Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: new bike

  1. #1
    Member Tomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    My Bikes
    2001 fisher big sur
    Posts
    43
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What to Buy?

    I am currently riding on a Western Auto pos, and am seriously looking for a better bike. I have gotten into riding with a couple of friends, and my present bike is just not up to the punishment that I attempt to give it on the local trails.

    I have been heavily researching the topic over the past couple of weeks and am looking to spend anywhere from $400-$700. I am presently considering Trek 4500, 6500, Schwinn Moab, Specialized Stumpjumpper, and Cannondale F400.

    What is the general sentiment regarding bikes for newbies? Which is the most suitable for a relatively new mtb'er? What other models should I consider? Any bad experiences with any of these bikes?

    Any responses would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

    -Tomas

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cambronne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    All of the machines you've mentionned are very good... So much so, that it's really a choice of "which bike shop do you like and trust?" I like Specialized's bikes, but I ride a Trek... because the Trek shop owner and I are friends, and the only Specialized bikes available here are via internet or mail-order. Cannondale bikes are very well assembled, also. Perhaps next time I "need" a bike...

    Look for the best grade component group and the lightest weight in your price range. It'll all be Shimano this or that, but low-end Shimano parts can be miserable to live with. Likewise, a beautiful but heavy bike can be a tin pig on the trail.

    Ride the bike before you commit... the salesman won't say no... although, if you leave a credit card with him, you can go farther than just an obligatory ride 'round the block. Is the bike last year's model? If so, then negotiate a sale price... often, the only differences from the latest ones are cosmetic.

    See what the dealer will "include" with the sale... helmet? rear rack? shorts, perhaps? Establish a good relationship with the shop, and they'll fettle your bike for years to come... something that is unavailable at any price when dealing with a department store... or a web site.

  3. #3
    It's the fight in the man Rich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Churton Park, Wellington, NZ
    My Bikes
    Pace RC200 F2 (British Built!)
    Posts
    1,209
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Good advice

    Hi Tom,

    Yep, good advice above...my 2 cents worth would be to spend as much money as you can afford. Out of the bikes you highlighted, I'd go for the Specialized Stumpjumper, over 10 years has gone into this baby...possibly the best bike out there at that price range.

    If you can get hold of last years model *in any of the bikes you highlighted* youm should be able to get a good deal over this years bikes....

    Good luck with whatever you choose, and have fun on the trails...

    RICH

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    22
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    bike 2 buy

    I ride the Trek 6500, and I love it. I don't have any complaints about my Trek, and I feel that I made a good purchase. I have a few friends that swear by C-dales, and I also know of a few people that would sell their car before they sold their Stumpjumpers.

    I think that it all breaks down to what feels best to you.

    Test ride. Test ride. Test ride. Test ride.

    If a bike shop in your area won't let you test ride, then they really don't want your business.

    As far as newbies go: in my area newbies are welcomed along to ride with the more experienced people. Everyone understands that not everyone starts with clipless pedals and Ti bikes. You have to start somewhere, so regardless of where it "ranks", your bike is your BIKE and as long as it's comfortable to you then you have made a good decision. I think that the range of bikes that you have named are of good enough quality to not let you down as you venture further into your hobby of mountain biking. You shouldn't be disappointed with any of your selections, but keep in mind that you get what you pay for.


    Best of luck to you.

    [Edited by fantinelj on 12-05-2000 at 07:49 AM]

  5. #5
    Member Tomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    My Bikes
    2001 fisher big sur
    Posts
    43
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thanks!

    Thank you all for the advice. I am still looking, but your adivce will certainly be factored into my purchase.

    -Tomas

  6. #6
    NOT a weight weenie Hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    1,762
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love this question. My advice is to ride everything in site. It is you ultimately who will use this for whatever for of riding you will be doing. I also higly reccomend the above advice. Although personal preference would be the Stumpie.

  7. #7
    NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS! a2psyklnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
    My Bikes
    Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
    Posts
    7,972
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    New? Maybe Not! Try Used?

    All good advice and I agree with what has already been said, I really like the stumpjumpers, but I work at a shop that sells C'Dales and they're very nice as well. Currently, we have two left over models that have been reduced and are in your price range, a F600 and a F700. Thus proving, you can get a great deal on old stock items, so check around and ride as many different bikes as you can. Also, my advice is to spend your money on a better frame, and not worry too much about the components. The components will wear out and need to be replaced, so upgrade at that point. You're more likely to keep the frame for a lot longer if it's of better quality.
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
    "Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •