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Old 04-18-05, 09:34 PM   #1
trekkie820
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To rigid or not...

...That is the question. I want more simplicity worked into my ride so I can get more cheap, trouble free years, but I ride some pretty technical trails. I am willing to subject my body to more pain at the expense of complexity, and I also feel that a Surly 1x1 is the way to go. Any insight into this would be great, hopefully from rigid users giving testimony.
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Old 04-18-05, 09:36 PM   #2
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i just switched over, i like it, and its retro and classly
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Old 04-18-05, 09:55 PM   #3
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I can dig a rigid, you should try a singlespeed too, that would decrease complexity. Of course now I notice your little sentence under your username, so maybe it already is.
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Old 04-18-05, 10:03 PM   #4
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heres mine
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Old 04-18-05, 10:05 PM   #5
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Rigid. Suspension is pretty nice for rocky descents, but most of the land around here you can ride with a rigid, and it adds an element of danger to it. Fun stuff...


EDIT: Cool, an excuse to paste a pic of my dk in here.


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Old 04-18-05, 10:07 PM   #6
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I think that's a good choice. A Surly 1x1 is about as trouble free as you can get. I put a suspension fork on my singlespeed a couple years ago, but i'm in the process of switching back. A rigid bike keeps your bike handling in check.
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Old 04-18-05, 10:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trekkie820
...That is the question. I want more simplicity worked into my ride so I can get more cheap, trouble free years, but I ride some pretty technical trails. I am willing to subject my body to more pain at the expense of complexity, and I also feel that a Surly 1x1 is the way to go. Any insight into this would be great, hopefully from rigid users giving testimony.
I'll answer your question with a question:

Do you like your joints? Do you like NOT having neck pain? Do you like your back? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions then you should be riding a bike with suspension. See how simple that was?
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Old 04-19-05, 05:47 AM   #8
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neck and back pain is a product of a hardtail, which I have anyway. I will be running large 2.35 IRC Tamashi DH tires on itto soak up some of the hits. And, I hate people who answer questions with questions. It shows that you don't know what you're talking about.
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Old 04-19-05, 08:30 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by trekkie820
neck and back pain is a product of a hardtail, which I have anyway. I will be running large 2.35 IRC Tamashi DH tires on itto soak up some of the hits. And, I hate people who answer questions with questions. It shows that you don't know what you're talking about.
Apparently you've never heard of Socrates hmmm? Sometimes little knobs like you should stick to pondering the peanut butter crackers mom puts in your lunch and leave the heavy thought (for you that means things like long division, reading anything more profound than a comic book, etc) to us big boys who don't need to make a run to our local Toys-R-Us to buy a "Clue."
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Old 04-19-05, 08:35 AM   #10
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I rode rigid in the Phoenix area for a while. It's the rockiest place I've ever ridden and I've heard many others say the same. Even there it's really not that bad. You ride differently on a rigid. Instead of picking the straight line you pick the smooth one. While it's not usually faster, it's not all that much slower either. My rigid ride times are within a couple minutes of my suspension ride times on the same trail. The smoother the trail the less the difference. A rigid fork is a little rougher, but does handle better because there is much less lateral flex. Your shoulders and triceps will be a little sore at first, but the body gets used to it. I say go for it. The first time you pass a guy riding a full suspension bike on the rough section of the trail you'll never want to go back, and if/when you do go back you'll realize how much the rigid bike helps your bike handling skills.
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Old 04-19-05, 08:36 AM   #11
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My Trek 920 was from an era when suspension was the exception. We got down all the tracks on our rigids no worries. We never ended up contorted cripples from the pounding we took. To be honest, the only thing that used to worry me was my finger joints feeling like they were separating. The rest of the body does fine with absorbing the rest of the hits you take.

That being said, I'm going to buy a FS xc bike just to see what it's like. Wonder if I'll like it or head back to the old 920.
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Old 04-19-05, 08:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CranxOC
Apparently you've never heard of Socrates hmmm? Sometimes little knobs like you should stick to pondering the peanut butter crackers mom puts in your lunch and leave the heavy thought (for you that means things like long division, reading anything more profound than a comic book, etc) to us big boys who don't need to make a run to our local Toys-R-Us to buy a "Clue."
Socrates had a brain, you are arguing the merits of a suspension bike versus a rigid, which are matters of personal preference. You do not contribute anything to the original question, so whats the point of your comment? Do you just like to look at the snide remarks that you can make, or do you think refuting everyone with some pompus dumbass remarkis the way to be? What is it with you Californians, you all have a stick up your ass.
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Old 04-19-05, 09:34 AM   #13
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Ah, knew I had pictures lying around somwhere. Doubt it will impress to many, but geez she's been on some fantastic rides in her time. (Yeah she's set up for road work there).

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Old 04-19-05, 09:57 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trekkie820
Socrates had a brain, you are arguing the merits of a suspension bike versus a rigid, which are matters of personal preference. You do not contribute anything to the original question, so whats the point of your comment? Do you just like to look at the snide remarks that you can make, or do you think refuting everyone with some pompus dumbass remarkis the way to be? What is it with you Californians, you all have a stick up your ass.
Before you go bashing someone for not having a brain you might want to learn to spell. That said, the point was pretty simple but, apparently, was not simple enough for those with simple minds. Since you obviously can't comprehend the point unless it's laid out before you in a Dr. Seuss-esque manner, let me explain:

Your joints are only meant to take a certain level of pounding. Inside your joints are fluids, cartilage, musculature, ligaments and tendons that will flex and reduce shock to whatever degree they can. Over time, with enough pounding, your joints begin to breakdown and you develop arthritis, tendonitis, torn muscles and micro fractures of the joints and spinal column…sounds pleasant, doesn’t it?

