Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member Jameson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    preload, rebound etc.

    I just recieved a new fork and am a little lost. I really don't understand what the adjustments are for. I can not tell a difference. I set the sag for my given weight so now I should be able to snap off the adjusters right? Kidding, but when do I need to change these? I've ridden on and off for the past 20 years and ever since they came out I've never really understood why. Once the weight of the rider is factored in what needs adjusting? Carring more stuff? Terrain never really influenced my settings. They feel similar. Maybe it is because I am not a large person weighing in at around 160 or so. Any help? Thoughts? Feelings?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Drunken Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Spain, although I'm Hungarian
    My Bikes
    Check signature
    Posts
    1,855
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jameson
    I just recieved a new fork and am a little lost. I really don't understand what the adjustments are for. I can not tell a difference. I set the sag for my given weight so now I should be able to snap off the adjusters right? Kidding, but when do I need to change these? I've ridden on and off for the past 20 years and ever since they came out I've never really understood why. Once the weight of the rider is factored in what needs adjusting? Carring more stuff? Terrain never really influenced my settings. They feel similar. Maybe it is because I am not a large person weighing in at around 160 or so. Any help? Thoughts? Feelings?
    Preload I'm not totally sure about but rebound adjustment is something to adjust the speed at which the fork "rebounds" (uncompresses). I'd assume if I was going big then I'd dial in slow rebound but if I was going to a place where there are lots of small jumps and drops and the like I'd dial in fast rebound.
    2005 Ironhorse 7.3
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  3. #3
    Ouch!!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    453
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Consider preload as sag. A rough rule of thumb is that you want about 20 percent of the forks total compression to be used just by sitting on the bike.

    Preload is how much force the fork uses reacting to compression. Rebound is how quickly the fork reacts to no compression.
    "Do, or do not - there is no 'try'."
    Yoda

    RIP sydney.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Drunken Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Spain, although I'm Hungarian
    My Bikes
    Check signature
    Posts
    1,855
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shane45
    Consider preload as sag. A rough rule of thumb is that you want about 20 percent of the forks total compression to be used just by sitting on the bike.

    Preload is the fork reacting to compression. Rebound is the fork reacting to no compression.
    If I sit on my bike the sag is literally about 1 or 2 mm... which means 1 or 2% of the fork's total compression... but then again my fork will compress 50mm after I throw myself off a 6 foot drop.
    2005 Ironhorse 7.3
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  5. #5
    Ouch!!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    453
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Drunken Chicken
    but then again my fork will compress 50mm after I throw myself off a 6 foot drop.
    Maniac.



    Sounds like you're going to have to start doing waaaaay bigger drops, as it appears you are only using about 50 percent of your fork's total capacity.
    "Do, or do not - there is no 'try'."
    Yoda

    RIP sydney.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Drunken Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Spain, although I'm Hungarian
    My Bikes
    Check signature
    Posts
    1,855
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shane45
    Maniac.



    Sounds like you're going to have to start doing waaaaay bigger drops, as it appears you are only using about 50 percent of your fork's total capacity.
    Time to hit those 12 footers... actually, lets keep it at 11 so it doesn't bottom out. Now that I think about it, there ARE no 12 footers anywhere near where I live.
    Seriously though, I'm not kidding, I did a 5 or 6 footer to tranny and the fork reached 50mm of compression (I knew it was 50mm because I checked until where the lube was on the stanchions).
    2005 Ironhorse 7.3
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  7. #7
    Ouch!!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    453
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's some serious preload you have dialed into that fork, in that case! It must ride pretty firm, no?
    "Do, or do not - there is no 'try'."
    Yoda

    RIP sydney.

  8. #8
    UareFASTjustNOTfastENOUGH MasterSezFaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Amongst the hills in So.Cal.
    My Bikes
    Scott Gambler, Scott Ransom, Bianchi C2C 928
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jameson
    I just recieved a new fork and am a little lost. I really don't understand what the adjustments are for. I can not tell a difference. I set the sag for my given weight so now I should be able to snap off the adjusters right? Kidding, but when do I need to change these? I've ridden on and off for the past 20 years and ever since they came out I've never really understood why. Once the weight of the rider is factored in what needs adjusting? Carring more stuff? Terrain never really influenced my settings. They feel similar. Maybe it is because I am not a large person weighing in at around 160 or so. Any help? Thoughts? Feelings?
    Once initial sag is set, if you like the way the bike rides then adjust nothing. If you are new to the sport or to suspension I would say ride it the way it is untill you get some more expieriance. Makes things easier

    Rebound will affect how fast the for returns to it extended position
    Compression will affect how fast it compresses

    Big hits with time in between you will want a slower compression and a bit slower rebound (rebound here is not as important as in other situations but you will want it to rebound fast enough that you have full travel by the next hit but to fast could bounce you off the bike on a hard hit or bad landing.

    Jumping multiple jumpe you will want compression set at a medium rate and agin a bit slower rebound (if rebound is to fast it will want to toss your front over your head.

    If you ride a lot of stutter bumps a faster rebound with a midium rate compression, must set the fork properly here because if the rebound is to slow you will compress the fork and have no suspension, if it is to fast it will feel like a ridged fork.

    There is more to it but that will give you an idea what to do. It is somewhat a science and you must be able to tell what your bike is doing under you when riding, ie sliding, fork moving to fast or slow etc. etc. etc


  9. #9
    Senior Member Jameson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    helpful, master. Thanks

  10. #10
    Senior Member Al K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Drunken Chicken
    SNIP(I knew it was 50mm because I checked until where the lube was on the stanchions).
    Hi DC,

    I put plasic ties around front and rear shocks in order to guage travel. I did various types of stuff, as small jumps, logs, flats, etc. checking and resetting ties after each. Very useful and suprising feedback. In particular, I found that rear was bottoming out regularly, so I adjusted rear shock spring.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Drunken Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Spain, although I'm Hungarian
    My Bikes
    Check signature
    Posts
    1,855
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shane45
    That's some serious preload you have dialed into that fork, in that case! It must ride pretty firm, no?
    No, the correct term is crap. Just kidding, but it isn't exactly a good fork. Better than a rigid fork but not better than a fair amount of suspension forks (you know what I realised? The fork isn't good for absorbing hits and the like, it's there for the bob. Seriously, I start climbing a hill, get out of the saddle and it bobs a fair amount).
    Quote Originally Posted by Al K
    Hi DC,

    I put plasic ties around front and rear shocks in order to guage travel. I did various types of stuff, as small jumps, logs, flats, etc. checking and resetting ties after each. Very useful and suprising feedback. In particular, I found that rear was bottoming out regularly, so I adjusted rear shock spring.
    Hehe, that's a good idea! Works better than lube because after each stunt you'd need to wipe the stanchions.
    2005 Ironhorse 7.3
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •