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  1. #1
    Lost in the Black Hills mx_599's Avatar
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    Cutting Threadless Steerers, seat posts, bars, etc.

    Just wondering what the preferred method was for cutting some of these items? Should I buy this tool for my steerer tube?

    http://www.bikeparts.com/search_results.asp?ID=PK6210

    And how about these types of tools? ("pipe cutters")

    http://www.bikeparts.com/search_results.asp?ID=GT0120

    Any advice greatly appreciated because I will soon be needing to cut the steerer on my new forks.

    thanks

  2. #2
    klondike300 klondike300's Avatar
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    The tubing cutter (less expensive of the two) works fine for most metals. Don't try and cut carbon fiber with it though. Just go easy on the pressure and you'll have no crimping problems. So parts are such thin wall you need to be careful no matter what you use. A little oil/WD 40 etc helps also. Get a fine tooth file to get the burrs off and have fun. You can get them at just about any home improvement store.

  3. #3
    Senior Member jalexei's Avatar
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    You'll hear arguments either way on the threadless saw guide, but I certainly wouldn't pay $43.00 for one. I have it (and like it - it seems like a small price to pay to insure a straight cut. Unless you've cut long, you don't get a second chance if you mess it up) - got it at Jenson for $26.95.

    As for the cutting, I've had success with a plain old hack saw. Just use a fresh blade, not too much pressure, and take your time.

  4. #4
    one less horse cryptid01's Avatar
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    I have tried both tools, and my preference is the saw guide. The tubing cutter will work, but it isn't really the proper tool for the job.

  5. #5
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Here's a silly question. Why buy a tool for something a bike shop can do for you in 5 minutes and that you generally only have to do once? Unless you're planning on cutting a lot of steerer tubes you don't need the tool.
    On the flip side if you're a tool hound like me you'll get a guide and a decent hacksaw with blades for both metal and carbon

  6. #6
    Keep Right Except to Pass
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    It's always more satisfying to do things yourself.

    What about a pair of hose-clamps as a guide?

    I don't like dealing with the flare that results from using a tubing cutter.

  7. #7
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eros
    What about a pair of hose-clamps as a guide?
    Workable, but the actual guide does the trick so much better. It's virtually impossible not to get a dead straight cut

  8. #8
    Senior Member jalexei's Avatar
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    Here's a silly question. Why buy a tool for something a bike shop can do for you in 5 minutes and that you generally only have to do once?
    Well, you answered your own question, but even if it's a job I'll only do once, I like to be able to do it myself. And I love any excuse to get new tools. Plus, while I do buy from my local shops, I happened to get my last fork via eBay, and I felt really self-conscious bringing them something to work on that I didn't purchase there.

    I've found that I have a $50-ish cutoff, where if the tool for a particular task costs more than that I'll take it to the LBS. So for example I've got the doohicky that sets the star-fangled nut, but when it comes to putting new headset cups in, I'm not paying $115 for the headset press (I'd probably make one, in that case). Various bottom bracket tools? Check. Thing that faces the BB threads? Heading for the shop...

  9. #9
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jalexei
    Well, you answered your own question,
    It wasn't intended to really be answered. It was intended to get the OP (original poster) thinking

  10. #10
    one less horse cryptid01's Avatar
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    Old People?

  11. #11
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gastro
    Old People?
    Original Poster. I've trained you well gastro

  12. #12
    one less horse cryptid01's Avatar
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    lol


  13. #13
    blithering idiot jhota's Avatar
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    i used an angle grinder and a sharpie once. quick and painless... and i'm so glad i didn't foul up.

  14. #14
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhota
    i'm so glad i didn't foul up.
    Key words

  15. #15
    Frosted Flake
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    I used the tube cutter on the Judy steer tube, which is steel, and no problems. The less pressure you apply and still cut the better.
    It's either old age or I need more suspension...

    04 Kona Blast (mine)
    05 Trek 4500 (hers)

  16. #16
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    You don't even need the guide if you have some time, a hack saw and a file.

    wrap a piece of paper around the steer tube so the top edge lines up with the cut line. line the paper up until all the edges are square with eachother, that way you know the line will be perpendicular to the tube. tape it in place and spray a little paint on the portion of the tube you are going to cut off. after it dries, make your cut carefully in the painted area and then fine tune it with a file until all the paint is gone. voila! you have a perfectly level cut without spending $30-$40.

  17. #17
    Lost in the Black Hills mx_599's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input. I will probably buy the Park Tool guide for cutting. Yes...I am a specialty tool fiend as well. Any excuse to buy a tool is quickly expoited.

    As others mentioned, I get a cheap thrill out of doing things myself. I do not like other people working on my vehicles, motorcycles, or mountain bikes

  18. #18
    one less horse cryptid01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    Yes...I am a specialty tool fiend as well. Any excuse to buy a tool is quickly expoited.
    Me too. One of my crowning moments was when I had to buy Park tools to work on my car. It doubled the high.

  19. #19
    Lost in the Black Hills mx_599's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gastro
    Park tools to work on my car.
    Elaborate...

  20. #20
    one less horse cryptid01's Avatar
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    Well, they didn't have to be Park tools, necessarily, but you know...

    Car is an E36 BMW, and there are a couple places where clearances are tight. This justified:

    HCW-6 (32mm spanner) to remove engine fan nut
    SCW-16 (16mm cone wrench) to hold swaybar endlinks.

  21. #21
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gastro
    Well, they didn't have to be Park tools, necessarily, but you know...

    Car is an E36 BMW, and there are a couple places where clearances are tight. This justified:

    HCW-6 (32mm spanner) to remove engine fan nut
    SCW-16 (16mm cone wrench) to hold swaybar endlinks.
    I bow to your cross-transportational mode tool usage.
    Strong the Force is in this one

  22. #22
    blithering idiot jhota's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raiyn
    Key words
    meh. i'd do it again. all it takes is no fear and a steady hand. plus, it's really really fast.

    but i'm used to using power/air tools, having been a professional auto mechanic for the past dozen years or so. just lopping a few inches off a steerer tube is nothing compared to some of the engine/suspension/body stuff i've done.

    but i don't recommend it as a course for anyone else to take.

  23. #23
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhota
    but i don't recommend it as a course for anyone else to take.
    That would be the reason I made the statement - Neither do I

  24. #24
    Senior Member jalexei's Avatar
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    Let's face it - as men have moved out of caves and into cubicles, the acquisition and hoarding of potentially unnecessary tools is the only modern expression of hunter/gatherer we have left (well, other than hunting, I suppose, but guns scare me, so I've settled for wrenches)

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