years of learning, exploration, and a multiplicity of avenues for improvement it's pretty darn good. If you're really lucky, smart, and dedicated you might win or podium once in a great while. If not then the process is the reward, along with meeting some neat people along the way.

  17. #17
    Senior Member IBOHUNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Western Maryland - Appalachian Mountains
    My Bikes
    Motobecane Fantom Cross; Cannondale Supersix replaced the Giant TCR which came to an untimely death by truck
    Posts
    2,858
    Mentioned
    39 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    +1

    As a race promoter I sometimes see some disappointed new racers, angry at themselves for not doing better, etc. I like to point out that no matter what happened that they're now a racer and their bike is now a racing bike. I remember that pain from when I started racing - I was sort of like the OP in that I was a new racer but in the Juniors instead of the Masters. I was 15 years old, I weighed less than 90 lbs, and one of the kids beating everyone up was a tall lanky kid from Long Island named George Hincapie. After George graduated to the National Team there was another kid named Frank McCormack - he and his little brother Mark would later dominate the domestic pro racing scene. And a slew of others that were some of the best in the country who had their hands full trying to handle George or Frank or Mark. For three years I lined up with these guys and it was absolutely devastating.

    Mass start racing is different from anything else. It's like sex (I can say that here, right?) or driving or playing in a band/orchestra. You can read about it, you can watch videos, you can practice on your own, but when you do it for real with other people it's something else. It's absolutely thrilling when things go well (even if you don't win - for me I'm thrilled diving into a corner in the field) and there's really nothing that anyone can do to explain how it feels. You just have to do it yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Racer Ex View Post
    I got dropped so badly in my first race they called out cadaver dogs. What was worse was the dogs found me.

    For people who need their egos fed this is a horrible sport for most. If you like to engage in a process that provides years of learning, exploration, and a multiplicity of avenues for improvement it's pretty darn good. If you're really lucky, smart, and dedicated you might win or podium once in a great while. If not then the process is the reward, along with meeting some neat people along the way.

    If there isn't a top ten post list then there should be. These two are top 10 material and a great summary for new racers.

  18. #18
    Senior Member bbbean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Missouri
    My Bikes
    Giant Defy Composite 0, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima
    Posts
    1,002
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    ...I'd been around races and bike racers a long time, but the intensity of that first experience took me by surprise. I found that, fit as I was, I couldn't hack it in a race. ...

    ... but the race seemed to consist of nothing but a series of intense sprints separated by very brief rest periods. They spat me out the back in fairly short order and once gone, there was no coming back. ...

    ...Which is a long-winded way of echoing the fact that a high VO2 max is a terrific thing to have in terms of potential, but being race-fit, in every sense of the word, is a different matter.

    ...One more thing. There are some freakishly fast old guys out there.
    My experience mirrors his. After my first season of racing, I can finish in the pack with the cat 4s, but the Masters leave me so far behind that I just hope they'll send a postcard to let me know how things are at the finish line.

    Basically, Cat 4 and 5 are chock full of people learning how to race and/or weekend warriors who enjoy racing, have some skills, but aren't looking to set the world on fire. That's who you want to learn to race with. The Master's division is full of guys who've been racing for 10-40 years, have legs of steel, ridiculous skills, and have forgotten more about racing than you can know. They may look like a bunch of geezers at the starting line, but don't be fooled.

    Finally, it's been said several times already, but racing is about racing. Fitness helps, but it's no substitute for experience.

    BB
    Last edited by bbbean; 01-27-15 at 02:45 PM.
    www.beancotton.com
    Formerly Fastest of the Slow Riders, Currently Slowest of the Fast Riders



    http://veloviewer.com/athlete/2615827/

  19. #19
    Old Road Racer Cleave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    My Bikes
    Bicycle Transportation: 2013 Ford Focus Electric, 2010 Toyota Prius
    Posts
    5,068
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Guess I'll jump in. I've had the privilege of volunteering at a couple of para-athlete events at our local velodrome, the Velo Sports Center. Really amazing what people can do when they are inspired or motivated. When I was in my 20s (a long time ago), there was a guy who raced with me in Cat 3s who had one leg amputated(?) just above the knee. He had a prosthetic and did as well as I did in criteriums.