My question to those of you who’ve decided that fully rigid bikes are somehow the end-all and be-all trail riding is this: why would you want to put your body through that kind of pounding when it’s TOTALLY and completely unnecessary?

Suspension, to a large extent, mitigates the abuse and damage that is imposed upon your body through the sport of mountain biking so, why would anyone shun that technology if they don’t have to? That would be like a marathon runner saying that they really wanted to get back to the roots of running and throwing on a pair of leather moccasins for the heck of it! Sounds moronic, doesn’t it?

P.S. You don't have to be jealous that I live in SoCal while you're probably stuck in some God forsaken part of the continent that experiences crap weather six months out of the year; doesn't have endless miles of unmatched trails surrounding you in every direction; is devoid of incredible beaches and tremendous ski slopes; and is likely without even a hint of an attractive women for hundreds of miles. It's OK bro, cry your tears, those of us here in SoCal understand that not everyone can live the life of privilege that we enjoy...beeyatch!
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Old 04-19-05, 10:18 AM   #15
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P.S. You don't have to be jealous that I live in SoCal while you're probably stuck in some God forsaken part of the continent that experiences crap weather six months out of the year; doesn't have endless miles of unmatched trails surrounding you in every direction; is devoid of incredible beaches and tremendous ski slopes; and is likely without even a hint of an attractive women for hundreds of miles. It's OK bro, cry your tears, those of us here in SoCal understand that not everyone can live the life of privilege that we enjoy...beeyatch!
It's too hot and dry down in SoCal, NorCal is greener, doesn't get as sunbaked and has just as many trails and ski slopes. I wouldn't know about the attractive women because because I'm married
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Old 04-19-05, 10:19 AM   #16
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I have been debating going back to fully rigid. I have one SS already, and about to convert my Y2K Homegrown to SS. I had a fully rigid back in the day and had no real pain problems. Of course that was 1989, and I was 17. I had the drivetrain go before the fork. I was riding for a year with a "manual tranny" before I bent the fork out like a lowrider. It was fun, and simple. I find it to be a give and take. There are some trails where having some travel can help, and there are parts where I feel rigid could be better. But I see you have done some homework by wanting to go with a fat tire.
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Old 04-19-05, 10:30 AM   #17
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It's too hot and dry down in SoCal, NorCal is greener, doesn't get as sunbaked and has just as many trails and ski slopes. I wouldn't know about the attractive women because because I'm married
NoCal's nice too but you guys don't have the beaches or the surf. OK, so you have some of the biggest waves in the World up there in Half Moon Bay but, in order to ride those you have to have a death wish (frigid temps, wicked rip-tide, great white sharks, jagged rocks, crazy winds and a whole host of other pleasantries that will keep my butt out of that water )

As for the women; I'm VERY happily married as well but, when you live down here you pretty much can't help but notice that you're surrounded by the most attractive women in the World. If you don't notice you're either blind or gay.
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Old 04-19-05, 10:33 AM   #18
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If only there was a way to mix the beauty of so cal sun and surf with the amazing temprate rain forests a little further north. That would be heaven.
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Old 04-19-05, 10:51 AM   #19
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We have lots of nice beaches but the only people who tend to go in the water are the surfers and kids who are too young to think about the fact that the water is *so* cold.
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Old 04-19-05, 10:59 AM   #20
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If only there was a way to mix the beauty of so cal sun and surf with the amazing temprate rain forests a little further north. That would be heaven.
They call that place...Hawai'i!
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Old 04-19-05, 11:14 AM   #21
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Hahaha...Yeah I suppose so. I always forget about that little place in the middle of no where.
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Old 04-19-05, 02:59 PM   #22
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Bought a Surly 1x1 yesterday. I ll let you know how it holds up.
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Old 04-20-05, 06:44 AM   #23
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Good luck

You will love it. Give it some time. Give your body time to adjust and get stronger. Give your mind time to unlearn old habits and dismiss pre-conceived notions of what you can do with the bike.

For me, it offers a different experience. I have a full suspension xc bike with gears. I will admit it is easier on my body than my rigid singlespeeds.
And riding technical terrain on a rigid singlespeed bike will beat the snot out of you. For me, it is 2 days a week tops on the rigid 1 speeds.

But the upside? I really don't know how to describe it. A better connection to the trail? perhaps. The simplicity and lightness of the bikes? beautiful.
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Old 04-21-05, 08:27 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CranxOC
P.S. You don't have to be jealous that I live in SoCal while you're probably stuck in some God forsaken part of the continent that experiences crap weather six months out of the year; doesn't have endless miles of unmatched trails surrounding you in every direction; is devoid of incredible beaches and tremendous ski slopes; and is likely without even a hint of an attractive women for hundreds of miles. It's OK bro, cry your tears, those of us here in SoCal understand that not everyone can live the life of privilege that we enjoy...beeyatch!
Don't worry i am not jealous of your stuck up attitude.

Grow up.
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Old 04-21-05, 09:54 PM   #25
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We have lots of nice beaches but the only people who tend to go in the water are the surfers and kids who are too young to think about the fact that the water is *so* cold.
We here in the Colorado Front Range (Denver area) have a great beach too. Only problem is there isn't any water. No water!? Then what the f**k make it so great you might ask. Well, 65 million years ago it was a beach. It even has little dinosaur tracks running through the sand to prove it. Since then it has been tipped up at about a 60 degree angle and it now forms a long narrow hogback ridge. Some people call it Dinosaur Ridge, but its formal name is the Dokota Hogback Ridge. To us mountain bikers it's just Dakota Ridge and it has a kick-ass gnarly technical singletrack running right across the spine. I say who needs water to enjoy a great day at the beach when you can ride sweet singletrack instead?
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