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  1. #1
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    6'5" & 370lbs. Bike suggestions?

    My bro-in-law is looking for a bike that won't buckle under his sumo-sized body. He would prefer front suspension and no more than $500. Anything cheaper would be even better.

  2. #2
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    Wow...I am 6'5 at 250 to 260. You may want to try an IronHorse Maverick. They sell them pretty cheap and under 500$ Canadian. They have a 'cruiser' style frame and are pretty confortable with a strong frame. You dont say what you location is but Norco's tend to make ManSized bikes as well...As for brands I am not sure but take a look at these (the price is in the specs tab)

    http://www.norco.com/bikes/2002bikes/adventure.htm

    Good luck and happy biking.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Whatever you pick, I'd suggest asking the shop to do a trade-up to thorn-resistant inner tubes and at least some 2.1" tires if it doesn't have them already (reason: TR tubes are very hard to pinch-flat, and big tire casings are harder to bottom out on rocks and curbs, which helps prevent dented rims).

    If the bike comes with a rear wheel that has a non-freehub design, the shop can probably upgrade the wheel and cogs to a freehub for a reasonable price at the time of purchase, and sell the original wheel later for a repair. Freehubs have the driveside axle bearing near the end of the axle, greatly reducing the likelihood of axle breakage. While they're at it, ask for an estimate to convert to a base-level Megarange cassette and rear derailleur, if you think your bro-in-law would benefit from an extra-low gear. Probably wouldn't cost too much after trade-up allowance on the stock freewheel (or cassette).

    If he can afford to do it right the first time and get it over with, I'd have the shop hand-build a very strong rear wheel for him: DeoreLX hub, 36 DT or Wheelsmith 14ga spokes and a Sun RhynoLite rim, with dummy spacers to run 7sp cassette if needed.

    I had a nice mentally-handicapped customer who rides and rides and rides, with a huge basket over the rear wheel for collecting scrap metal. He happens to be about as big as your bro-in-law too, and this wheel has really paid off in the long run for him, compared to the $50 basic alloy replacement wheels he was going through. With trade-in allowance on a typical stock wheel, this is about an US$80-90 upcharge by my figures.
    Last edited by mechBgon; 07-26-02 at 12:51 AM.

  4. #4
    NOT a weight weenie Hunter's Avatar
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    Wel how ironic. We has a customer roll in yeserday just as we closed about 6'5" and well over 300lbs. The Iron Horse Maverick, and Tempo is what we showed him. He is looking for comfort as well as the ability to exercise.

  5. #5
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    YEah the Maverick is just a BIG bike. It is huge with a good seatin ratio and if I remember fatter tires. Great for just cruising around and loosing weight.

  6. #6
    Donating member Richard D's Avatar
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    I would think if he avoids lightweigh cross-country frames, he'll probably be okay frame wise unless he starts using it for jumping/drop offs. Wheel wise consider having them swapped for downhill specified rims, tyres and tubes - these are a lot stronger than XC spec'd bits. I know a chap who must be of a similar weight if not height, who had a frame custom made for him and then spec'd downhill parts and he's not had any problems with wheel failure.

    Richard
    Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)

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