    I understand that riding with one hand in mass start races is a different story but time trials are fun and rewarding and you have an excuse to buy a lot of high tech aero stuff.

    For me, racing is about the sensations of speed that you don't experience during training, the race mentality that I crank up on race day, and challenging myself since I am not much of a challenge to my competitors. More simply, having fun and doing the best I can.
    Thanks.
    Cleave
    "Real men wear pink."
    See my cycling photos at http://www.pbase.com/cleavel/bicycling
    See my bikes at http://www.pbase.com/cleavel/mybicycles
    Visit my blog at http://cleavesblant.wordpress.com/
    Lightning Velo Cycling Club: http://www.lightningvelo.org/

  20. #20
    I need speed AzTallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    My Bikes
    Giant Propel, Cervelo P2
    Posts
    5,549
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are some great posts I this thread! Some things are unique. You just have to experience them.
    "If you're riding less than 18 MPH up a 2% grade please tell people Coggan is coaching you."

  21. #21
    Idiot Emeritus sarals's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Central Coast CA
    My Bikes
    2011 Prius Three, Specialized Venge, Felt B16, Look 566, Giant TCXW
    Posts
    4,538
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I almost gave up last year, my second (ever) full season. I'm a master's woman, 60+. Unique to women's racing, we have to contend with small fields, hence combining categories and/or age groups is the norm. The biggest thing I had to learn and accept was to not set my expectations too high, the kids are just stronger and longer lasting. That said, in this, my third season, I'm starting to figure this racing thing out and I am really enjoying myself. I am stronger this season, yes, but that's not the whole story, not by any means. What is the story is multifaceted, it is conservation, learning to relax, staying out of the wind, and riding smart. Nothing demonstrates the importance of those qualities better than pinning on a number, and getting out there, over and over. Don't be embarrassed, and don't be deterred. Learn to measure success in ways other than making the podium. You may like racing, you may become rabid about it....but you won't know until you give it and yourself an honest chance.
    Racer Ex..."Don't know if the shop is under new ownership. If not feel free to shoplift stuff and break bottles in his parking lot."

  22. #22
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    9,035
    Mentioned
    73 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Speaking of cycling and sex, here is an event that is more fun than a man should be allowed to have. This is probably my favorite cycling competitive event.

    2012 Olympics, team New Zealand practicing team pursuit. Guessing 37 mph, 700 watts off the front 450 w sitting in @ 120 rpm. Note the line they use around the track. They drift up to the red line in the straight and dive back to the black line in the turn. This allows one to carry more speed out of the turn. The olympians make this look really easy. It does take a lot of practice to get perfect especially at higher speeds.

    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

    Cat: Killer

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    My Bikes
    2011 Jamis Quest and 2014 Jamis Xenith Race
    Posts
    102
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry to steal this thread, but i do need some perspective from the Masters. I have been riding recreationally for over 4 years now and considered my self in good shape, but have never raced. I am 44 years old and just signed up for my first race, the Tour the Bloom Omnium. I figure I try three different styles of races and see what I like or do better at (or suck at)...My question is, should i get in the Cat 4/5 regular group or based on my age get in the Master 40 + Cat 4/5? I probably stay in the back and watch and learn...any recommendations?
    Thank you,

    Juan

  24. #24
    Senior Member shovelhd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    My Bikes
    Yes
    Posts
    13,608
    Mentioned
    102 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would suggest the M40+ Cat4/5, or a Cat5 only if offered. The Cat4/5 offers nothing more than the other two in terms of development.

  25. #25
    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Location, location.
    Posts
    11,708
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    My rule of thumb is race with age/gender/talent peer group when it's on offer.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •