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  1. #1
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    Bike for a 6"1, 265 pound dude

    hi guys, what would you recommend for me? I'm a beginner and want to use the bike to exercise around town. I am willing to spend around $400-$500.

    thanks for your time.

  2. #2
    Senior Citizen DiRt DeViL's Avatar
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    What kind of riding you plan on doing. For a dude as big as you there are a couple of choices but know if they're on your budget.

    IMO the Kona Hoss series is the best for big guys.

    Hoss: http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...1&parentid=182

    Hoss Dee-Lux:
    http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...2&parentid=182

    Search around for a '04 if the '05 is over budget.
    "Life is not like a box of chocolates ...
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    Whatever you do today,
    may burn your ass tomorrow."


  3. #3
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    I would get some sort of Fat Tire bike... be it a MTB or ATB.

    I am 6'4" 240 I have an old Trek 7000 21" frame.
    I imagine a 18" frame would work for you... but if your gonna spend the money, go to a bike shop, they will fit you to a bike.

  4. #4
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL
    What kind of riding you plan on doing. For a dude as big as you there are a couple of choices but know if they're on your budget.

    IMO the Kona Hoss series is the best for big guys.

    Hoss: http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...1&parentid=182

    Hoss Dee-Lux:
    http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...2&parentid=182

    Search around for a '04 if the '05 is over budget.
    I agree. The Hoss series is the best out of the box big guy bike out there

  5. #5
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    i know this isn't the correct forum for this advice, but i'd say get a flatbar road bike.

    why? mountain bikes are good for the trail, but, as you say, you just want to exercise around town. you could get a hybrid, then, but flatbar road bikes are, i think, pretty good for the exercise oriented beginner. they're a lot faster than hybrids or mtn bikes, which generally makes exercise more fun

  6. #6
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    i know this isn't the correct forum for this advice, but i'd say get a flatbar road bike.

    why? mountain bikes are good for the trail, but, as you say, you just want to exercise around town. you could get a hybrid, then, but flatbar road bikes are, i think, pretty good for the exercise oriented beginner. they're a lot faster than hybrids or mtn bikes, which generally makes exercise more fun
    A mountain bike is a LOT more versatile than a flat bar roadie. With a simple switch of the tires he can have most of the speed of a flat bar roadie and all of the durabilty of the MTB

  7. #7
    Freak of Nature
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raiyn
    A mountain bike is a LOT more versatile than a flat bar roadie. With a simple switch of the tires he can have most of the speed of a flat bar roadie and all of the durabilty of the MTB
    No offense, but I don't think the switch is as simple as you make it out to be, especially for someone not experienced.

    The main advantage of road bikes is their narrow tires; the lack of rolling friction greatly increases speed. However, going to a narrower tire means narrower wheels than your standard 1.75 mtn bike. Thus the brakes must be changed as well to fully take advantage of narrow wheels.

    I have a rigid frame mtn bike that I used for commuting. I have slicks that are slightly narrower than the factory tires, but the large rim prevents me from getting tires as narrow as I'd like (I'd probably go 28c or so.) Also, the gearing is designed for mountain biking, not road riding, so I'm in my highest gear all the time on the flats; I find it very inadequate on the downhills.

    Bottom line, if I used my commuter bike for training, I'd get pissed and not use it. But instead I have a nice little road rocket that makes exercise awesome. But hey, it's a free country.

  8. #8
    ÖöÖöÖöÖöÖö Dannihilator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    No offense, but I don't think the switch is as simple as you make it out to be, especially for someone not experienced.

