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Thread: What is XC?

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    Jubalayo Unogwaja! Bokkie's Avatar
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    What is XC?

    OK you lot. I'm new to this game. Learning as I go along. Start me off. DH I think means downhill? What is XC?

    For the record, I'm getting a Cannondale Gemini 1000. Does that mean I'm cool? :-)

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    Donating member Richard D's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Bokkie
    OK you lot. I'm new to this game. Learning as I go along. Start me off. DH I think means downhill? What is XC?

    For the record, I'm getting a Cannondale Gemini 1000. Does that mean I'm cool? :-)
    XC - Cross country

    Only if it's bright pink
    Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)

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    Jubalayo Unogwaja! Bokkie's Avatar
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    In simple terms, is XC then the type of riding you do over trails, that is casual, not too much in the way of extremes? In other words, I'd plant myself in the softer variety, doing nothing more adventurous than jumping from the pavement onto the road! Occasional risks, but at my age, I can't handle too much anymore.

  4. #4
    I ride a REAL Schwinn!
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    XC = cross country = Down and UP the hill. Cross-country doesn't include extreme downhilling. I guess you could call it more casual, although a skilled XC rider could handle just about anything. XC would be the type of trail that you would find most anywhere, the kind of riding that you think you want to do. Your bike could handle some heavier downhilling and bigger hits though, being a Gemini. Your full-suspension and the design of the bike lends it more to a freeride type of riding. This just means that it may a bit harder up the hills than your buddies, but you'll have a better ride coming down. Your bike has the ability to do just about whatever you want. You should take some risks, you'd be surprised what it can do.
    Last edited by moabrider47; 07-11-02 at 07:17 AM.

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    Jubalayo Unogwaja! Bokkie's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. Seems that I'm going to have a lot of fun. Just need to get my wife equipped and then off we go!

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    what are you going to get your wife?
    ''Pain is weakness leaving the body''
    -Alec Endres-

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    Jubalayo Unogwaja! Bokkie's Avatar
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    A tough call. She isn't 'in' to the same techno-thing that I am. To her a bike for the job is just that, a bike for the job. I'll get her a full suss but something at the lower to mid-price range. It seems you can get fairly decent bikes and the specs get better year-on-year.

    I have a Cannondale road bike already, and when I looked at disc brakes 3 years ago, they cost an awful lot. Now, you get to see them on some basic models. Kitting out for MTB use is quite a radical change. Going out is the Tour de France type kit in favour of more rugged attire and heavy duty boots will replace the gossamer thin shoes I use now. The change to off-road was a hard one to make, but ultimately was based on sound judgement. Anyone who's ridden on the road in the UK will know how dangerous it can be. What tipped it for us, was when a large truck passed her literally with no visible daylight between the mirror and her head. It was that close. I reckon that fall off we will but I'd rather face-plant on something relatively softer and forgiving, than be wiped out by a road user. I digress.

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    The North Downs and the South Downs have excellent riding with long bridleways. You are right between them, so spoilled for choice. Most riding in the S.E of England is a mixture of road and trail, we just dont have the long trails, and many of the smaller roads are quite good for cycling. Having said that, the country lanes around Holmbury St Mary where I used to work scared me with all the fast cars.

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    Senior Member hosehead's Avatar
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    You're dropping a lot of money on a bike like that for someone who's just getting started. You might be happier getting a cheaper bike and working your way up. The Gemini 1000, by the way, is not a cross country (XC) mountain bike.

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