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Old 12-19-02, 09:45 PM   #1
Hawkphoto
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My program feels like a digression?

Just started this new training program, and it calls for a preparation/adaptation period. OK. So, I'm down to humble myself and start where it's recommended for me to start at. Well, the first month of training is to be comprised of workouts in the "zone 1" and "zone 2" heartrates (based an individual lactate threshold testing - recall my anerobic threshold TT post). My L.T. is 165 BPM. So my zone spectrum is as follows:

Zone 1 <133
Zone 2 133-146
Zone 3 147-153
Zone 4 154-163
Zone 5a 164-167 (my L.T.)
Zone 5b 168-173
Zone 5c >173

So it's a base fitness training regime... That's fine, but it's also cross training season!!! I went to the gym and lifted upper body and some squats, and then hit the treadmill with a heart rate monitor. My intention was to stay within Zones 1 and 2...

Well, I found out that I like to run at my L.T.! I never really knew that before... If I push even a little bit harder, I get fatigued. But, if I go any easier, It's no longer running - more like uncomfortable jogging. And for me to be in the zone 1 or 2 that I should be in, I might as well be just WALKING!!! WTF?

It's not like I'm starting from scratch here... best shape I've been in, in 3 years! What should I do? Do I stick with the program word for word? Or do I adjust it to where "I think" I should be? Or, am I just reluctant to feel weak-ass?

I guess I'm just lost on the whole "you should cross train in the winter vs. don't you dare go over 147 BPM or you'll defeat the whole purpose of a training plan" !!! Any experiences would be greatly appreciated...

Peace,

Hawk
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Old 12-19-02, 10:07 PM   #2
dirtbikedude
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Just remember that everyone's training is going to differ be it a little or a lot. if you are already in shape you might have to make a few adjustments. The biggest concern is making sure you do not burn out or over train before the racing season comes.
What I find to be a good plan is to start off the season a little under peak form and then try to time it right so I start to peak around 2/3 of the way through so I will have more strenght and effort to carry me through were the others racers will be dying out.
It is a fine line because if you peak to early you will hate the end of the season and if you peak to late well, you loose.

Slainte
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Old 02-13-03, 11:21 AM   #3
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well, i'm not a pro, so take this as you will...

but although i have added more "base" training (meaning lower HR levels) to my training in the last years, i find that MANY programs call for like 50 or 60% or even more of your total training time to be way down in the lower zones...

while i think that it is VERY important not to OVERTRAIN and to get enough recovery (i.e. not hammer over-LT intervals 3 days in a row), i think you can do a lot more than what is suggested.

my LT is exactly the same as yours. when i do a "base" day that means taking it down a few notches, not doing the sprints and hammers i usually do --- this means i run in the 135 to 155 range which is much higher than what many of the plans call for for base.

like your comment above - when i go that low it's like i'm not even doing anything...

i do most of my training in the 135-155 range and then TRY to watch and monitor my LT, interval and race training so that i don't overdo it...
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Old 02-14-03, 12:29 AM   #4
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Yeah, I've been running "A LOT" lately and my heartrate has come WAY down on my runs. I'm anywhere from 155 to 169 while running at my 10 minute mile pace. I like to run on trails, so it goes up and down all the time. But, a couple months ago, to go the same speed I was at my LT. Now, I'm well below it. And, I'm pretty sure my LT is closer to 167 or 168 now.

I can't believe that I'm enjoying running so much. It's actually kept me off the bike for a while. Not good, but somehow refreshing. Although, after last weekend and my experience at Wilder Ranch in Santa Cruz on my Hardtail, I got back to my car with a smile on my face, and exhileration pumping through my whole body; helped me remember what "refreshing" is all about!

Can't wait for the season to start...

Mike
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Old 02-14-03, 04:37 AM   #5
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Quote:
this means i run in the 135 to 155 range
actually by "run" i was meaning cycling...

but i do actually run for x training, especially in the winter. i've done 10-12km runs each once a week the last few...

my HR for about a 8:30 to 9:00/mile pace is in the 150-165 range... then i get up in the 160-175 range when i do some intervals, sprints or hills (which i pretty much do on every run as i hate running on flat ground) i also like to run on trails, but there are more flat gravel paths here... and the real trails are pretty much burried in snow.

i'm getting in shape for adventure racing as well as a ski tour race in 3 weeks and for that the running training crosses over more than cycling.

cycling doesn't start here until March or really April although were doing an Italy MTB trip end of March like last year (Lake Garda!)

i've been back at the weights seriously as i like to do in the winter, but for mid-Feb i am pretty cardio fit, although not so bike strong (just not so many miles and hard training rides with the snow)
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Old 03-27-03, 08:43 AM   #6
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Where are you getting this training plan from? I tried one a while ago, but it only lasted a few days. The book I have only has three plans- beginner, intermediate, advanced. There's no way that everyone can fit into one of these plans, they don't take into account that some people need to work on endurance, some on sprinting, etc. I followed the schedule for a few days and then ditched it... I was just getting bored and overtrained.

Try the training plan, but if it doesn't feel right- put it away and train based on how you feel. If I get up in the morning with an elevated heart rate and sore legs, I make it an easy day. If I wake up fresh and full of energy, I'll do some sprints or a long endurance ride. Just make sure you listen to your body and vary your training, with extra focus on your weaknesses in the offseason.

Good luck!

Mike
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