    The main advantage of road bikes is their narrow tires; the lack of rolling friction greatly increases speed. However, going to a narrower tire means narrower wheels than your standard 1.75 mtn bike. Thus the brakes must be changed as well to fully take advantage of narrow wheels.
    Bullcrap with the brakes, since the Hoss comes with disc brakes You can also fin slick tires in sizes larger than 1.75, for example maxxis makes a 26x2.5 slick called the hookworm which would be great for a guy the size of pet, lowq chance of pinch and puncture flats as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    I have a rigid frame mtn bike that I used for commuting. I have slicks that are slightly narrower than the factory tires, but the large rim prevents me from getting tires as narrow as I'd like (I'd probably go 28c or so.) Also, the gearing is designed for mountain biking, not road riding, so I'm in my highest gear all the time on the flats; I find it very inadequate on the downhills.
    Then switch to a road cassette then genious, a road cassette will work with a mountain bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    Bottom line, if I used my commuter bike for training, I'd get pissed and not use it. But instead I have a nice little road rocket that makes exercise awesome. But hey, it's a free country.
    If he ever gets on any kind of dirt, including a dirt road, that mountain bike will fare much better than that flat bar road bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by scrodzilla
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  9. #9
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    Hi peoples, thanks for your help. After reading the bikeforums for a week, I decided to get the Giant Yukon from my LBS. I tested the Kona Hoss Dee-Lux and it was great but out of my budget. Maybe sometime down the road.

  10. #10
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    No offense, but I don't think the switch is as simple as you make it out to be, especially for someone not experienced.
    Switching tires is about the EASIEST thing you can do on a bike
    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    The main advantage of road bikes is their narrow tires; the lack of rolling friction greatly increases speed.
    It's not that big of a difference. A 25mm wide tire is .4mm off of being an inch wide which is fairly common for MTB slicks. Besides he's a big guy. He's not going to want super skinny. In fact I'd suggest a 26x1.5
    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    However, going to a narrower tire means narrower wheels than your standard 1.75 mtn bike.
    1.75? Try 1.95 or 2.0 Again depending on the wheel he still has options. (I wouldn't go smaller than 1.5 on a Rhynolite for instance)
    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    Thus the brakes must be changed as well to fully take advantage of narrow wheels.
    That's a total load of crap.
    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    Also, the gearing is designed for mountain biking, not road riding, so I'm in my highest gear all the time on the flats; I find it very inadequate on the downhills.
    It's simple to put a road cassette on. In fact I run a SRAM R-9 11-23 on my rigid MTB commuter
    Quote Originally Posted by SquatchCO
    Bottom line, if I used my commuter bike for training, I'd get pissed and not use it. But instead I have a nice little road rocket that makes exercise awesome. But hey, it's a free country.
    Bottom line: He has FAR more options with a MTB

  11. #11
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    So I rode my bike today for about 4 miles and I put it in my pickup truck and then drove home. When I got home, my front tire was flat. Anyone know how this could have happened? Anyway, I'm going to the bike shop tomorrow to fix the problem.

    this sucks, maybe I'm too big for this bike.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raiyn
    Switching tires is about the EASIEST thing you can do on a bikeIt's not that big of a difference. A 25mm wide tire is .4mm off of being an inch wide which is fairly common for MTB slicks. Besides he's a big guy. He's not going to want super skinny. In fact I'd suggest a 26x1.51.75? Try 1.95 or 2.0 Again depending on the wheel he still has options. (I wouldn't go smaller than 1.5 on a Rhynolite for instance)It's simple to put a road cassette on. In fact I run a SRAM R-9 11-23 on my rigid MTB commuterBottom line: He has FAR more options with a MTB
    Ok, if you're going to put a road cassette on, you're talking about a wheel switch. Admittedly, that's much easier that a tire switch. As for the cassette change, it won't make much difference. I have a 12-25 rear on my road bike, which isn't much different that an 11-34 mtn cassette (at least in terms of the top gear). The problem is the crankset. the difference in a 53 versus a 44 is huge. And that's where mtn gearing falls flat on the road.

    Also, I'm a big guy, and I love narrow tires. Just a personal preference thing. Of course I keep a spare tube with me, but I don't find it a big deal.

    Yeah, he may have more options, but if all the options don't jive with his riding intent, what does the number of options matter?

    Anyways, the dude already bought the bike, so I'm going to lay it to rest.

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